Currently viewing the category: "Tiphiid Wasps"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Curious gathering of hymenopterans
These guys congregate on the roots of my vanda orchids in central Florida every year. Who are they and what do they want? I am very impressed by your website and the service that you provide. As an amateur botany and entomology student for the past few decades, I have a great appreciation for the effort required by your admirably positive contribution to the information highway. Excellent work! Thanks,
Jeff Smith

Hi Jeff,
This is a group of male Tiphiid Wasps in the genus Myzinum. We are including a comment Eric Eaton provide for a similar aggregation earlier in the year.

Update: (07/10/2007) Eric Explains
Daniel:
The wasps in the image are all males. Males of many kinds of wasps form “sleeping” aggregations like that depicted in the image. It may also be that these male wasps form “leks,” meaning they occupy a small area (lek) that the females will visit to select a mate. While the genus of these wasps certainly is Myzinum, species determination is difficult even with specimens, and certainly cannot be concluded from a photo alone.
Eric

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

A BIG WASP. DUNNO
RON D. HERE AGAIN FROM CENTRAL ILLINOIS. I SAW THIS LARGE WASP AND TOOK IT’S PICTURE. IT’S ABOUT 1 1/4″ LONG AND QUITE PRETTY. HAVE ANY IDEA?? I’M SURE YOU DO.
Ron

Hi Ron,
This appears to be a Tiphiid Wasp in the genus Myzinum, possibly the Five Banded Tiphiid, Myzinum quinquecinctum.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

what is this???
I live in northern MI and this is the first time I have ever seen this insect. It(they) are bunched together on my young pampas grass. Do they sting, should I take measures to exterminate them? Please help me… Thank you very much.
Louise McCloskey

Hi Louise,
After requesting assistance from Eric Eaton, we scoured BugGuide pages and located the Five Banded Tiphiid, Myzinum quinquecinctum, but there isn’t much explanation of this behavior. Hopefully Eric Eaton will provide something. The life cycle information provided on BugGuide states: “Life Cycle Larvae are parasitoids of white grubs (scarab larvae), especially May Beetles, Phyllophaga . Female lays one egg per grub in soil. Larvae hatches, penetrates host, first feeding on non-essential tissues, later feeding on essential organs and killng host. Pupae overwinter in soil and adults emerge in early summer, with one generation per year.” This indicates these are not social wasps, so the aggregation behavior is intriguing.

Update: (07/10/2007) Eric Explains
Daniel:
The wasps in the image are all males. Males of many kinds of wasps form “sleeping” aggregations like that depicted in the image. It may also be that these male wasps form “leks,” meaning they occupy a small area (lek) that the females will visit to select a mate. While the genus of these wasps certainly is Myzinum, species determination is difficult even with specimens, and certainly cannot be concluded from a photo alone.
Eric

Update: (07/10/2007) Five-banded Tiphiid from Michigan
I am also from Northern (Lower) Michigan, and I have been seeing congregations of these insects for a couple of years now in the late summer, normally on leafy indigenous grasses (the pampas grass from the inquery fit well.) It’s nice to see someone else curious about them, and I’m happy that I can add them to my numerous “natural” pest removal measures living in my neighborhood (I’ve grown out an acre of “prairie” in my back yard to foster habitat for everything from toads to dragonflies, monarchs to tiphiids… apparently.) Anyway, they never seem to be doing anything in these gatherings (not mating nor feeding on the grasses,) and I never bothered them… so they never bothered me. I just wanted to lend credence to their congregal nature, even if they are just “hangin’ out” with some grass. (Far more drug-referenced than I was shooting for…) Thanks for the always enlightening read,
Weston Tulloch

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Thorn mimic?
Hi What’s That Bug,
I’m pretty good with identifying bugs in my backyard, but this one has me stumped. I found it on my washing, and was only able to get the one shot before it vanished. The closest Google can get me is a “Thorn-mimic Tree-hopper” but (a) they’re not meant to be here in Australia and (b) I can’t find any info about them whatsoever! Any help you can give would be much appreciated. Also, something else for your site: a (female) Australian wingless flower wasp.
Cheers,
Jennifer

Tree HopperFlower Wasp


Hi Jennifer,
Your unknown Homopteran is one of the Tree Hoppers, many of which mimic thorns. Perhaps it is an introduced species. We love your photo of the flightless Flower Wasp. Eric Eaton added this information: ” The flightless flower wasp is likely a female tiphiid wasp (family Tiphiidae) of some kind, though I’ve never seen a metallic one!”

Hi! First of all I have a postive ID for one of your pix The “wingless flower wasp” is Diamma bicolor see the wiki page here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blue_ant.
Peter

Update: (01/11/2007)
Dear Bugman,
I enjoyed visiting your site. It really doesn’t compete with BugGuide.net, since you have posted lots of foreign insects that they bar from that site. For example, you have some really nice photos of the primitive treehopper Aetalion (which is tropical). I thought you might like to know about the following:
(2) The “Thorn mimic” from Australia is actually a spittle bug (which they call a froghopper) of the genus Philagra.
Thanks for helping to spread an interest in Homoptera. We need to encourage the amateur.
Andy Hamilton

Update: November 21, 2010
We have just re-identified this beauty on a posting today as a Blue Ant,
Diamma bicolor, and you may see more information on Oz Animals.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination