How Long Do Roaches Live? Unveiling the Lifespan of These Persistent Pests

Cockroaches are known for their resilience and adaptability, making them a common pest in households and businesses worldwide. One factor contributing to their success is their lifespan, which varies depending on the species. For instance, German cockroaches, the most prevalent species in the United States, can live up to 9 months under favorable conditions source.

Different species of cockroaches exhibit varying lifespans and reproductive habits. Adult female German cockroaches can produce four to eight egg capsules in their lifetime source. Brown-banded cockroaches, another common species, live around 200 days and produce six to eight egg cases during their lives source. Understanding the lifespan and reproductive capabilities of these pests is crucial for effective cockroach management and control.

Cockroach Lifespan

Factors Affecting Lifespan

A cockroach’s lifespan depends on various factors such as species, temperature, and access to food and water. Some common species and their average lifespan are:

  • German Cockroach: 6-9 months
  • American Cockroach: 1-2 years
  • Oriental Cockroach: 1-1.5 years
  • Brown-Banded Cockroach: 3-11 months

Here’s a brief comparison table:

Species Average Lifespan
German Cockroach 6-9 months
American Cockroach 1-2 years
Oriental Cockroach 1-1.5 years
Brown-Banded Roach 3-11 months

For all species, development time from egg to adult ranges from 40 to 125 days. During their lifetime, cockroaches undergo three stages: egg, nymph, and adult. Females lay eggs contained within dark-colored egg cases, with each case containing between 16 and 50 eggs, depending on the species.

Cockroaches are resilient pests and can survive without food for a month. However, they will die in a week if deprived of water. Temperature also plays a vital role in their lifespan. Roaches can’t survive in cold temperatures, so warm environments provide favorable living conditions. Here are a few examples of how temperature affects cockroaches:

  • German cockroaches prefer temperatures around 80°F.
  • Oriental cockroaches can tolerate cooler temperatures, but will still avoid cold areas.

In conclusion, the lifespan of a cockroach depends on various factors like species, temperature, and access to food and water. These resilient pests can withstand harsh living conditions, making them difficult to eliminate.

Types of Cockroaches

German Cockroach

The German cockroach is one of the most common species found in the United States. They are typically 12 to 17 mm (1/2 to 5/8 inch) long and tan to light brown in color, with two dark brown stripes behind their head1. Some characteristics of the German cockroach include:

  • Primarily found indoors
  • Produce up to eight egg capsules in their lifetime2
  • Nocturnal activity

American Cockroach

The American cockroach is larger, measuring 1-1/4 to 2 inches (31-51 mm) long3. It is often called a palmetto bug. These cockroaches are darker in color and prefer moist, warm environments. Features of the American cockroach:

  • Found both indoors and outdoors
  • Less common than the German cockroach
  • Known for invading homes during extreme weather

Oriental Cockroach

Oriental cockroaches are smaller than the American ones and have a dark brown or black color. They mostly inhabit outdoor environments but invade homes searching for food and shelter4. Key aspects of the Oriental cockroach:

  • Predominantly dwell in outdoor areas
  • Seek out dark, damp spaces
  • Can emit a strong, unpleasant odor

Brown-Banded Cockroach

Measuring at about 5/8 inch (16mm) long3, brown-banded cockroaches are relatively small. They have a light brown color and distinctive banding on their wings. Details of the Brown-banded cockroach:

  • Prefer drier environments than other species
  • Are more commonly found on ceilings, walls, and furniture
  • Typically inhabit warm, humid areas

Other Cockroach Species

There are several other lesser-known species, such as the Asian cockroach and Australian cockroach. While not as widespread, these species still exhibit the adaptability and survival skills that define cockroaches. Comparing these various species:

Cockroach Species Size (length) Indoor/Outdoor Habitat Distinguishing Characteristics
German Cockroach 12 to 17 mm (1/2-5/8″) Indoor Dark brown stripes
American Cockroach 31 to 51 mm (1-1/4-2″) Both Larger, often called “palmetto bug”
Oriental Cockroach Similar to German Outdoor Dark color, strong odor
Brown-Banded 16 mm (5/8″) Indoor Banding on wings

Cockroach species can vary in size, color, habitat preference, and other characteristics but are universally considered pests.

