Oriental Beetle 101: A Quick and Easy Guide to Identification and Control

The Oriental Beetle (Anomala orientalis) is a fascinating yet potentially troublesome insect native to Asia. Found in various colors ranging from solid black to mottled black and brown, the beetle grows up to ½ inch in length and resembles other invasive species like the Japanese beetle in its oval, top view shape 1.

In their natural environment, Oriental Beetles serve a valuable role in the ecosystem, keeping plant growth in check and providing a food source for animals. However, when introduced to new regions, they can prove to be quite destructive, damaging plants and trees. Learning how to identify and control these beetles will ensure a healthy balance in your area’s ecosystem.

Origin and Distribution

Eastern Asia

The Oriental beetle, scientifically known as Anomala orientalis or Exomala orientalis, is originally native to Asia. This pest can be found in countries like Japan, China, and Korea. The beetle is around ½ inch long and has an oval shape, with colors ranging from solid black to mottled black and brown, or even unmarked pale brown1.

Invasive Species in the United States

Oriental beetles were first discovered in the United States in the early 1900s, and have since spread to multiple states, including New York2. They are considered invasive species due to their potential to cause damage to turf, fruit, and vegetable crops. The range and activity of Oriental beetles, as well as their close relatives, the Japanese and Asiatic Garden beetles, have been expanding in recent years3.

Characteristics of Oriental Beetle

  • Oval shape
  • ½ inch long
  • Color range: solid black to mottled black and brown, almost completely unmarked pale brown

Comparison Table: Oriental Beetle vs. Japanese Beetle

Feature Oriental Beetle Japanese Beetle
Native Region Asia (Japan, China, Korea) Japan
Size Approximately ½ inch long Approximately ½ inch long
Shape Oval Oval
Color Black, brown, or unmarked pale Metallic green and coppery-brown

Physical Characteristics

Color and Markings

Oriental beetles (Anomala orientalis) have a diverse appearance when it comes to their color. They can be:

  • Solid black
  • Mottled black and brown
  • Almost completely unmarked pale brown

The elytra, or hard wing covers, often display these color variations and markings (source).

Size and Comparison to Japanese Beetle

Oriental beetles are relatively small, measuring about ½ inch long and oval in top view. When comparing the Oriental beetle to the Japanese beetle, there are some similarities and differences:

Feature Oriental Beetle Japanese Beetle
Size About ½ inch long Slightly larger than ½ inch long
Shape Oval-shaped Oval-shaped
Color Black to pale brown variations Metallic green, coppery brown
Larvae (grubs) appearance C-shaped white grubs C-shaped white grubs

Oriental beetles display more color variation, while Japanese beetles have a more distinct metallic appearance (source).

Life Cycle and Reproduction

Egg to Larva

The life cycle of the Oriental beetle (Anomala orientalis) begins when the mother lays small, spherical eggs, often in the soil near plant roots. These eggs hatch into larvae, a stage they share with other members of their family, Scarabaeidae. For example, both Oriental beetle larvae and Japanese beetle larvae are C-shaped white grubs that feed on plant roots, affecting plant health.

  • In spring, Oriental beetle eggs hatch into larvae
  • Larvae feed on plant roots, causing damage

Pupa to Adult

As the season progresses, the larval stage continues through summer until fall, around September. At that point, Oriental beetle larvae enter the pupal stage, transforming and overwintering in the soil. Upon emerging from the pupa in late spring or early summer, the adult Oriental beetles are ready to reproduce.

  • Larval stage lasts from spring through fall, until September
  • Pupal stage occurs during winter months

Comparison of Oriental Beetle and Japanese Beetle:

Features Oriental Beetle Japanese Beetle
Larval Shape C-shaped white grubs C-shaped white grubs
Larval Feeding Habits Feed on plant roots Feed on plant roots
Habitat Soil near plant roots Soil near plant roots
Time of Year for Adult Emergence Late spring/early summer Late spring/early summer

Short Characteristics:

  • Oval-shaped body
  • Color varies from solid black to mottled black and brown
  • Around ½ inch in length.

