Clown Beetle: All You Need to Know for a Creepy-Crawly Adventure

Clown beetles, scientifically known as Histeridae, are unique and intriguing insects found in various environments around the world. These beetles are rather small, measuring just a few millimeters to under two centimeters in length. Known for their distinctive black or dark-colored, shiny appearance, clown beetles are commonly found in decaying organic matter and dung, where they play an important role in breaking down waste material and recycling nutrients back into the ecosystem.

As scavengers, they help keep ecosystems clean by consuming debris, insects, and other small arthropods. Interestingly, clown beetles can also be considered beneficial insects, as they prey upon pest species such as fly larvae. This makes them valuable components in natural pest management, particularly in agricultural settings.

One fascinating feature of clown beetles is their ability to swiftly fold their legs and antennae beneath their bodies when threatened, giving them a vastly different look from their usual appearance. This skill, combined with their unique features, make clown beetles a captivating subject for entomologists and insect enthusiasts alike.

Clown Beetle Overview

Classification and Identification

Clown beetles, also known as hister beetles, belong to the family Histeridae. They are part of the following classification:

  • Kingdom: Animalia
  • Phylum: Arthropoda
  • Subphylum: Hexapoda
  • Class: Insecta
  • Order: Coleoptera
  • Suborder: Polyphaga
  • Superfamily: Hydrophiloidea
  • No taxon: (series Staphyliniformia)

These beetles are generally small (1-10 mm) with a shiny black or metallic blue/green exoskeleton. Key characteristics include:

  • Oval, convex body shape
  • Short, clubbed antennae
  • Rigid, shortened elytra (wing covers)

Habitat and Distribution

Clown beetles can be found in various habitats, such as:

  • Decaying organic matter (e.g., carcasses, dung, and leaf litter)
  • Under stones and logs
  • In tree cavities and bark

Their distribution is widespread, with species found in North America and Asia.

Physical Characteristics

Elytra and Tergites

Clown beetles (Histeridae) have unique features on their bodies. Some noteworthy characteristics include:

  • Elytra: Hardened, protective forewings that cover the hindwings and abdomen
  • Tergites: Plate-like segments on the dorsal side of the abdomen

These features provide the beetle with defense against predators and environmental hazards.

Antennae and Pronotum

The antennae of clown beetles are distinctive and serve sensory purposes. Additionally, the beetle’s pronotum is a significant part of its exoskeleton. They are:

  • Antennae: Clubbed at the end with multiple segments, aiding in taste and smell
  • Pronotum: Shield-like structure that covers the head, helps protect the body

Color and Size

Clown beetles come in a variety of colors and sizes. Most commonly, they are:

  • Color: Shiny black or metallic green, giving them an attractive appearance
  • Size: Varies among species; some have elytra that are shorter than their abdomens, exposing their tergites

Comparing clown beetles with other beetles can provide better insight into their characteristics.

Property Clown Beetle Other Beetles
Elytra Hardened and protective Similar
Tergites Exposed in some species Usually concealed
Antennae Clubbed, multi-segmented Varies
Pronotum Shield-like, covering head Varies
Color Shiny black, metallic green Varies
Size Varies among species Varies

The physical characteristics of clown beetles not only make them unique among insects but also contribute to their adaptability and survival in various environments.

Life Cycle and Reproduction

Egg and Larvae Development

Clown beetles, also known as Hister beetles, are a family of over 3,900 species found throughout the world1. The life cycle of clown beetles starts with eggs, which are laid by females in various locations. After hatching, the larvae go through several development stages2. Some features of the larvae include:

  • Soft bodies
  • Creamy-white color
  • Strong mandibles for feeding

Clown beetle larvae share similarities with other arthropod larvae. Both have segmented bodies and undergo molting during growth1. Also present during this stage are the beetle’s distinctive spiny appendages1.

Mating and Egg Laying

Adult clown beetles mate to reproduce2. Female beetles lay their eggs in different environments depending on the species2. Some key points regarding their reproduction include:

  • Females lay numerous eggs
  • Clown beetles undergo complete metamorphosis2
  • The entire life cycle takes several weeks to months2

Here’s a brief comparison of reproductive aspects in Clown beetles and other arthropods:

Aspect Clown Beetles Other Arthropods
Reproduction method Mating Mating (mostly)
Egg hardness Varies Soft to hard shells
Maternal care None Varies
Life cycle duration Weeks to months2 Varies

Clown beetles have a fascinating life cycle that contributes to their unique characteristics, making them a remarkable family of beetles.

Feeding Behavior

Predatory Feeders

Clown beetles, also known as Hister beetles, are a diverse group of insects with over 3900 species found worldwide1. They are known for their shiny yet sculptured surfaces and spiny appendages1.

  • Predatory feeders
  • Adapted for scavenging and hunting

Clown beetles are primarily predatory feeders, meaning they hunt and consume other insects and small organisms1. One of the reasons they are considered predatory feeders is their adaptation for scavenging and hunting, which allows them to effectively prey on other insects1.

Diet and Prey

A clown beetle’s diet varies depending on the species and its habitat. The primary sources of food typically include:

  • Dung2
  • Carrion3
  • Ants1
  • Other insects1

Some clown beetles specialize in feeding on dung, while others gravitate toward carrion (the decaying flesh of dead animals)23. In some cases, they also consume ants and other insects as part of their diet1.

Comparison Table: Clown Beetle Diet

Food Source Benefits Drawbacks
Dung Abundant, widespread Limited nutrients
Carrion Rich in nutrients Scavenger competition
Ants Diverse diet Protection from ant colonies
Other insects Varied diet Predator competition

The diet of the clown beetle makes it an essential part of the ecosystem. By consuming dung, carrion, and various insects, these beetles help control insect populations and contribute to the decomposition process.

Unique Behaviors

Playing Dead

Clown beetles exhibit a fascinating behavior known as playing dead. When threatened, these beetles instantly stop moving and tuck in their legs and antennae, mimicking a dead insect. This defense mechanism helps deter predators and increases their chance of survival.

Night Activity

Clown beetles are predominantly nocturnal creatures. They are most active during nighttime, which allows them to search for food and mates while avoiding potential predators. Being active at night offers several advantages such as reduced competition and more efficient use of resources.

  • Key features:
    • Playing dead when threatened
    • Active during nighttime
Clown Beetle
Behavior Playing dead
Activity Predominantly nocturnal (night)

Ecological Relationships

Myrmecophiles and Inquilines

Clown beetles, also known as Hister beetles, have an interesting relationship with ants and termites. Some species are myrmecophiles, which means they live in close association with ants. A subfamily of clown beetles called Haeteriinae are known for their myrmecophilous behavior.

Inquilines are another group of clown beetles that live within the nests of their host species, like termites.

  • Myrmecophiles: live closely with ants
  • Inquilines: live in termite or ant nests

Examples of myrmecophile clown beetles include:

  • Haeterius ferrugineus
  • Haeterius cinctus

Examples of inquiline clown beetles include:

  • Termitoxeninae subfamily members

Termite Colonies

Clown beetles also have connections with termite colonies. Some species play a role in these colonies as predators or even scavengers. Members of the Termitoxeninae subfamily are known as termite inquilines, living inside termite nests, and often feeding on termite eggs.

Feature Myrmecophiles Inquilines
Habitat Ant nests Termite nests
Host Species Ants Termites
Diet Varied, including ants Termite eggs
Examples Haeterius ferrugineus, Haeterius cinctus Termitoxeninae members

By understanding the ecological relationships between clown beetles and their host species, we can gain insights into their behavior and learn more about the fascinating world of these beetles.

Role in Forensic Investigations

Clown beetles play a significant role in forensic investigations. They help in determining the time of death of a victim.

These beetles are attracted to decomposing bodies. As a result, their presence on a corpse can provide valuable information. Shorter development cycles in Clown beetles mean that they can provide a more accurate estimation of the time of death compared to other insects.

For example, when investigators find Clown beetles on a body, they can estimate how long the person has been dead. This information is crucial in piecing together the events that led to the victim’s death.

Here’s a brief comparison table of Clown beetles and other insects used in forensic investigations:

Insect Speed of Development Accuracy in Time of Death Estimation
Clown Beetle Fast High
Blow Fly Moderate Moderate
Flesh Fly Slow Low

In conclusion, Clown beetles are of great importance in forensic investigations. Their presence on a body, coupled with their fast development cycles, make them a reliable tool in estimating the time of death for a victim.

Additional Information

GBIF

The Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF) is a useful resource for discovering information about Clown Beetles. It provides data on:

  • Species occurrences
  • Distribution

For example, you can find details about the specific species Histeridae, which contains over 3,900 species.

Other Resources

The University of Texas at Austin features an article that offers insights regarding Clown Beetles, including:

  • Appearance
  • Habitat
  • Behavior

Other useful resources for further reading:

Don’t hesitate to consult these resources for more information on Clown Beetles and related species, as well as their ecological roles and importance.

Footnotes

  1. Featured Species: Clown Beetle – University of Texas at Austin 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

  2. Beetle Life Cycle | Ask A Biologist 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

  3. The Hidden Harm in Feeding Your Local Wildlife 2

Reader Emails

Over the years, our website, whatsthatbug.com has received hundreds of letters and some interesting images asking us about these insects. Scroll down to have a look at some of them.

Letter 1 – Clown Beetle with Phoretic Mites

 

Beetle with babies
Location: Hudson Valley NY
November 8, 2011 3:49 pm
Found this during the freak October snowstorm. This was during a power outage so I had to light it with a flashlight, otherwise I would have had better pictures.
What is it? Have never seen one before. It was a beautiful glossy black.
Signature: Bugged in NY

Clown Beetle with Mites

Dear Bugged in NY,
Your letter probably deserves much more research than we have the time for right now, so we will be brief.  These are not baby beetles.  They are Mites, and we suspect they are phoretic Mites that are using the beetle as a means of transportation to get from one food source to another.  The beetle is a Clown Beetle in the genus
Hololepta.  You can view BugGuide for additional information on Clown Beetles.  Earlier this year, we received another image of a Clown Beetle with Phoretic Mitesand the Mites were identified as  “Neolobogynium americana (family Diplogyniidae). Adults are phoretic on Hololepta beetles.”

Clown Beetle with Phoretic Mites

 

Letter 2 – Clown Beetle

 

Beetle???
Hi,
Hope your still working this site. I have a bug i found in Southern Alberta Canada, could be a *”Broad-toothed Stag Beetle”.* but i dont think it is. If you can, please let me know what this very flat `beetle` might be. see attached 4 pictures. they are not that great cause of bad lighting and he wouldnot stop moving 🙂 oh well. Thanks,
Danny

Hi Danny,
Your beetle is actually a Clown Beetle in the genus Hololepta, in the family Histeridae. You can find more photos on Bugguide.

Letter 3 – Clown Beetle

 

What’s this beetle?
I live in north central West Virginia. I found this beetle trapped in a sink. It’s very shy, pulling its legs up underneath it’s body and playing dead at any movement. Despite the camera flash reflections, the beetle is actually an extremely flat black, which is why I had trouble getting a decent exposure. Hopefully there’s enough detail for someone to make an identification. Thanks.
Douglas Locke

Hi Douglas,
This is a Clown Beetle in the Genus Hololepta. BugGuide has some great photos of this interestingly shaped predatory beetle.

Letter 4 – Clown Beetle

 

Subject: Unknown stump decayer!!
Location: Wellington, CO
September 22, 2012 10:54 pm
While investing our cottonwood stump, we pulled off some of the bark and found this little fellow!! Details, 3 mm in length, 2 mm in width, 1 mm when flat against the trunk!!
I’ve been through the Bug Guide but still have not found it.
I will be out collection some for taking additional photos with a ruler to ensure measurements.
I do have additional full size photos if required.
Signature: Fish Seal

Clown Beetle

Dear Fish Seal,
The size and resolution on two of the images you submitted were so small as to be useless for identification purposes.  Thankfully you did submit one closeup image.  Our email program can accept large files which enables us to crop and to provide the highest web resolution possible for our readership.  Images that have been reduced in size prior to submission often result in inferior quality once we have posted them.  This is a Clown Beetle in the family Histeridae, and according to BugGuide, depending upon the species, their habitat includes:  “dung, carrion, decomposing fungi, under bark, in ant nests, forest litter, flood debris, treeholes, bird nests, mammal/reptile burrows, at sap flows, under wrack on beaches, and on sandy beaches.”  The closest match we were able to find on BugGuide is
Platylomalus aequalis.  BugGuide indicates that the habitat is:  “Found under bark. Dillon and Dillon(1) state that it is most common under the bark and logs of poplar and cottonwood.”  That is consistent with your sighting. 

