Subjec:  Winged Incect
Geographic location of the bug:  Mt Baldy, Ca
Date: 05/05/2019
Time: 11:43 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi, this website is so cool, anyways had this guy land on me on a hike, never seen him before. No clue what it might be
How you want your letter signed:  Ya boi

Square Headed Snakefly

Dear Ya boi,
Thanks for the compliment.  This is a very exciting posting for us.  Though we immediately recognized this as a Snakefly in the insect order Raphidioptera, we also recognized that is was different from other Snakeflies on our site.  We identified it as a Square Headed Snakefly in the genus
Negha on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “This is the only genus within the family Inocceliidae in North America.”  This is also the first posting on our site of a Square Headed Snakefly.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Any ideas
Geographic location of the bug:  Western Washington
Date: 05/07/2019
Time: 07:49 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This bug was located by my daughter at her grandparents. I’ve never seen it and neither have they and they’ve lived there for 18 plus years. We became very curious to what it may be but can’t find it through our research.
How you want your letter signed:  Curious Father

Elm Sawfly

Dear Curious Father,
This is an Elm Sawfly, a non-stinging member of the Order Hymenoptera, a group that includes Bees and Wasps.  According to the University of Wisconsin-Madison Master Gardener Program:  “The adults of sawflies tend to be inconspicuous, and look somewhat like wasps, but do not sting. They feed on pollen and nectar, so may be seen on flowers as well as their larval host plants. They are not very active, making only short flights in sunny weather, and resting on leaves otherwise. Many sawfly species are parthenogenetic; since they do not need to mate to reproduce, males are very rare even in species where males are known to occur.”

Thank you so much for the reply. My daughter will be excited to learn what she found. You rock.

Subject:  Beetle
Geographic location of the bug:  Crystal Falls MI
Date: 05/07/2019
Time: 07:26 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Please identify
How you want your letter signed:  Thank you

Eye Spotted Lady Beetle

We were able to identify this Eye Spotted Lady Beetle, Anatis mali, on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Unknown Beetle
Geographic location of the bug:  San Francisco Bay Area, California
Date: 05/10/2019
Time: 05:12 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found these bugs in my backyard and two of them have gotten into my house, I safely relocated them back outside but I want to know if they are dangerous or can infest my house and what kind of beetle it is.
How you want your letter signed:  To whom it may concern

Cockroach

You have Cockroaches.  This appears to be an Oriental Cockroach.  You may read more about them on BugGuide where it states their habitat is “Relatively cool, damp areas – basements, crawl spaces. Not usually found on higher floors of buildings.”

Subject:  I see these everywhere
Geographic location of the bug:  Southern Florida
Date: 05/07/2019
Your letter to the bugman:  I keep seeing these all over near my house and outside. Can’t identify it. Please help
How you want your letter signed:  Cory

Flattie

Dear Cory,
Spiders in the genus
Selenops are frequently called Flatties, and here is a BugGuide image for comparison.

Subject:  New species
Geographic location of the bug:  Ballarat
Date: 05/10/2019
Time: 06:36 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  What is this bug? Is it a new species?
How you want your letter signed:  Nate G

Mole Cricket

Dear Nate,
This is a Mole Cricket, and we probably have over 100 images of Mole Crickets on our site from all over the planet, including Australia.