Cockroach Life Cycle

Egg Stage

Cockroaches begin their life cycle as eggs, which are contained within a protective structure called an ootheca. Female cockroaches will produce:

  • 4 to 8 egg capsules during their lifetime
  • Each capsule contains approximately 40 eggs

The incubation period varies depending on the species, and females carry the egg capsule until it is about to hatch.

Nymph Stage

When eggs hatch, they release nymphs, which are baby cockroaches. These nymphs go through a series of developmental stages known as instars. Key points about nymphs include:

  • Nymphs are more numerous than adults
  • They molt multiple times before reaching adulthood

During the nymph stage, cockroaches mature and develop wings (if applicable). Their speed and ability to climb rough surfaces improve as they grow.

Adult Stage

Once nymphs have completed their molting process, they become adult cockroaches, which have a varied life expectancy depending on species and environmental factors. Adult cockroach features include:

  • Size ranging from less than 1/2 inch to almost 2 inches
  • Mostly nocturnal behavior
  • Feeding on a wide range of organic matter
  • Preference for moist, dark crevices when not foraging for food

Adult female cockroaches will produce oothecae, starting the life cycle anew.

Life Stage Characteristics Duration
Egg Contained in ootheca, female carries until hatching Species dependent
Nymph Molts multiple times, develops wings and improves mobility Species dependent
Adult Produces ootheca, nocturnal, feeds on organic matter Species dependent

Cockroach Infestations

Causes of Infestations

Cockroach infestations often occur when homeowners inadvertently provide food, water, and shelter for these pests. Roaches are attracted to readily available food sources, such as crumbs, spills, and unsealed pantry items. Additionally, they thrive in damp environments, so leaks or excess moisture can also attract them. Examples of conditions that can lead to an infestation include:

  • Improperly stored food
  • Dripping faucets or pipes
  • Cluttered or unkempt living spaces
  • Cracks and crevices in walls or floors

Roaches can enter a home through small openings in the structure, such as gaps around plumbing, cracks in the foundation, or improperly sealed windows. They reproduce rapidly, with females laying oothecae (egg cases) containing multiple baby roaches. A significant infestation can quickly develop if the conditions are favorable.

Prevention Tips

To help prevent cockroach infestations, homeowners can employ various strategies, such as:

  • Storing food in sealed containers
  • Cleaning spills and crumbs immediately
  • Fixing leaks and addressing moisture problems
  • Decluttering living spaces and eliminating hiding spots

Moreover, sealing entry points such as cracks, gaps, and damaged screens can limit roaches’ access to your home. Regularly inspecting your property for signs of an infestation and addressing issues promptly can help keep a roach problem under control.

Comparison of prevention tips:

Prevention Method Pros Cons
Food storage Reduces food sources for roaches Requires diligent upkeep
Cleaning Eliminates potential nesting areas Time-consuming
Home repairs Keeps roaches out of living spaces Can be costly
Regular inspection Allows early detection of infestations Requires vigilance

Implementing these prevention tips and maintaining a clean, well-maintained living space can go a long way in deterring cockroach infestations in your home.

Cockroach and Human Health

Cockroach-Related Allergies

Cockroaches are known to cause allergic reactions in some people due to the proteins found in their saliva, feces, and body parts. Common symptoms include:

  • Sneezing
  • Watery eyes
  • Nasal congestion

Cockroach-Related Asthma

Apart from allergies, cockroaches also contribute to asthma problems. Their presence can trigger asthma attacks in people who are already susceptible to the condition. Here are some factors relating to cockroaches and asthma:

  • Cockroach allergens are airborne and easily inhaled
  • Exposure to allergens can worsen existing asthma symptoms
  • High cockroach populations can increase the risk of asthma-related issues

Examples:

  • A person with known allergies might experience difficulty in breathing when exposed to cockroach allergens.
  • People living in buildings infested with cockroaches might have a higher incidence of asthma-related issues.

Comparison Table:

Factors Allergies Asthma
Trigger Cockroach allergens Cockroach allergens
Symptoms Sneezing, nasal issues Difficulty in breathing
Affected Individuals People with sensitivities Asthmatics
Prevention Cockroach control Cockroach control

It is worth noting that due to their open circulatory system, cockroaches can harbor and spread bacteria, which might not directly cause allergies or asthma but can affect overall human health. To minimize the risks associated with cockroaches, it is essential to maintain proper sanitation and control measures in and around living spaces.

Interesting Cockroach Facts

Cockroaches are fascinating insects with unique capabilities. One noteworthy fact is that they are adaptable and can survive on every continent except Antarctica.

Cockroach Life Cycle:

  • Egg
  • Nymph
  • Adult

A cockroach goes through three stages during its life cycle: egg, nymph, and adult. The eggs are contained within dark-colored egg cases, which can hold between 16-50 eggs, depending on the species. Once hatched, the young cockroaches are called nymphs and are more numerous than the adults.

Cockroaches exhibit remarkable survival skills.

  • Can live up to a month without food
  • Die within a week without water

Most roaches can go up to a month without food, but will die in a week if deprived of water.

Cockroaches are incredibly fast movers. They can travel at a speed of 50 body lengths per second when running.

Different cockroach species have varying features. For example, the Oriental cockroach is much darker in color compared to the other species, with wings that do not reach the end of their abdomen.

Comparison of some common cockroach species:

Species Size Color Wing Length
German 12-17mm Tan to light brown 1/2 to 5/8 inch
Oriental Intermediate Dark Shorter than the abdomen

Roaches have impressive reproduction capabilities. The German cockroach, for example, produces four to eight egg capsules during its lifetime, each containing numerous eggs. This reproductive behavior ensures a continuation of the cockroach population.

Footnotes

  1. Cockroaches and Schools | US EPA

  2. German Cockroach | Illinois Department of Public Health

  3. Cockroaches and Their Management – EDIS 2

  4. Cockroach Myths and Misconceptions

Reader Emails

Over the years, our website, whatsthatbug.com has received hundreds of letters and some interesting images asking us about these insects. Scroll down to have a look at some of them.

Letter 1 – Black Cockroach from Australia

 

Big, Black and Beautiful
Location: Queensland, Australia
March 11, 2011 6:11 pm
Hi guys,
I’m not sure of the ID on this one apart from it possibly being a Platyzosteria species. I often see wood roaches around the place but this is the first time I have ever seen one this big, if it is one, and out basking on a leaf of a sweet potato vine in my garden. Close to 2” long, and has some pretty awesome looking cerci/genitalia?
Rather beautiful don’t you think?
Signature: aussietrev

Cockroach

Hi Trevor,
Sorry for the delay, but we have a personal deadline this week that is eating into our posting time allotment.  Oz Animals identifies Cockroaches in the genus
Platyzosteria as Black Cockroaches.

Letter 2 – Boll's Sand Roach

 

Bug dragging young?
May 19, 2010
Hi.
I was hoping you could help with this. I unearthed it digging out a Hell-Strip in Austin Texas. It looks like a huge pill-bug but more “roachy”. And is that a baby it is dragging around behind it?
ESP
Austin, Texsa

Boll's Sand Roach

Dear ESP,
This fascinating creature is a female Boll’s Sand Roach, Arenivaga bolliana, a species represented on BugGuide by a few photographs.  The information page on BugGuide indicates:  “The downy females have no wings and burrow in the dust under houses and in natural rock shelters where they feed on packrat droppings.
”  This is not a Cockroach species that infests homes.  We also located the AllPet Roaches Forum that has some discussion on Boll’s Sand Roach.  This female is dragging her ootheca or egg case, a behavior pattern characteristic of most Cockroaches.

Thank you so much for the ID Daniel, really appreciated. Please follow up
on my blog, and my next post… I have linked to your services.
Cheers,
ESP.

Letter 3 – Brownbanded Cockroach

 

Subject: Bug found on Interior Wall..
Location: Connecticut
December 25, 2013 8:49 am
Never seen a bug crawling up my wall, pretty quick bugger too! Any way you can identify this? Trying to figure out where it came from and how.
Thank you
Signature: CB

Immature Cockroach
Brownbanded Cockroach

Hi CB,
This is an immature Cockroach, and we suspect if you have one, there are surely more.

Update:  December 16, 2014
We received a comment that this is a female Brownbanded Cockroach,
Supella longipalpa, and more information on the Brownbanded Cockroach can be found on the Penn State Entomology site where it states:  “Brownbanded cockroaches prefer warm and dry locations, such as near refrigerator motor housings, on the upper walls of cabinets, and inside pantries, closets, dressers, and furniture in general. They can also be found behind picture frames and beneath tables and chairs, and inside clocks, radios, light switch plates, doorframes, and dressers. It is common to find them hiding nearer the ceiling than the floor and away from water sources. Accurate identification is paramount to controlling brownbanded cockroaches. Control strategies for other cockroaches will not be efficacious for brownbanded cockroaches.”

Letter 4 – Austral Ellipsidion Cockroach from Australia

 

Subject: New bettle
Location: Australia NSW Harrington Park
September 14, 2016 11:19 pm
Dear big man I think I foun a new bettle species if not please send back a letter, it is an aboriginal coloured bettle with aboriginal patterns. It also has two pincer like red things near its abdormen or butt.
If it is new also send a letter back.
From Logs
Signature: Logs

Cockroach
Cockroach

Dear Logs,
We found a Getty Images image of your Cockroach nymph, but it only identified as “Arboreal cockroach, sub-order Blattaria.”  According to the Brisbane Insect site, the species is known as the Beautiful Cockroach or Austral Ellipsidion,
Ellipsidion australe, and this information is provided:  “Not all cockroaches are ugly. This Austral Ellipsidion Cockroach looks beautiful. Its body is orange-brown to dark brown with white patterns. Its thorax is dark brown with a good looking yellow around the edge. The cockroach adult is winged, with brown forewings covered the black and white abdomen. Male and female look almost the same. Nymphs have the similar body structure except wingless.”

Letter 5 – Australian Cockroach

 

Should I kill myself now, or what?
Dear Bugman,
Having just moved to Florida from the north I am TERRIFIED of getting a cockroach infestation in my apartment. Having said that, I moved down here and lived in a place where I saw two German Cockroaches on separate occasions. I moved into a new place about two months ago. Your web site helped greatly. Now this series of events has happened: a) found a cockroach slightly bigger than a German Cockroach but a dark red like an American Cockroach near my patio door, and killed it, this was after I had moved some boxes and while the lights were on; b) found some roach crap near my microwave days later; and c) caught the big dark red cockroach in this photo sneaking out from under the microwave tonight. I think the Intenet helped me identify this ugly bastard as an "Australian Cockroach." Evidently they aren’t as bad at infestations as Germans or Americans since they don’t get nearly the same press coverage. I haven’t seen any other evidence of roach activity anywhere in my apartment. Please help me if you can. What kind of cockroach is this? Do I have an infestation or just an annoying visitor or two? Can I expect a huge sack of eggs to break inside the outer walls of my microwave, unleashing a torrent of cockroaches I will never fully destroy? What should I do to prevent cockroaches from entering my home?
Floridian In Need

Dear Needy Floridian,
We agree with your identification. The Australian Cockroach, Periplaneta australasiae, is not as invasive as the German Cockroach. The pale stripes at the edge of the forewings are the distinguishing feature. According to BugGuide, they are a tropical or subtropical species that will feed on almost anything. We don’t really consider ourselves to be experts at intervention, but Don’t kill yourself.

Letter 6 – Australian Cockroach in Kent, UK

 

Subject: can you identyfy this large beetle
Location: hythe, kent
February 28, 2015 2:08 pm
Dear all
We found this bug in our bathroom , running down the door.
Can you help with his identity
Thanks Grant
Signature: G West

Australian Cockroach
Australian Cockroach

Dear Grant,
At first we were going to send a brief response that this is a Cockroach, but we decided the thoracic markings are so striking that we would attempt to identify the species of Cockroach you encountered.  After finding several similar looking images that only identified it as a Cockroach, we found the Suffolk Pest Control Company that identified it as an Australian Cockroach,
Periplaneta australasia., and that provided this information:  “Inspite of their exotic origins Australian cockroaches are making a home for themselves in the UK, where they can found in most major cities.”  Not confident that the Australian Cockroach is actually native to Australia, we found this information on BugGuide:  “Adult has thorax outlined in yellow with black/brown center marking somewhat like a sideways number eight. Differentiating Australian cockroaches from other species of Periplaneta requires identification of the narrow yellow mark along front outside edge of wings”, but nothing was written about the country of origin.  The garden is calling us from additional research at this time.