Letter 5 – Clown Beetle

 

Subject:  flat black beetle w large jaws
Geographic location of the bug:  Northeastern Washington State, USA
Date: 08/27/2021
Time: 09:23 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Anyone know what this beetle is? Very strange because it is so flat. With the big jaws, I would guess it might be some kind of underbark tree eater, but I’ve never seen one like this and can’t find it in any bug book or online. Invasive species? It is about the size of the tip of my pinkie. Was on the garage door in the backyard. There are various trees around: large ponderosa pines, Chinese elms, crabapple, mock orange bushes, lilacs, wisteria vines, fruit trees, poplar, cottonwood, mountain ash, birch, ash, and maples. Was found in late July. Weather has been record hot in the upper 90s-110 F and very dry and smoky from wildfires. It also had a tiny stowaway on its back (parasite?). Weird.
How you want your letter signed:  Jen Childress

Clown Beetle

Dear Jen,
Thanks so much for including a lateral view so our readership can see how flat a Clown Beetle really is.  We believe your Clown Beetle is in the genus
Hololepta.  Your habitat suspicions are confirmed on BugGuide where it states:  “Members of the nominate subgenus under bark of decaying hardwoods; members of the subgenus Iliotona in rotting vegetation incl. cactus, agave, and palms.”

Clown Beetle

Letter 6 – Clown Beetle and Mites

 

Flat Black Beetle and friends
Location: North East Illinois -Chicago area
July 25, 2011 6:13 pm
Hi Mr. Bugman,
I found this lovely little creature and some of his friends taking a nap with my 5 year old today. I was wondering if you could tell me what type of beetle he is and if I should have any concerns of infestation or disease. If you look at the picture closely you will see tiny little bugs (the size of a grain of sugar), one on the beetle’s back and one in the background. Are these babies or another type of bug? Upon initial examination of the beetle there were 6 or so of these little guys crawling on him. Any information or insight to what these are would be much appreciated. Thank you in advance!
Signature: concerned mom

Clown Beetle and Mite

Dear Concerned Mom,
We identified you beetle as a Clown Beetle in the genus
Hololepta on BugGuide which indicates they are found “under bark of decaying hardwoods,” and “Adults and larvae eat other insects.”  We don’t think you have to worry about your five year old, but the real mystery is how a beetle that is found in rotting wood found its way into the nursery along with some of his friends.  This image from Bugguide shows mites in association with the Clown Beetle, and the commentary indicates that Mites are frequently found with Clown Beetles.  BugGuide indicates that two species are found in the Northeast, and here is the description for differentiating between the two:  “In the northeastern U.S., and in Ontario and Quebec, the two species are H. lucida and H. aequalis. H. lucida has a long striation along the edge of each elytra. In H. aequalis this striation is abortive, starting at the base but extending only 1/4 the length of the elytra or less.

Clown Beetle

Thank you so much for the response and your time!  I appreciate the information.

Letter 7 – Clown Beetle from Canada

 

Subject: Thin black insect with pinchers
Location: London Ontario Canada
May 10, 2016 6:42 pm
HI there, found this little guy in my hallway. He can tuck all his limbs in to be protected too. The pinchers appear to be at the front or head of the insect. Thanks for your help.
Signature: Does not matter.

Clown Beetle
Clown Beetle

This unusual beetle is a Clown Beetle in the genus Hololepta.

Thanks a lot for your help. I have never seen these where I lived before.
Jason

Letter 8 – Clown Beetle with Phoretic Mites

 

Subject: Infested Beetle
Location: grand rapids michigan
May 15, 2015 11:21 pm
I found this beetle on a log after dark. Its about the size of an index fingernail and just about as flat as one. The thing that I found really interesting is that its belly is covered with what appear to be aphids. At first I thought they were eggs or offspring but they really look like aphids, and they don’t resemble their host whatsoever. It doesn’t move much and seems content to just sit there… Hopefully you find this as interesting as I do.
Signature: dave

Clown Beetle
Clown Beetle

Dear Dave,
This very distinctive Beetle is a Clown Beetle, probably in the genus
Hololepta, and it is carrying Phoretic Mites, Neolobogynium americana, that use the mobility of the beetle to be transported from location to location to gain access to food.

Clown Beetle (ventral view) with Phoretic Mites
Clown Beetle (ventral view) with Phoretic Mites

Reader Emails

Over the years, our website, whatsthatbug.com has received hundreds of letters and some interesting images asking us about these insects. Scroll down to have a look at some of them.

Letter 1 – Clown Beetle with Phoretic Mites

 

Beetle with babies
Location: Hudson Valley NY
November 8, 2011 3:49 pm
Found this during the freak October snowstorm. This was during a power outage so I had to light it with a flashlight, otherwise I would have had better pictures.
What is it? Have never seen one before. It was a beautiful glossy black.
Signature: Bugged in NY

Clown Beetle with Mites

Dear Bugged in NY,
Your letter probably deserves much more research than we have the time for right now, so we will be brief.  These are not baby beetles.  They are Mites, and we suspect they are phoretic Mites that are using the beetle as a means of transportation to get from one food source to another.  The beetle is a Clown Beetle in the genus
Hololepta.  You can view BugGuide for additional information on Clown Beetles.  Earlier this year, we received another image of a Clown Beetle with Phoretic Mitesand the Mites were identified as  “Neolobogynium americana (family Diplogyniidae). Adults are phoretic on Hololepta beetles.”

Clown Beetle with Phoretic Mites

 

Letter 2 – Clown Beetle

 

Beetle???
Hi,
Hope your still working this site. I have a bug i found in Southern Alberta Canada, could be a *”Broad-toothed Stag Beetle”.* but i dont think it is. If you can, please let me know what this very flat `beetle` might be. see attached 4 pictures. they are not that great cause of bad lighting and he wouldnot stop moving 🙂 oh well. Thanks,
Danny

Hi Danny,
Your beetle is actually a Clown Beetle in the genus Hololepta, in the family Histeridae. You can find more photos on Bugguide.

Letter 3 – Clown Beetle

 

What’s this beetle?
I live in north central West Virginia. I found this beetle trapped in a sink. It’s very shy, pulling its legs up underneath it’s body and playing dead at any movement. Despite the camera flash reflections, the beetle is actually an extremely flat black, which is why I had trouble getting a decent exposure. Hopefully there’s enough detail for someone to make an identification. Thanks.
Douglas Locke

Hi Douglas,
This is a Clown Beetle in the Genus Hololepta. BugGuide has some great photos of this interestingly shaped predatory beetle.

Letter 4 – Clown Beetle

 

Subject: Unknown stump decayer!!
Location: Wellington, CO
September 22, 2012 10:54 pm
While investing our cottonwood stump, we pulled off some of the bark and found this little fellow!! Details, 3 mm in length, 2 mm in width, 1 mm when flat against the trunk!!
I’ve been through the Bug Guide but still have not found it.
I will be out collection some for taking additional photos with a ruler to ensure measurements.
I do have additional full size photos if required.
Signature: Fish Seal

Clown Beetle

Dear Fish Seal,
The size and resolution on two of the images you submitted were so small as to be useless for identification purposes.  Thankfully you did submit one closeup image.  Our email program can accept large files which enables us to crop and to provide the highest web resolution possible for our readership.  Images that have been reduced in size prior to submission often result in inferior quality once we have posted them.  This is a Clown Beetle in the family Histeridae, and according to BugGuide, depending upon the species, their habitat includes:  “dung, carrion, decomposing fungi, under bark, in ant nests, forest litter, flood debris, treeholes, bird nests, mammal/reptile burrows, at sap flows, under wrack on beaches, and on sandy beaches.”  The closest match we were able to find on BugGuide is
Platylomalus aequalis.  BugGuide indicates that the habitat is:  “Found under bark. Dillon and Dillon(1) state that it is most common under the bark and logs of poplar and cottonwood.”  That is consistent with your sighting. 