By understanding the life cycle and reproduction of the Oriental beetle, we can better monitor and manage the beetle’s impact on plants in their habitat. However, always ensure to follow guidelines and not to introduce diseases or chemicals that may harm other organisms in the environment.

Behavior and Diet

Feeding Habits and Damage

Oriental beetles (Anomala orientalis) are known for their diverse diet, feeding on various plants. They mainly consume grasses, fruit, and turfgrass1. Their feeding habits cause significant damage, as they feed on flower petals, foliage, and rootlets. Adult beetles chew on soft plant tissue, often leaving skeletonized leaves behind.

In contrast, beetle larvae cause damage by feeding on the root systems of turfgrass, often resulting in brown patches in lawns2.

Host Plants and Preferences

Oriental beetles have a wide range of host plants, with some common examples including:

  • Roses
  • Grapes
  • Raspberries
  • Oriental lilies

These beetles prefer plants with lush foliage and abundant flowers3. They are more active at temperatures above 70°F4; during daytime, they hide in the soil around their host plants. At night, they emerge to feed, causing most of their damage under the cover of darkness.

Comparisons of Oriental Beetle and Japanese Beetle

Features Oriental Beetle Japanese Beetle
Size and Shape ½ inch, oval-shaped ½ inch, oval-shaped
Color Black to pale brown, mottled Metallic green and copper
Feeding Habits Flower petals, foliage, rootlets5 Flower petals and leaves6
Damage from Larva Turfgrass root systems7 Turfgrass root systems8
Host Plants Roses, grapes, raspberries, Oriental lilies9 Roses, grapevines, fruit trees, crape myrtles10

Pest Management and Control

Chemical and Organic Methods

  • Insecticide: Chemical insecticides can be effective against Oriental beetle larvae. Apply in late summer or early fall to target the destructive larval stage.
  • Organic matter: Incorporating organic matter like compost can create an unfavorable environment for the beetles.

Pros of chemical methods:

  • Fast results
  • Easy application

Cons of chemical methods:

  • May harm non-target organisms
  • Can cause ecological imbalances

Pros of organic methods:

  • Environmentally friendly
  • Sustainable

Cons of organic methods:

  • Takes more time
  • Can be less effective

Pheromone Traps

Oriental beetle management can also involve pheromone traps. These traps utilize sex pheromones, attracting adult beetles. When the beetles are trapped, you can submerge them in soapy water, leading to their death.

Pros of pheromone traps:

  • Specific to target pests
  • Non-toxic

Cons of pheromone traps:

  • May attract more beetles
  • Needs regular maintenance

Beneficial Insects

Introducing beneficial insects can help control Oriental beetle populations. Examples include:

  • Nematodes: These microscopic worms feed on beetle larvae.
  • Predatory beetles: Specific ground beetle species can prey upon Oriental beetle eggs and larvae.

To optimize the use of beneficial insects, maintain a diverse garden and avoid using broad-spectrum pesticides.

Weather conditions also play a role in beetle management; Oriental beetles are more active during warm and dry periods.

Comparison table:

Method Pros Cons
Chemical Insecticide Fast results, easy application Harmful to non-target organisms
Organic Matter Environmentally friendly Less effective
Pheromone Traps Target-specific, non-toxic Attracts more beetles
Beneficial Insects Natural, sustainable Requires careful garden management

Impact on Agriculture and Gardens

Affected Fruits and Ornamental Plants

The Oriental Beetle (Anomala orientalis) is a scarab beetle found in the family Scarabaeidae, known for causing damage to agricultural fields and gardens. These beetles specifically target a variety of fruits and ornamental plants. Some examples of affected fruits include:

  • Cranberries
  • Strawberries

Examples of targeted ornamental plants are:

  • Hollyhock
  • Phlox
  • Petunias

Damage to Nursery Stock

Nursery stock, particularly in the New England region, can be significantly affected by Oriental beetle activity. The beetle’s larvae, commonly known as white grubs, feed on the roots of many plants, which can lead to the decline of overall plant health in nurseries.

Pros of Oriental Beetle control methods:

  • Reduces damage to fruits and ornamental plants
  • Protects nursery stock from root damage

Cons of Oriental Beetle control methods:

  • Can be expensive to implement
  • Some control methods may have unintended side effects on the environment or beneficial insects

Comparison table: Oriental Beetle vs. Japanese Beetle

Feature Oriental Beetle Japanese Beetle
Color Solid black to mottled brown Metallic green and copper
Size About ½ inch long Approximately ½ inch long
Affected Crops Cranberries, strawberries, etc. Over 300 different plant species
Larval Stage White grubs, C-shaped White grubs, C-shaped

Asian Lady Beetles vs Oriental Beetles

Similarities and Differences

Asian lady beetles and oriental beetles are both insects belonging to the beetle family, but they have distinct characteristics and roles in the environment. Let’s have a look at their similarities and differences:

Asian Lady Beetles Oriental Beetles
Appearance Oval, convex, 1/3 inch long, pale orange with 19 black spots on wing covers Oval, 1/4-1/2 inch long, dark in color
Feeding Habits Predators of aphids and other soft-bodied insects Feed on plant roots and foliage
Benefits Natural pest control for gardeners and farmers Not considered beneficial
Nuisance Factors Can enter homes through windows and doors in large numbers Can cause damage to lawns and gardens

Benefits and Nuisance Factors

Benefits

Asian lady beetles are beneficial insects to gardeners and farmers, as they are predators of aphids and other soft-bodied insects, effectively controlling their population. It is estimated that an adult lady beetle can eat 90-270 aphids per day.

On the other hand, oriental beetles do not provide any notable benefits to gardeners or farmers.

Nuisance Factors

Asian lady beetles can become a nuisance in the fall when they cluster around buildings, entering homes through windows and doors in large numbers to seek protected sites for the winter. They may also bite upon contact, causing discomfort.

Oriental beetles, though not commonly found indoors, can cause damage to lawns and gardens by feeding on plant roots and foliage.

To prevent Asian lady beetles from entering your home, it is recommended to:

  • Seal windows and doors using appropriate sealant
  • Fix any gaps or possible entry points on the west side of the building

With these brief comparisons, it’s clear that while both Asian lady beetles and oriental beetles belong to the beetle family, they have distinct differences in appearance, feeding habits, and their impact on our lives.

Footnotes

  1. Oriental Beetle | NC State Extension Publications 2
  2. GRUB ID: Oriental Beetle – Cornell University 2
  3. Scarab Beetle: Japanese, Oriental, and Asiatic Garden Beetles 2
  4. Asiatic Garden Beetle | NC State Extension Publications
  5. Oriental Beetle | NC State Extension Publications
  6. Managing Japanese beetle feeding | UMN Extension
  7. Oriental Beetle | NC State Extension Publications
  8. Managing Japanese beetle feeding | UMN Extension
  9. Oriental Beetle | NC State Extension Publications
  10. Managing Japanese beetle feeding | UMN Extension

Reader Emails

Over the years, our website, whatsthatbug.com has received hundreds of letters and some interesting images asking us about these insects. Scroll down to have a look at some of them.

Letter 1 – Oriental Flower Beetle from Hawaii

 

black beetle with white spots
Location: Waikiki Beach, HI
July 26, 2011 8:32 pm
I found a black beetle with white spots on the back. About the width of my thumb and the size of the upper digit of my thumb above the 10th floor on the balcony of my hotel on the beach of Waikiki.
It walked around with ease and flew quickly and strongly into the air above the balcony. Impressive.
I also heard a hard chatter kind of sound – perhaps wings vibrating? This just before it flew away but while still on the concrete surface.
Signature: Paul

Oriental Flower Beetle from Hawaii

Hi Paul,
This is some species of Scarab Beetle, but we did not have any luck matching it to any species found on Hawaii.  Interestingly, the very comprehensive Insects of Hawaii website only lists two scarabs, which we find highly unusual.  Since you are in Honolulu, there is a good chance this Scarab arrived with a tourist or with freight.  Hawaii is populated with many invasive exotic species.  We believe this Scarab may be in the subfamily Cetoniinae, the Fruit and Flower Chafers.  We continued to research and we found a matching image under Hawaiian Insects on BugGuide, and it is identified as
Protaetia orientalis.  The Entophile website discusses this Invasive Exotic import as having been introduced to Hawaii prior to 2002.  In another posting, Entophile cites the Bishop Museum regarding the Oriental Flower Beetle.  BugNation has some images of swarms of Oriental Flower Beetles eating fruit.

Thank you for the quick tracking on this one.  Sorry another invasive has found a home in Waikiki.  Interesting beetle though.

Letter 2 – Oriental Beetle

 

Subject:  Beetle
Geographic location of the bug:  Michigan
Date: 07/11/2019
Time: 05:45 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Was wondering what kind of beetle this is? Have Japanese beetles also.
How you want your letter signed:  Kristine Degrace

Oriental Beetle

Dear Kristine,
In addition to Japanese Beetles, you also have Oriental Beetles,
Exomala orientalis, which is pictured on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “native to E. Asia, adventive in NA (*NS-GA to ON-WI-*MO), and spreading.”

Letter 3 – Oriental Beetle on Squash and Tomatoes

 

Subject:  Beetles on squash and tomatoes
Geographic location of the bug:  Williamsburg, MA
Date: 07/19/2019
Time: 09:47 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi these beetles appeared overnight in my vegetable garden in Western Massachusetts, particularly on my tomatoes and squash. I’ve never seen them before and haven’t found them on the internet. Any ideas what they are and how I can get rid of them? Thanks in advance!
How you want your letter signed:  Laura Garcia

Oriental Beetle

Dear Laura,
This sure looks like the invasive, exotic Oriental Beetle,
Exomala orientalis, to us.  We do not provide extermination advice, but the CABI Invasive Species Compendium has some information you might find helpful.

Letter 4 – Oriental Flower Beetle from Hawaii

 

Subject: Beattle ID Please
Location: O’ahu, Hawai’i
December 17, 2012 10:04 pm
Found this bug today at my son’s school. Never seen one like it here on O’ahu.
Signature: GeoGerms

Oriental Flower Beetle

Dear GeoGerms,
We identified your Oriental Flower Beetle,
 Protaetia orientalis, thanks to our own archives.  According to Entophile, it was introduced to Hawaii prior to 2002 and it is now established.

Letter 5 – Oriental Flower Beetle in Hawaii

 

Subject: A beetle?
Location: Honolulu, Hawaii
November 11, 2016 10:06 pm
Just want to know if this kind of bug is known to bite?
Signature: Kim

Oriental Flower Beetle
Oriental Flower Beetle

Dear Kim,
The Oriental Flower Beetle,
Protaetia orientalis, is an introduced species in Hawaii that is considered an invasive species that feeds on fruit.  We would not rule out that it might bite, but its real threat to Hawaiians is not the threat of a bite, but the damage that is done to fruiting trees.

Authors

    by
  • Bugman

    Bugman aka Daniel Marlos has been identifying bugs since 1999. whatsthatbug.com is his passion project and it has helped millions of readers identify the bug that has been bugging them for over two decades. You can reach out to him through our Contact Page.

  • Piyushi Dhir

    Piyushi is a nature lover, blogger and traveler at heart. She lives in beautiful Canada with her family. Piyushi is an animal lover and loves to write about all creatures.

