Subject:  Cedar beetle or something else?
Geographic location of the bug:  Evergreen Park, IL
Date: 06/08/2019
Time: 11:52 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I have a raised bed garden made from organic cedar wood. This is my third year with it, and I have never noticed these bugs before. From far away I though it was a small frog, which would have been odd. Upon a closer look I noticed that it is a beetle. Is this bug a threat to my herbs and vegetables? I have a dog and small children that play near (sometimes in) my garden, will it bite or hurt my child or dog? If it gets in my home is there going to be an issue?
How you want your letter signed:  Sincerely, Laura McRae

Stag Beetle

Dear Laura,
This is a Stag Beetle in the family Lucanidae.  It will not harm your herbs and vegetables.  Stag Beetles have powerful mandibles, and they might nip if carelessly handled, but they are not considered dangerous to humans or pets.  We believe your individual might be
Lucanus placidus based on this BugGuide image.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Mystery Beetle
Geographic location of the bug:  Potomac, Maryland
Date: 06/09/2019
Time: 09:50 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  We always try to identify insects we find. But we’ve been unable to ID this particular insect, which we believe is a beetle. We’ve looked in 2 different guides, but no match. Can you help us?
How you want your letter signed:  Caleb & Adam

Oriental Beetle

Dear Caleb & Adam,
We identified this Invasive Exotic Oriental Beetle,
Exomala orientalis, thanks to Beetles of Eastern North America by Arthur V. Evans.  Here is a matching image on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “native to E. Asia, adventive in NA (*NS-GA to ON-WI-*MO)(*BG data), and spreading” and “earliest US records: 1920s.”

Subject:  Scary bug
Geographic location of the bug:  Georgia, rainy
Date: 06/09/2019
Time: 10:11 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  So I went outside to take my dog out, and outside our garage door were these two bugs and they have been there now for a few hours without any movement
How you want your letter signed:  bugman

Annual Cicada with Exuvia

This is an image of a winged Annual Cicada and the shed larval skin or exuvia it left behind when it emerged from living underground and metamorphosed into a winged adult.  Annual Cicadas are also known as Dog Day Harvestflies and they are considered the loudest insects on earth.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What kind of moth is this?
Geographic location of the bug:  Upstate New York
Date: 06/09/2019
Time: 12:32 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  A neighbor found this moth in her garden. It sprays a liquid from its hind end when threatened. We are in Bloomingdale, NY. Upstate. Wondering what kind of moth it is.
How you want your letter signed:  Al Schrage

Modest Sphinx

Dear Al,
This is a Modest Sphinx,
Pachysphinx modesta, and we speculate that the “liquid from its hind end” is a byproduct of its recent metamorphosis into an adult.  You can read more about the Modest Sphinx on Sphingidae of the Americas.

Subject:  Flying bug
Geographic location of the bug:  New Milford, CT
Date: 06/09/2019
Time: 01:10 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This big guy flew into me as I was walking by and clung to my shirt. I brushed him off and I may have killed him!
How you want your letter signed:  Jackie

Eyed Elater

Dear Jackie,
The Eyed Elater is harmless.  It is the largest Click Beetle in North America.

Subject:  Dont know who to report this to
Geographic location of the bug:  Las vegas nevada
Date: 06/07/2019
Time: 05:39 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Possibly an Australian redback. We have found. Brown and black widows brown recluses and I think we counted six out of the top 10 deadly spiders that are not supposed to be in Las Vegas Nevada so if you could help us identify this to make sure it’s not an Australian redback I would appreciate. Thank you for your time I sent two separate pictures of two separate spiders found in the backyard the first one is what I believe to be in Australian redback or a related species the second one not sure
How you want your letter signed:  Cory

Immature Western Black Widow

Dear Cory,
The image of the Spider that is missing four of its legs appears to show an immature Western Black Widow.  Here is a BugGuide image for comparison.  Immature individuals also exhibit the identifying hourglass marking on the ventral surface.  Upon maturing, the Western Black Widow loses its dorsal markings and becomes a glossy black spider with a red hourglass.  The other image is too blurry for an identification.