Subject: It’s something new for you guys – a bug!!
Location: Yarmouth, ME
September 5, 2016 10:43 am
Hello!
Found this bug hanging out in our lawn, not on any plants, kinda maybe even trying to burrow? Not sure because my dog bothered it until it stopped trying to move 🙁
At that point, I moved it to the garden, tried and failed to research it, and then went back and took the attached photos.
Anyway, any help identifying this guy would be super appreciated!
Signature: Mikala

Waved Sphinx Hornworm

Waved Sphinx Hornworm

Dear Mikala,
Using the Sphingidae of the Americas site, we quickly identified your Hornworm as that of a Waved Sphinx,
Ceratomia undulosa.  According to the site:  “In the fifth instar, the spiracular ovals are decidedly red and the anal horn is off-white to pinkish laterally”  and “Just prior to pupation, larvae frequently take on a rosy hue.”  Your individual was getting ready to dig underground to pupate.  We hope it was able to realize its mission.

So neat! I’ve lived here most of my life and I’ve never seen anything like it before. Thanks for your help!
Mikala

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Mystery wasp
Location: Troy, VA
September 5, 2016 1:01 pm
I spotted this lovely wasp (I’m assuming it’s a wasp, but maybe it’s not) on goldenrod flowers by the side of a pond. It has a slight bluish sheen that doesn’t really show in the photos. I have done some searching but can’t really figure out what this is. Any help would be appreciated.
thanks again
Signature: Grace Pedalino

Potter Wasp

Potter Wasp

Dear Grace,
We identified your Potter Wasp as
Zethus spinipes thanks to this BugGuide image.  According to BugGuide:  “Black, thorax has yellow marks. Narrow yellow band on abdominal segment 3. Wings brown to violet. Bizarre stalked abdomen typical of genus.”  We are very excited to have a posting to add to our new tag:  Goldenrod Meadow.

Potter Wasp

Potter Wasp

Subject: Wasp ID and damage?
Location: North East NJ
September 4, 2016 9:49 pm
Hi Bugman, love the site, always informative and always entertaining. I cam across this wasp today. At first I thought perhaps it was a sand wasp and the protrusion on its face would help it dig, but the more I did research, the more I think it was some type of damage it received, (Not from me!)
Any idea of ID and if this was inflicted damage or a weird clypeus perhaps?
Signature: Thank you!!

Unknown Wasp with unusual Clypeus

Weevil Wasp with unusual Clypeus

Do you have any other images of this individual?  Perhaps a shot of the entire insect and a dorsal view?

Hi and thanks for the response!  I have two other shots, all from the side. I could not get a front shot due to the leaf and I did not want to disturb the wasp. Not knowing what type it was, I didn’t know it’s aggressiveness or habits. I will say the wasp was alive and did move slightly but not much at all for as close as I was. Perhaps dying? I could not find any other damage, or distinguishing features. I hope I attached the photos correctly. Thank you again!

Wasp with unusual Clypeus

Weevil Wasp with unusual Clypeus

Thanks for sending additional images.  We wanted to get an idea of the entire body structure of this unusual Hymenopteran.  Though we have searched for some time, including using the word “cowcatcher” to describe what appears to be an unusually structured clypeus, which we needed to look up on BugGuide, we have not had any luck locating anything similar looking.  We do not believe any damage or injury is evident.  The symmetry is too perfect.  We have written to Eric Eaton for assistance.  We are posting your submission and tagging it as unidentified and we hope to get back to you soon with an identification.

Wasp with unusual Clypeus

Weevil Wasp with unusual Clypeus

You rock! And I didn’t get intellectual enough to try ”Cowcatcher”. I did however try bee horn or wasp snout.  😊 Thank you for all your help. I love a mystery and your help is very appreciated. I also wondered if there was some kind of parasite that crawled out of there.

Eric Eaton Responds
Daniel:
It is a species of Cerceris.  The females hunt weevils or jewel beetles as food for their larval offspring.
Eric