49 thoughts on “Oriental Beetle 101: A Quick and Easy Guide to Identification and Control”

  1. Might be called oriental flower beetle, I live in Waianae on Oahu and this beetle about one dozen
    were all over my ripening beefstake tomato fruits.

    Reply
  2. Might be called oriental flower beetle, I live in Waianae on Oahu and this beetle about one dozen
    were all over my ripening beefstake tomato fruits.

    Reply
  3. I live in Hawaii Kai and recently after heavy rains I noticed about 6-8 dead beetles close to where the rain gutter spout ends on my grass. So now, every time it rains heavily, I see these dead beetles. They look like the oriental flower beetle images posted. Weird part is I see them dead after heavy rain by the rain gutter spout. I don’t have any fruit trees or tomato plants…any comments?

    Reply
    • I hate those damn huge beetles — they eat every fruit there is. They swarm around my mangoes and eat the buds off of my avocado. Why isn’t the State more exited about these monsters? The state gets all worked up over some harmless lizard and then turns a blind eye to these.

      If they could be exterminated by rain-downspouts that would be a hell of a secret weapon!

      Reply
    • I hate those damn huge beetles — they eat every fruit there is. They swarm around my mangoes and eat the buds off of my avocado. Why isn’t the State more exited about these monsters? The state gets all worked up over some harmless lizard and then turns a blind eye to these.

      If they could be exterminated by rain-downspouts that would be a hell of a secret weapon!

      Reply
    • I too have them after a rain where are they coming from and why are they ending up dead? Is the nest on the roof? I never find them alive.

      Reply
  4. I live Nanakuli and I have a lot of these beetles at my house, it just sucks because these bugs was eating all our mangos. Now its gonna eat all our fruits before we get to. Kiss the fruits goodbye Hawaii!!!!

    Reply
  5. Still getting those bugs after it rains…some alive, most are dead on the grass close to the rain gutter spouts…will ask my neighbor if they see them on their mango tree. Hope they don’t ruin the mangoes in Hawaii.

    Reply
  6. I live on Maui and a few days ago I think its this oriental flower beetle , it flew in my car and i panicked, I thought it was a bumble bee at first cuz the buzzing sound, but it landed in the seat n I waa freaked out because I never seen anything like it then jus yesterday i seen swarms of it. Are they dangerous???

    Reply
    • The do not sting or bite, but if one flew into a car and freaked out the driver, it might cause an accident, so the might be considered indirectly dangerous.

      Reply
  7. I live in Kahului, Maui and just found three of these in my yard. I also work at the UHMC campus and have noticed a lot of these beetles on the campus.

    Reply
  8. I have seen this only in my apartment close to UH: Manoa. I think they fly in through the window but I live on the 18th floor so I’m not sure…Do these beetles infest homes? Once in a while I’ll find one and it will play dead until I stop touching it then it will start moving again and burrow itself into the carpet (still visible). Recently I found one in my bed when I lifted the sheets it fell out (hence the post). I am pretty sure they just get fly in through the window, or get blown in by the wind, but I just want to know just in case I have to do some pest control. Thanks.

    Reply
  9. i noticed them only recently…they are all dead that suddenly appeared after rain near our downspouts…thought we were being invaded by some unknown beatle…we live in hawaii kai

    Reply
  10. I live in Kahala. There are a lot of these Oriental Flower Beetles. I first noticed it two years ago. A mango skin was on the roof and when I turned it over, I counted 26 beetles that flew out of it. They also like to go on Palm blossoms. We catch several of them every day on our palm blossoms. Today I caught 13 of them.

    Reply
    • Just notice them in my garden on my mango tree and crown flower tree. Caught about 10. Live in Kapolei Kanehili Hawaiian Homestead. May be good protein…..

      Reply
  11. I live in Waianae, Hawaii on the island of Oahu, found this Oriental Beatle in my orchid plant. It was hanging onto a piece of Orchid Bark. I don’t have mango or any type of fruit trees in my yard nor any of my neighbors. Are they problematic to flower plants?

    Reply
    • According to Hawaii Nature Journal: “On Guam, where it is widespread, it has been known to feed on the flowers of papaya, coconut, betel nut, mango and corn, and may damage the flowers of these trees, resulting in fewer fruit.”

      Reply
  12. Ahank you for posting information about this beetle, since I had been very curious about it. It seems that this beetle is highly attracted to cigar smoke. If I’m on the golf course, beach, or wherever as soon as I light up this beetle seems to come from out of nowhere. It hovers in the smoke for a few seconds takes off and comes back a time or two I thought that was very interesting thanks again

    Reply
  13. I also live in Hawaii Kai, Mauka on Mariner’s Ridge and started noticing this beetle this year. I always find 3 or 4 dead in my pool skimmer. Today I noticed two latched on to the fronds of some very young Areca Palms. I don’t see them much during the day, never noticed them in my pool during the day, are they nocturnal? Are they feeding on my Areca Palms? They seemed to be.

    Reply
  14. They’re in Kailua now, too. Started noticing them several months ago. I was mortified. How do we get rid of them without poisoning my yard ?? I have a big mango tree, and other trees / plants that I love.

    Reply
  15. They are in Aiea. Found some on the neighbors lychee tree. Found some live and dead ones in my yard. How do you get rid of them?

    Reply
  16. This is the same thing happening to us what Alicia Kamahele wrote back in Apirl 8 and 21, 2014. When it rains it comes down from the rain gutter. We see lots of die ones off the walk way. In April we found about 30 dead ones. Now there is about a dozen there dead. We do not have any fruit trees or any vegetable plant, but the neighbor in the back have a two mango trees and Mac tree. The tree is close to our house. I hope this is nothing to worry about.

    Reply
  17. I see a comment about cigar smoke being an attractant for oriental flower beetles and wondered if you knew what kind of cigars the commentor was using (that attracted the beetles) ? I live on Maui (Wailuku) and have a very bad infestation…desperate to find a way to trap and rid myself of this pest. Please respond to: Boilrweldr@outlook.com
    Mahalo for your time.
    Aloha, Ken

    Reply
    • Follow-up to my post: What kind of sicar smoke are they attracted to? Do you know of any other attractants I can use to trap them? And, please correct email for response to: @twc.com.
      Aloha

      Reply
  18. I see a comment about cigar smoke being an attractant for oriental flower beetles and wondered if you knew what kind of cigars the commentor was using (that attracted the beetles) ? I live on Maui (Wailuku) and have a very bad infestation…desperate to find a way to trap and rid myself of this pest. Please respond to: Boilrweldr@outlook.com
    Mahalo for your time.
    Aloha, Ken

    Reply
    • Follow-up to my post: What kind of sicar smoke are they attracted to? Do you know of any other attractants I can use to trap them? And, please correct email for response to: @twc.com.
      Aloha

      Reply
  19. I read to get rid of compost piles, tall grass or anything they can burrow into. I started putting a mixture of chopped garlic, mild dish soap and water on my heirloom tomato plants – seems to help keep them off of those plants, without harming the plants or tomatoes. I know the beetles are chomping on my heliconia and avocado leaves.

    Reply
  20. Putting sandwich bags around my tomatoes to keep the slugs and birds (and I guess the beetles too now). I cut a hole in the bottom corners, so rain water can drain. Also put tin foil over the reddening tomatoes. Seems to do the job.

    Reply
  21. Just found one clinging to the cement wall at work here in Waikele , and found it to be an interesting bug , cause of it’s size , color, and patterns on it’s body. Being a bug person , I was surprised that it just clung to my finger and just hung around , usually other types of bugs will try to escape you . Thought it was a Coconut Beetle , glad it wasn’t ? We have traps here for that beetle on site . Hope we don’t see any !

