Currently viewing the category: "Worms"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Strange creature–land or sea?
Location: Anna Maria Island, Florida
March 25, 2017 5:47 am
We were walking the beach on Anna Maria Island in Florida when we came upon this fellow. It was right on the wet sand where the waves come up. Couldn’t tell where he came from or where he was going. Any ideas?
Signature: Nan

Bristle Worm

Dear Nan,
This Bristle Worm is actually an Annelid marine worm.  We found this matching image on Matthew Meier Photo and another on Florida Sportsman.    

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Parasite in stool
Location: USA, Egypt, Germany
March 1, 2016 12:50 pm
Hello! I’m hoping you can help me and see what this parasite is. It is white when exposed to air and dries. It is hard, almost like a twig, sometimes with a whip tail on the back and almost looks segmented but doesn’t appear to be the same as a tapeworm. Some sections of it splinters off, possibly male and female sexual productive pieces within the same worm. I’m not sure. It was found in human feces by the dozens. It can be roughly half inch long or longer. It does seem to break apart somewhat easily. I lived in Egypt for a year coming back about 7 months ago to the USA. It could have been caught at either location. Also, spent a night in Germany while traveling between. Thank you so much!
Signature: SarahD

"Worm" in Stool Sample

“Worm” in Stool Sample

Dear SarahD,
We do not have the necessary credentials to diagnose human parasites nor diseases, and we would urge you to see a professional for a diagnosis.  We cannot tell is this is an organism or if it is roughage.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknown Slug from Mount Santubong, Sarawak, Borneo
Location: Santubong NP, Sarawak, Borneo
April 14, 2015 11:47 am
Hi. Recently i went hiking at Mount Santubong National Park at Sarawak, Borneo, using the Summit Trail. I encounter this pretty blue black with white strip/bands worm on a tree trunk. It has a split in the middle too. As I’m a zoology student, I’ve ask around (lecturers etc) and they could only ensure me that it was not a platyhelmintes but some slug. I’m not sure about the elevation, but it was found after some 2280 m along the trail. And since I’ve no known experts to ask and my curiosity is giving me sleepless nights, I would like to try my luck here. It would be great if you know what this slug is. Thanks.
Signature: Tan, C.F.

Hi. I’ve missed to input some details. Santubong NP is a tropical rainforest and the slug is about 5cm long,1 cm width. Thanks.

Planarian

Planarian

Dear Tan, C.F.,
This is not a Slug which is a shell-less mollusc.  This is a Planarian or Flatworm.  We located a very similar looking image on Photographers Direct, but alas, it is not identified as to its species.
  A video on Siam Answer does not provide an identification either.  A similar looking image on Project Noah is identified as a Hammerhead Worm, possibly in the genus Bipalium.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Long blue worm
Location: Dickson, Tn (near Nashville)
July 22, 2014 4:52 pm
Found this worm hanging in an oak tree on July 20 by a silk thread. It is 5-6 inches long and iridescent in the sunlight. Can’t find any info about it, hoping you can help. Thanks.
Signature: Carole

Blue Worm:  Hoax or Real???

Blue Worm: Hoax or Real???

Dear Carole,
We have no idea what this is, but it does not look natural and it appears to have been hung by a human.

Blue worm

Blue worm

So sorry to bother you.  I came to the same conclusion you did  this afternoon as I got more curious and decided to get a step ladder out and touch it.  Turns out it is a fishing lure.  I still have no idea how it got into a tree in my back yard.  My yard is fenced with no gate and I have several dogs (they are friendly).  I hung a chandelier on the next branch over not long ago and the worm was not there then.  I live alone and do not fish.  It is now a new mystery.  Thank you so much for your time.  A friend sent me to your site…it is really interesting.  Again sorry for sending you on a wild goose chase.   Carole

Don’t worry Carole.  Your submission prompted a robust dialog in our comment section and led to some nice links of “real” blue worms in various parts of the world.

Detail of Blue Worm

Detail of Blue Worm

 

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Flatworm from Peru
Location: Peru; near Iquitos
March 13, 2014 5:52 pm
I know this is not exactly a “bug”. However I d be very glad if u d be able to help me to identify this.. flatworm. Thanks for any suggestion 🙂
Signature: Jiri Hodecek

Planarium

Planarium

Hi again Jiri,
When we were contemplating the subtitle of Daniel’s Book, The Curious World of Bugs, we settled upon “the mysterious and remarkable lives of things that crawl” because “Bug” is a generic term, despite the fact that True Bugs are in the suborder Heteroptera.  If it crawls, we have room for it on our site.  Flatworms, including Planaria, are in the class Turbellaria, and when we attempted to research this identification for you, we discovered a nearly identical image on Stock Photography that interestingly was also taken at Iquitos, Peru.  Alas, it is not identified further than the class Turbellaria.  Another unidentified individual from the Andes in Peru is pictured on Age PHotostock.

Hello, yeah I guess its quiet impossible to ID it better, thank you! 🙂
Jirka

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Hi WTB….we have removed our lawn in the backyard and are in the process
of re-landscaping. Today, I noticed these little mounds of dirt. I seem to
recall that these might be made not by ants, but by bees. These mounds are
everywhere! We are in Eagle Rock…
Hope all is well!
Best,
Brenda Rees
Editor
Southern California Wildlife

Worm Casings???

Worm Castings???

Hi Brenda,
We do not believe these are caused by Bees.  We suspect they might be Worm Castings.  See Scotty’s Place and  News Times for similar images.  News Times states:  “The little mounds are actually earthworm castings. Recent rains have been helped plants stressed by drought, but more soil moisture and cool temperatures increased earthworm activity” and we did just have a good soaking last week.  The same image is used on Horticulture.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination