Bugs
Location: Alabama
September 10, 2011 3:28 pm
I am trying to complete a highschool taxonomy project and I need help finding the common names of these bugs.
In some pictures there are several bugs, please identify them all. If you see the same species twice, please let me know. I have some more posts with more pics comming up. Thanks.
Signature: Calac64

High School Students wants to know "What's That Bug?"

bugs post#2
Location: Alabama
September 10, 2011 3:30 pm
I did not mention this in my last post, but my teacher recomende this site find identification.
Signature: Calac64

High School Insect Collection

Dear Calac64,
We believe that when your teacher recommended our website, it was not so that you would send your pictures to have our small staff do your homework for you.  We believe we were recommended as a resource that you could use to self identify the insects in your collection.

Ed. Note:  Calac64 sent a total of 4 emails with a total of 12 images requesting identifications.  There is no indication that Calac64 even attempted any identifications by providing a possible name for one of the insects.  If any of our readers would like to identify the insects in the photos, please feel free to post comments.

Thank you for that notification, I agree with your reasoning, but I did not mean to convey my request as you doing my homework.  My teacher just wanted us to identify the insects after we find them, and I did not think that she would mind me requesting help.  I apologize if I have conveyed my request in that fasion.  If you wish to, you can just not identify the insects, I don’t mind, plus I have already identified most of them.

Thank you for responding and clarifying your requests.  If you would like verification on any of your identifications, we will try our best to assist.

Location: Alabama

8 Responses to Identifications needed for high school project

  1. macawsj says:

    Looks like bugs for teenagers to figure out on their own (like you said)!

  2. sparks says:

    I would like to know what this insect is. I have seen them in houses here in Texas. They fly and are creepy

  3. sparks says:

    Thank you. My bug looks similar to this one. No white spot thou and flies. If any of ya’ll have knowledge of that bug. It is about 1 inch in size.

  4. ShopAtLuxe says:

    I just visited Alabama last week and came back to Michigan yesterday. That exact same bug landed on my arm and scared the bejezus out of me, because it was so creepy and I have never seen anything like it in the North part of the country.
    Here’s what I observed:
    -It’s black, and has a sharp pointy mouth like thing
    -It flies, that’s how it landed on my arm and then exited when I blew on it
    -Although it is technically the Spring season, March 20 has passed, in Alabama, everyone I spoke with repeatedly said that it was Winter. So although people were swimming outside in pools and in the Gulf of Mexico, there was very little new flower growth, with the exception of Azaleas. This led me to believe that this is a hardy bug, that lasts in colder temperatures of 50’s, relatively speaking for Alabama. (Cold in Michigan is -20 below zero Fahrenheit.)
    I also have a question for the entomologist and bug buffs, with the pincer type mouth, the obvious wings, and my assumption that this is a newly born, or unearthed bug, is it likely that this is a Flying Ant, of the male gender, that is a native of the Warmer climate, perhaps why I spotted it wanting to take a bite of my arm? Crickets don’t bite. I played with them constantly as a child, and found them to be quite friendly little creatures, along with the male’s wonderfully seductive gift of music! ? ? ? ?

    • bugman says:

      The insect used to illustrate this posting is a Field Cricket. Without an image, we would not like to speculate on what landed on your arm. Flying Ants have mandibles. Flies have mouths designed to pierce. Perhaps you were visited by a Black Horse Fly.

  5. ShopAtLuxe says:

    I just visited Alabama last week and came back to Michigan yesterday. That exact same bug landed on my arm and scared the bejezus out of me, because it was so creepy and I have never seen anything like it in the North part of the country.
    Here’s what I observed:
    -It’s black, and has a sharp pointy mouth like thing
    -It flies, that’s how it landed on my arm and then exited when I blew on it
    -Although it is technically the Spring season, March 20 has passed, in Alabama, everyone I spoke with repeatedly said that it was Winter. So although people were swimming outside in pools and in the Gulf of Mexico, there was very little new flower growth, with the exception of Azaleas. This led me to believe that this is a hardy bug, that lasts in colder temperatures of 50’s, relatively speaking for Alabama. (Cold in Michigan is -20 below zero Fahrenheit.)
    I also have a question for the entomologist and bug buffs, with the pincer type mouth, the obvious wings, and my assumption that this is a newly born, or unearthed bug, is it likely that this is a Flying Ant, of the male gender, that is a native of the Warmer climate, perhaps why I spotted it wanting to take a bite of my arm? Crickets don’t bite. I played with them constantly as a child, and found them to be quite friendly little creatures, along with the male’s wonderfully seductive gift of music! ? ? ? ?

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