Letter 5 – Clown Beetle

 

Subject:  flat black beetle w large jaws
Geographic location of the bug:  Northeastern Washington State, USA
Date: 08/27/2021
Time: 09:23 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Anyone know what this beetle is? Very strange because it is so flat. With the big jaws, I would guess it might be some kind of underbark tree eater, but I’ve never seen one like this and can’t find it in any bug book or online. Invasive species? It is about the size of the tip of my pinkie. Was on the garage door in the backyard. There are various trees around: large ponderosa pines, Chinese elms, crabapple, mock orange bushes, lilacs, wisteria vines, fruit trees, poplar, cottonwood, mountain ash, birch, ash, and maples. Was found in late July. Weather has been record hot in the upper 90s-110 F and very dry and smoky from wildfires. It also had a tiny stowaway on its back (parasite?). Weird.
How you want your letter signed:  Jen Childress

Clown Beetle

Dear Jen,
Thanks so much for including a lateral view so our readership can see how flat a Clown Beetle really is.  We believe your Clown Beetle is in the genus
Hololepta.  Your habitat suspicions are confirmed on BugGuide where it states:  “Members of the nominate subgenus under bark of decaying hardwoods; members of the subgenus Iliotona in rotting vegetation incl. cactus, agave, and palms.”

Clown Beetle

Letter 6 – Clown Beetle and Mites

 

Flat Black Beetle and friends
Location: North East Illinois -Chicago area
July 25, 2011 6:13 pm
Hi Mr. Bugman,
I found this lovely little creature and some of his friends taking a nap with my 5 year old today. I was wondering if you could tell me what type of beetle he is and if I should have any concerns of infestation or disease. If you look at the picture closely you will see tiny little bugs (the size of a grain of sugar), one on the beetle’s back and one in the background. Are these babies or another type of bug? Upon initial examination of the beetle there were 6 or so of these little guys crawling on him. Any information or insight to what these are would be much appreciated. Thank you in advance!
Signature: concerned mom

Clown Beetle and Mite

Dear Concerned Mom,
We identified you beetle as a Clown Beetle in the genus
Hololepta on BugGuide which indicates they are found “under bark of decaying hardwoods,” and “Adults and larvae eat other insects.”  We don’t think you have to worry about your five year old, but the real mystery is how a beetle that is found in rotting wood found its way into the nursery along with some of his friends.  This image from Bugguide shows mites in association with the Clown Beetle, and the commentary indicates that Mites are frequently found with Clown Beetles.  BugGuide indicates that two species are found in the Northeast, and here is the description for differentiating between the two:  “In the northeastern U.S., and in Ontario and Quebec, the two species are H. lucida and H. aequalis. H. lucida has a long striation along the edge of each elytra. In H. aequalis this striation is abortive, starting at the base but extending only 1/4 the length of the elytra or less.

Clown Beetle

Thank you so much for the response and your time!  I appreciate the information.

Letter 7 – Clown Beetle from Canada

 

Subject: Thin black insect with pinchers
Location: London Ontario Canada
May 10, 2016 6:42 pm
HI there, found this little guy in my hallway. He can tuck all his limbs in to be protected too. The pinchers appear to be at the front or head of the insect. Thanks for your help.
Signature: Does not matter.

Clown Beetle
Clown Beetle

This unusual beetle is a Clown Beetle in the genus Hololepta.

Thanks a lot for your help. I have never seen these where I lived before.
Jason

Letter 8 – Clown Beetle with Phoretic Mites

 

Subject: Infested Beetle
Location: grand rapids michigan
May 15, 2015 11:21 pm
I found this beetle on a log after dark. Its about the size of an index fingernail and just about as flat as one. The thing that I found really interesting is that its belly is covered with what appear to be aphids. At first I thought they were eggs or offspring but they really look like aphids, and they don’t resemble their host whatsoever. It doesn’t move much and seems content to just sit there… Hopefully you find this as interesting as I do.
Signature: dave

Clown Beetle
Clown Beetle

Dear Dave,
This very distinctive Beetle is a Clown Beetle, probably in the genus
Hololepta, and it is carrying Phoretic Mites, Neolobogynium americana, that use the mobility of the beetle to be transported from location to location to gain access to food.

Clown Beetle (ventral view) with Phoretic Mites
Clown Beetle (ventral view) with Phoretic Mites

Authors

    by
  • Bugman

    Bugman aka Daniel Marlos has been identifying bugs since 1999. whatsthatbug.com is his passion project and it has helped millions of readers identify the bug that has been bugging them for over two decades. You can reach out to him through our Contact Page.

  • Piyushi Dhir

    Piyushi is a nature lover, blogger and traveler at heart. She lives in beautiful Canada with her family. Piyushi is an animal lover and loves to write about all creatures.

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