Currently viewing the category: "Thynnid Wasps"
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Subject:  Some kind of wasp?!
Geographic location of the bug:  Palm Springs, CA
Date: 06/11/2019
Time: 08:04 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi, I’m wondering if this is some kind of Wasp? Perhaps a bee 🤷‍♀️ I found it inside my house. But haven’t been able to identify what it is. Seems like the butt is skinnier than most wasps & it’s about an inch long. Moves very quick too. Definetly has a stinger. Also I did free it from the bag after I took pics. (The second photo is of its under body)
How you want your letter signed:  Alyssa

Thynnid Wasp

Dear Alyssa,
This appears to be what in the past we have classified as a Tiphiid Wasp in the genus
Myzimun, but there has apparently been some reclassification of the genus.  Now the genus Myzimun is classified in the family Thynnidae according to BugGuide.  This is a male Wasp and male Wasps are not able to sting.  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae are parasitoids of white grubs (scarab larvae), especially Phyllophaga and other Scarabaeidae, and to a lesser extent Cicindelinae. Adults take nectar, mostly from Asteraceae and Apiaceae” and “Used in turfgrass pest management.”  Because of your submission, Daniel is going to have to do some reclassification in the archives and move many formerly identified Tiphiid Wasps into a new family category Thynnid Wasps.

Thynnid Wasp

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Subject: Cicada killer? or Yellow Jacket?
Location: Tampa, FL
October 2, 2012 9:34 pm
I just took this picture minutes ago on my back patio. This insect is parked on the edge of the cat food bowl and is happily posing as long as I needed. It’s still there, but I’m thinking that I need to get it outside in the yard for survival. I have looked through a lot of images and I’m leaning toward Cicada Killer, but the markings are a bit different. It’s Oct. 2nd at 10pm in Tampa, Florida.
Signature: Shell K

Tiphid Wasp

Dear Shell,
This appears to us to be a Tiphid Wasp in the genus
Myzinum, most likely a female based on this description posted to BugGuide:  “Females are robust, with short, curled antennae and heavy hind femora (“thighs”). Males are very slender with long, straight antennae and a prominent curved “pseudostinger” at the tip of the abdomen.”  In a previous posting to our website, we posted this description from BugGuide, “A slender, shining black wasp, with yellow crossbands. Males are more slender than the females and have an upturned black hook at the end of the abdomen. There are 5 yellow bands on the abdomen of the female (the second is broken in the middle) and 6 narrow, more regular ones in the male. Both head and thorax are marked with yellow. Legs of the males are strongly yellow, but they are reddish in females. Wings are brown.“   However, we cannot locate that citation at its source any longer.  We are relatively certain the species if the Five Banded Tiphid Wasp, Myzinum quinquecinctum.

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Whats this bug?
Location: Gaines, Michigan
July 24, 2011 11:01 am
These wasp looking bugs cloud around our yard, they never seem to land they just fly in circles. We caught one and it is less than an inch long, and it has weird antennas. They just appeared this month, please help!
Signature: Alan Rodgers

Five Banded Tiphiid Wasp

Hi Alan,
This is a male Five Banded Tiphiid Wasp,
Myzinum quinquecinctum.  According to BugGuide:  “A slender, shining black wasp, with yellow crossbands. Males are more slender than the females and have an upturned black hook at the end of the abdomen. There are 5 yellow bands on the abdomen of the female (the second is broken in the middle) and 6 narrow, more regular ones in the male. Both head and thorax are marked with yellow. Legs of the males are strongly yellow, but they are reddish in females. Wings are brown.”  This is not an aggressive species, and males form “Bachelor Parties” like this one we posted in 2007.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Ed. Note: Moments after posting this letter, WTB? received a comment that chastised us for making negative remarks.  Please let us know if we have failed in our mission to educate by adding your own comment.

Whats this bug
Location: Florida
November 5, 2010 4:24 pm
I was just wondering what kind of bug this was. I got home from school and it was under my shirt??? But I have never seen one before.
Signature: Dont make no diffrence

Five Banded Tiphiid Wasp

Dear Dont make no diffrence,
We surely hope you were not sending this email immediately after your English class because there is no evidence of grammatical retention.  In the interest of contributing to your knowledge of science and your appreciation of nature, we researched your request and we have determined that this is a male Five Banded Tiphiid Wasp,
Myzinum quinquecinctum, which you may verify on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide, the Five Banded Tiphiid Wasp is:  “A slender, shining black wasp, with yellow crossbands. Males are more slender than the females and have an upturned black hook at the end of the abdomen. There are 5 yellow bands on the abdomen of the female (the second is broken in the middle) and 6 narrow, more regular ones in the male. Both head and thorax are marked with yellow. Legs of the males are strongly yellow, but they are reddish in females. Wings are brown.”  Male wasps are incapable of stinging.

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Help identifying this “long skinny bee”?
June 10, 2010
Hello,
These flying insects just began to appear last week. I have some children’s toys (inflatable pool, large molded plastic slides, large molded plastic playhouse) and these insects just appear to be swarming around them. There’s about 15-20 bugs around each toy and they never appear to really land on them, they just fly around them. I looked inside the playhouse and under the slides and couldn’t find any nests. It has been very hot and humid, 90+ degrees lately. The insects look like long skinny bees, and they don’t fly like a wasp. I’m no expert, but it looks like a stinger poking out of the end of the body. I found a dead one in the kiddy pool and attached some pics.
Thanks!
Hernando, Mississippi (northwest mississippi)

Five Banded Thynnid Wasp

You have Five Banded Tiphiid Wasps, Myzinum quinquecinctum, a solitary wasp that sometimes forms aggregations of males like this example on BugGuide.  Of the genus BugGuide indicates “Adults found on flowers, take nectar” and “Larvae are parasitoids of white grubs (scarab larvae), especially May Beetles, Phyllophaga. Female lays one egg per grub in soil. Larvae hatches, penetrates host, first feeding on non-essential tissues, later feeding on essential organs and killng host. Pupae overwinter in soil and adults emerge in early summer, with one generation per year.”  Of the species, BugGuide indicates:  “Males are more slender than the females and have an upturned black hook at the end of the abdomen.”  Based on that description, we believe your specimen is a male, and male wasps cannot sting.  Eric Eaton ponders on a BugGuide posting:  “Is it possible male wasps are social because they have no defense mechanism, like a stinger, thus need ‘group’ protection?

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination