Death's Head Hawkmoth Caterpillar from Namibia

Caterpillar
Location: Windhoek Namibia
February 8, 2012 7:29 am
Please help us identify the caterpillar in the photograph. We are not sure how voracious an appetite it has and what bug it will turn into.
We are conservation minded and love our garden so would also like to know how to keep it at bay if necessary
With grateful thanks
Signature: Rowena

Death's Head Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Dear Rowena,
This is the caterpillar of the Death’s Head Hawkmoth.  Interestingly, we just posted a photo of a Death’s Head Hawkmoth from Singapore.

5 thoughts on “Death's Head Hawkmoth Caterpillar from Namibia”

  1. We found a Devil’s head larvae alive and well yesterday (23/09/13) in Harwell, Oxfordshire. W have identified it from books and the internet and are positive it is a Devil’s Head Hawk Moth Larvae because of it’s features, size and colour, and it’s ‘squeak’! The horn is very hard and the larvae was very active and very powerful for it’s size, just over 4 inches. We discovered that when handled or (we guess) when it felt threatened it flicked it’s whole body quite visciously, maybe to scare off a potential predator or perhaps even it tries to impale predators with it’s yellow and black horn. We placed it back safely near a wood pile and bushes in a hope that it will pupate in the ground. I hope this information helps or is of interest.
    Oliver Cadman.

    Reply
  2. We found a Devil’s head larvae alive and well yesterday (23/09/13) in Harwell, Oxfordshire. W have identified it from books and the internet and are positive it is a Devil’s Head Hawk Moth Larvae because of it’s features, size and colour, and it’s ‘squeak’! The horn is very hard and the larvae was very active and very powerful for it’s size, just over 4 inches. We discovered that when handled or (we guess) when it felt threatened it flicked it’s whole body quite visciously, maybe to scare off a potential predator or perhaps even it tries to impale predators with it’s yellow and black horn. We placed it back safely near a wood pile and bushes in a hope that it will pupate in the ground. I hope this information helps or is of interest.
    Oliver Cadman.

    Reply

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