    Reply
  22. I live in Spreckelsville, Maui. I have noticed very slow flying beetles for about a year now, in the light of a street light at night outside my home. I have also lately seem a few flying around and landing on my very mature palms. Today I noticed some of my palm leaves have turned yellow at the tips and one is completely yellow. Anyone think this oriental flower beetle is killing my trees?

    Reply
  23. My aunt and uncle in Michigan have a farm and every summer you can find dozens of these dead on the floor. During the summer months it gets really hot there so they decided to finish off the basement and make an extra bedroom down there so as in the summer time to sleep down there.. well it is very cool and dark in the basement and when they went down there to start doing the renovations to it there were hundreds of these flying around and dead on the floor and my aunt started stepping on them and swatting at them… FYI DO NOT STEP ON THEM OR SMASH THEM!!!! They are like a STINK BUG!!!!!! She had smashed sooo many that the house stuck for a looong time!!!!’… lol…. even if youjust smash 1 them smell lingers for a long while…So don’t do it!!!

    Reply
  24. Just found one of these on the side of my house. Ugly little spud! First I’ve seen here in lower Makakilo/upper Kapolei. I have one little baby lime tree. As a fruit eater, I will monitor for these regularly. Doing more research, but will also inform the city pest bubbas. Was concerned about coconut rhinoceros beetle, but not it. Any additional info from anyone would be appreciated. Mahalo!

    Reply
  25. Just found this beetle eating my lychee in Lihue. Fortunately they seem to be targeting the cracked brown fruit and leaving the whole red fruit alone. I am finding one , two or three in each cracked lychee.

    Reply
  26. I live Waialua, Oahu. These buggers are nesting in my gutter downspouts. I can hear them crawling around. Flushed them out with a hose and a bunch of beetle debris, roof grains and organic material came out. Plus a bunch of beetles. They eat all sorts of stuffs – loving the young lilikoi leaves at the moment.

    Reply
  27. My cat spotted one beetle then two, looks like they are copulating and then a third one appeared. I live on the 35th floor of a condo in Waikiki.

    Reply
  28. I just found this website too with even more history, saying the 1st beetle arrived on Oahu via military aircraft in the 1950s!
    https://idtools.org/id/beetles/scarab/factsheet.php?name=15220 I also read on another site that these beetles are raised commercially in Korea as a food that fights liver cancer. They are pretty and rather destructive beetles. Well established in Kapolei, Oahu about 8 yrs ago. To conserve water, my lawn had thick, moist turf. Great for a couple years until these guys started to dive into grass, crawl down and lay eggs! If you do any digging, especially where lawn has browned, you can find them. When my garden plants died in my raised bed, it was their grubs. My solution is back yard chickens to prep garden beds in Spring and clean up the compost pile. I keep a compost pile to attract them, roaches and centipedes for the chickens. There are still plenty beetles flying around, but it seems to help reduce their dammage. ????

    Reply
  29. I just found this website too with even more history, saying the 1st beetle arrived on Oahu via military aircraft in the 1950s!
    https://idtools.org/id/beetles/scarab/factsheet.php?name=15220 I also read on another site that these beetles are raised commercially in Korea as a food that fights liver cancer. They are pretty and rather destructive beetles. Well established in Kapolei, Oahu about 8 yrs ago. To conserve water, my lawn had thick, moist turf. Great for a couple years until these guys started to dive into grass, crawl down and lay eggs! If you do any digging, especially where lawn has browned, you can find them. When my garden plants died in my raised bed, it was their grubs. My solution is back yard chickens to prep garden beds in Spring and clean up the compost pile. I keep a compost pile to attract them, roaches and centipedes for the chickens. There are still plenty beetles flying around, but it seems to help reduce their dammage. ?

    Reply

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