Hi Daniel
Thanks for your help. Am guessing we need to contact some form of pest control company as they seem quite dangerous.
Because we d found one , I suppose there are more so will get onto it straight away.
Thanks again
Grant

Letter 7 – Beautiful Cockroach from Australia: Austral Ellipsidion

 

Bug from Australia
Sun, Jan 18, 2009 at 4:56 PM
Never seen this before, found in front yard of my house on a Elm tree leaf, the photo doesnt do it justice it looks much more beautiful in real life thats why i ran into my house to grab the camera and it moves around so swiftly, we are in the middle of summer january 18
bkorpar
Melbourne Doncaster

Beautiful Cockroach
Beautiful Cockroach

Dear bkorpar,
According to the Insects of Brisbane website, this is a Beautiful Cockroach or Austral Ellipsidion, Ellipsidion australe. According to the site: “This Cockroach is active at day time, running freely on the leaves and flowers. Most other cockroaches are scavengers, they feed on almost everything. We are not exactly sure what this Austral Ellipsidion Cockroach feed on, but they are always found on plants, seldom on the ground. They are believed feed on pollen, honeydew and mould fungus.”

Letter 8 – Boll’s Sandroach with Ootheca

 

Subject: Is this some kind of roach?
Location: Harper, TX
October 20, 2012 4:45 pm
Never seen this one before. Looks like a roach from the underside, but it’s topside is like a giant flat doodle bug with fewer segments. It has a reddish ”tail”, maybe a female. It’s not ver clear from the photo. Burrowed in the grass/ground to hide.
Signature: K Bernsen

Boll’s Sandroach

Dear K Bernsen,
While you are correct that this Boll’s Sandroach is a Cockroach, it is not a species that infests homes.  This is a wingless female Boll’s Sandroach, 
Arenivaga bolliana, or another member of the genus.   Males, which are capable of flying, are frequently attracted to lights.  According to BugGuide:  “The downy females have no wings and burrow in the dust under houses and in natural rock shelters where they feed on packrat droppings.”  We believe the reddish “tail” is an ootheca or egg case.  The female will carry it about until she finds a suitable place to deposit it.

Female Boll’s Sandroach with Ootheca

 

Letter 9 – Brown Banded Cockroach

 

Subject: Help – Bug in appartment
Location: Philly
December 21, 2014 11:56 pm
Hi,
Recently, we keep finding these bugs in our apartment around 1-5am (once a week).
These things are very fast but I finally managed to catch of of them alive.
Signature: Jon

Brownbanded Cockroach
Brownbanded Cockroach

Dear Jon,
We believe we have correctly identified your Cockroach as a Brownbanded Cockroach,
Supella longipalpa, based on this image posted to BugGuide.  According to the Penn State Entomology site:  “Brownbanded cockroaches prefer warm and dry locations, such as near refrigerator motor housings, on the upper walls of cabinets, and inside pantries, closets, dressers, and furniture in general. They can also be found behind picture frames and beneath tables and chairs, and inside clocks, radios, light switch plates, doorframes, and dressers. It is common to find them hiding nearer the ceiling than the floor and away from water sources. Accurate identification is paramount to controlling brownbanded cockroaches. Control strategies for other cockroaches will not be efficacious for brownbanded cockroaches.”

Thanks Daniel, that looks so right.
I’ve contacted the apartment manager to send in an exterminator and have a look at it,
Happy holidays!
Jon

Letter 10 – Brown Widow eats Cockroach

 

Subject: Spider eating a cockroach in LA
Location: Los Angeles
August 19, 2013 6:57 pm
Hi,
We recently started renovations on our garage here in Los Angeles. I couldn’t help but take a picture of this spider eating a cockroach on the side of our garbage can. I can’t figure out what spider it is. Can you help? Thanks! Megan. (in Los Angeles).
Signature: Megan.

Brown Widow eats Cockroach
Brown Widow eats Cockroach

Hi Megan,
Your spider is an introduced Brown Widow,
Latrodectus geometricus.  According to BugGuide:  “World wide in the tropical zone. It was introduced in Florida and has since been observed moving north through Georgia, and into South Carolina; it has also been officially recorded in California, Alabama, Mississippi, and Texas.  Habitat Found around buildings in tropical climates.(1) However, it is an introduced species and is the most human-adapted of the species occurring in the South Eastern US. Its webs may occur anywhere there is sufficient space to make one. It may be extremely abundant on houses and other man-made structures (e.g., barns, fences, guard rails, bridges). It reproduces frequently and disperses rapidly, making it nearly impossible to control.”  As with other introduced species, which we consider Invasive Exotics, the Brown Widow might be contributing to a loss of species diversity by displacing native species where it has been introduced.

Letter 11 – Cockroach in the Dorm

 

Ew. Bug.
Wed, Oct 22, 2008 at 7:52 PM
So, I’m a sophomore college student in central Ohio. Until recently, I’ve enjoyed residing in the recently renovated dorm on campus. But about 2 or 3 weeks ago, these bugs started showing up, and have made my residence less enjoyable. The first time I found one, I figured it just hitched a ride on my back pack and jumped off when I set my bag down (that’s where I found it the first time – behind my back pack). Then I found another one when my parents picked me up for fall break. And, later, another one FLINGED itself at me while I was putting on make up (it missed, luckily, and landed on my vanity instead of me). A couple days later, I found ANOTHER ONE in front of my fridge. And just tonight, one flew by my head as I was practicing sight singing and landed on my piano.

Sorry the picture isn’t that great. My friend took it. She’s an English major – not a Photography major. There is a reason for that. The bug is probably about a half an inch (maybe smaller?) in length, brown, and smells when you squish it (sorry, bug lovers).

I am not a bug person. Any type of bug freaks me out (unless it’s tiny and cute – like a lady bug, or a very very very tiny spider). If you could tell me what kind of bug this is, and why it likes to hang out in my dorm room so much (my guess is that it wants some place warm to stay, since it’s getting colder outside. They weren’t showing up when it was 70-80 degrees outside – but I’m not an insect expert, so I wouldn’t know), and maybe what I could do – if anything – to keep it from coming back, that would be fantastic!
Thanks!
Laura
Dayton Ohio

Cockroach
Cockroach

Hi Laura,
Sorry to say, but you have Cockroaches in your dorm. Thanks for submitting a thoroughly charming and entertaining letter. Your friend should take a photo class to make friends in the darkroom and improve her photo skills.

Letter 12 – Cockroach Infestation

 

Subject: Little black bugs…EVERYWHERE
Location: Mesa, Arizona
January 26, 2014 5:30 am
Ok I am freaking out… I have lived in this apartment now for 14 months and I am having a massive bug issue! Now Had I did my research I would not have moved in here because this apartment complex is notorious for bed bug infestations! Lo and behold I am dealing with that issue. But that’s not what I have the question about today. Today I was able to finally catch one of these little buggers! I have no idea what they are, the office tells me that they are bed bugs but I’ve done my research and they don’t look like any Bed Bug photos online. They have taken over my house, I can’t take it anymore! They are all over my kitchen both bathrooms in the showers all over the walls, please can you guys tell me what these are?
Signature: pulling my hair out crazy!

Cockroach Nymph
Cockroach Nymph

Dear pulling my hair out crazy!,
This is a Cockroach nymph, which means you must also have larger, reproducing adults in your apartment complex.

Oh my god… Wow.
Thank you so much. My apartment complex told me they were bed bugs! I knew I had bed bugs but I didn’t think that’s what those were. I just need to figure out what I’m going to do now.
Thank you thank you thank you!
Abby

We find it quite odd that your apartment complex management is admitting to Bed Bugs, but not to Cockroaches.

Letter 13 – Cockroach laying Ootheca, we believe

 

Roach..
Location: in my living room ( Maine)
January 30, 2012 10:19 am
This is a colony of false death head roaches. I have had them for a year. They turn out a good product. Im used to the hard case of eggs that they deposit….but now i see this crazy thing…What is it? its soft like ..skin
Signature: Happy Haunting 😉

False Death’s Head Cockroach in captivity

Dear Happy Haunting,
We learned on the Worm Man website that False Death’s Head Cockroaches,
Blaberus discoidalis, are native to Mexico and Central America and they are raised as live food for other exotic pets.  In our opinion, this is a freshly laid ootheca or egg case that has still not hardened.

Authors

    by
  • Bugman

    Bugman aka Daniel Marlos has been identifying bugs since 1999. whatsthatbug.com is his passion project and it has helped millions of readers identify the bug that has been bugging them for over two decades. You can reach out to him through our Contact Page.

  • Piyushi Dhir

    Piyushi is a nature lover, blogger and traveler at heart. She lives in beautiful Canada with her family. Piyushi is an animal lover and loves to write about all creatures.

13 thoughts on “How Long Do Roaches Live? Unveiling the Lifespan of These Persistent Pests”

  1. Why not try the ultimate revenge? Cockroaches have been consumed in various places throughout history — admittedly, more for medicinal reasons than because they’re the tastiest bug out there. But they’re not so bad. Though cockroaches do have a waxy exterior coating to keep the pathogens out, a soaking in lemon juice cuts through that, and then you’re ready for a range of preparations! A very good way to overcome your fear is to consume the object of your fear, thereby removing its power.
    Dave
    http://www.slshrimp.com

    Reply
    • Hi Dave,
      According to BugGuide: “NOTE: It is recognized that this particular species of widow is most likely not medically significant (not an immediate medical concern to those who are bitten). (Net Ref (4)) The brown widow produces clinical effects similar to that of the black widow but the typical symptoms and signs being milder and tending to be restricted to the bite site and surrounding tissues.” BugGuide also notes: “The brown widow is an extremely timid spider which has rarely been reported to bite.”
      When we saw your name on the comment, we thought you might be writing to tell us that it is edible.

      Reply
  2. Brown Widows are new to our yard; I saw the first sign of them last year. I am quite familiar with Black Widows. There are a couple of differences I’ve noticed between the two. Black Widows like the darkest places they can find. I will see them on my tomato plants and rose bushes, but usually down at the very bottom or deep inside. Brown Widows live all through my tomato plants, and I just found their spiked egg-sacs at the very top of one of my rose bushes today. I wouldn’t say they live in broad daylight, but they certainly don’t need much shade to make them happy. I’ve also accidently watered some lines of webbing from Brown Widows coming down from the roof to my plants, and saw them quickly run down the thread in response. I’ve never observed this with Black Widows. Black Widows usually cower. Either the Brown Widows are more aggressive, or they just don’t have the instinct to know that the hose water is not a bug. I’m not afraid of either as long as I can see them; it’s the ones I don’t see that bother me. Outside, they are welcome. They seem to have arrived at the same time as the American Cockroaches in my yard. I’d never seen either of them before last year. I live in the suburbs of Los Angeles, in the San Fernando Valley.

    Reply
    • Thanks for that information. This image of an adult female Supella longipapla on BugGuide appears to have wings, and the image that was submitted does not look like it has wings.

      Reply
  3. Cockroaches should not be considered dangerous, but they are unpleasant and disadvantageous. Most people do not like to share their home with these creatures.

    Reply
  4. I’ve been following the brown widow in Tampa Bay for some years now. I keep finding them in places which all seem to have a common denominator:

    Under an outside metal railing.
    Inside an electrical box with a cover.
    Under a water fountain in an outdoor breezeway.
    In the doorjamb of an unused vehicle.
    Under a park bench(!).
    Under a garbage can handle.
    Under a casement window hinge.
    In a drafty old wooden garage.
    Inside a galvanized chain link fence post.

    All of these places are outside, but not in the direct rain. Usually they’re nesting, and I notice the spiny spherical egg sacks in their nests immediately or even first. There’s sometimes debris and detritus in the nest as it has the appearance of being abandoned, but when I look closer, I see a female inside doing some spider house work. Notice that all of these places are places where one is likely to put their hand or skin.

    Reply
  5. I’ve been following the brown widow in Tampa Bay for some years now. I keep finding them in places which all seem to have a common denominator:

    Under an outside metal railing.
    Inside an electrical box with a cover.
    Under a water fountain in an outdoor breezeway.
    In the doorjamb of an unused vehicle.
    Under a park bench(!).
    Under a garbage can handle.
    Under a casement window hinge.
    In a drafty old wooden garage.
    Inside a galvanized chain link fence post.

    All of these places are outside, but not in the direct rain. Usually they’re nesting, and I notice the spiny spherical egg sacks in their nests immediately or even first. There’s sometimes debris and detritus in the nest as it has the appearance of being abandoned, but when I look closer, I see a female inside doing some spider house work. Notice that all of these places are places where one is likely to put their hand or skin.

    Reply
  6. Dear Jon,
    I wanted to know if the Brown Banded cockroaches bite. I found roaches on my bed. The exterminator came and exterminated my kitchen and bathroom. That’s where I found them the most. After that they started coming in my room, on the furniture, on the floor and on the bed. I’ve noticed raised round red bumps on my hand, leg and arm. I called the exterminator to make sure it’s not bedbugs, But I wanted to know if roaches bite.

    Reply
  7. Dear Jon,
    I wanted to know if the Brown Banded cockroaches bite. I found roaches on my bed. The exterminator came and exterminated my kitchen and bathroom. That’s where I found them the most. After that they started coming in my room, on the furniture, on the floor and on the bed. I’ve noticed raised round red bumps on my hand, leg and arm. I called the exterminator to make sure it’s not bedbugs, But I wanted to know if roaches bite.

    Reply

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