Ed Note:  Though Eric Eaton has provided us with the genus name Cerceris for the Weevil Wasps, we have not been able to verify a species identity based on the images posted to BugGuide which notes:  “The faces of females are modified with unusual projections on the clypeus and clypeal margin.”  BugGuide also indicates:  “Most Cerceris species prey on adult beetles, but some also prey on bees and wasps. At least one species, C. halone, preys exclusively on acorn weevils (Curculio nasicus).”  According to InsectIdentification.org:  “”Members of the genus Cerceris are hunters and gatherers of weevils and other beetles.  Females dig nests in the ground along roads or in areas with loose sand or soil like basevall fields, parks and beaches.  They compact the material and create cells where they lay a fertilized egg.  They fly off, in search of future food for their larvae.  Female Weevil Wasps bite their prey and paralyze them.  The weevil or beetle is then brought back to the nest and stuffed inside a cell where they will remain paralyzed.  A hatching wasp larva will immediately begin feeding on the living, paralyzed weevil or beetle.  Once the wasp has grown, it will pupate into its adult form and leave the nest.  This BugGuide image looks close, but it is not identified to the species level.  After finding this BugGuide image, we are going to speculate this is Cerceris clypeata.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Identifying Large Cocoon
Location: Western Pennsylvania, USA
September 4, 2016 3:59 pm
Hi, My kids & I found this cocoon & we’ve never seen anything like it , it was laying on the ground underneath a large oak tree, looked like a leaf or leaves that are kinda stringy/fuzzy almost rope like, & tightly wrapped/rolled up into a very hard &solid cocoon that’s about 3 & 1/2inches long, & 2inches in diameter, &has 2small holes, each about as big as a pencil, & there appears to be something in it, but I’m not sure what it is, if it’s alive, how to tell, we are always discovering creatures of every kind, occasionally have come across some rare & endangered species, even thought to possible be extinct in our area, & through out all of adventures in exploring I have never seen a cocoon this large or looking anything like this, & the only insect that I could think of even close to this size is a cicada, &tho I’m not certain it’s a cocoon, maybe an eggsack or nest of some sort, we are very interested to learn about what’s around us & what this new discovery beholds, thank you for your time, knowledge, expertise, &information on this matter
Signature: Bugeyes3

Luna Moth Cocoon

Luna Moth Cocoon

Dear Bugeyes3,
This cocoon belongs to either a Luna Moth or a Polyphemus Moth, and the two holes are not a good sign because they may mean the cocoon was parasitized.  Gently shaking the cocoon should produce a sound like a heavy marble or something is inside.  If it sounds more like a rustle, it probably means that a wasp or fly has parasitized the cocoon.

Subject: gray and black beetle-like bug on swamp milkweed
Location: Fenton, MO
September 4, 2016 1:51 pm
Dear Bugman,
I ran into this creature while inspecting my swamp milkweed for monarch caterpillars. I found ver 10 caterpillars as well as this gray and sort of shiny creature. It has 5 black dots on each side and I think I see 6 legs but really small. its about the size of a ladybug. Found it on underside of Swamp. Milkweed leaf toward top of stem. I cannot tell where to begin to find out what this little guy or gal is and if he/she means harm to my milkweed or my monarch caterpillars.
Thanks so much!
Signature: fran

Swamp Milkweed Beetle Larva

Swamp Milkweed Leaf Beetle Larva

Dear Fran,
This is the larva of a Swamp Milkweed Leaf Beetle,
Labidomera clivicollis, and we identified it on BugGuide based on this image.  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae and adults cut several side-veins of a milkweed leaf prior to feeding, to reduce the sticky latex that would otherwise be produced at their feeding sites.”  So, the larvae and adults of the Swamp Milkweed Leaf Beetle share the same food source as the Monarch Butterfly, and unless the beetles are so populous that they defoliate the plants, they are not a threat to either the milkweed or the Monarch caterpillars.

Thanks you so much.  A few folks had thought it might be a false Potato Bug larvae??? Since I found it on a swamp milkweed leaf, a Swamp Milkweed Leaf Beetle makes sense!
Thanks do much!
fran

 

Subject: isnt this a paper kite butterfly..??
Location: Kalimantan Island, Indonesia
September 4, 2016 9:34 pm
hello.. i want to know about this butterfly.. do you think this is a paper kite butterfly (Idea leuconoe)..?? i took the picture in Kalimantan Island,, Indonesia..
Signature: Reza Adi Pratama

Blue Glassy Tiger

Blue Glassy Tiger

Dear Reza,
We found the butterfly you mentioned,
Idea leuconoe, pictured on Butterfly Circle where it is commonly called a Mangrove Tree Nymph, and it is listed in the subfamily Danainae, which is the same subfamily as your individual, but it is also a different species.  We located an image on FlickR that matches your image and the butterfly is identified as a Blue Glassy Tiger, Ideopsis vulgaris.  According to Butterflies of Singapore:  “This species is locally common in Singapore and is most   likely encountered in coastal mangrove habitats such as the Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve and Pasir Ris Park. Occasionally the adults can also be spotted in some urban parks and gardens.”  The site also has excellent images of the entire life cycle of the Blue Glassy Tiger.