Currently viewing the category: "spider wasps"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Tarantula hawk?
Geographic location of the bug:  Highlands of Chiriqui, Rep of Panamá
Date: 07/07/2020
Time: 04:21 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  We saw this approx 2 inch wasp? scuttling across a spare lot on our community today. We do see tarantulas reasonably often and wondered if it was a female hunting for a host. Is there any way to differentiate between a male or female? Never seen another one in our 8 years in Panamá, the colours looked beautiful in the sunshine. Thanks, Carol
How you want your letter signed:  Carol

Spider Wasp

Hi Carol,
We are very confident this is a Spider Wasp in the family Pompilidae, but we cannot state for certain that it is a Tarantula Hawk.  Your individual resembles this image posted to FlickR.  The hunting behavior you witnessed indicates this is likely a female.  Males do not hunt for spiders, and they can generally be found nectaring.

Spider Wasp

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Spider wasp
Geographic location of the bug:  Wilderness, South Africa
Date: 03/08/2020
Time: 02:47 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Thank you for posts that helped us to identify this wasp in our garden today. It was carrying a spider and defended its catch aggressively
How you want your letter signed:  Debbie

Spider Wasp

Dear Debbie,
This is indeed a beautiful Spider Wasp, but alas, we don’t see the Spider.  It looks very similar to this beauty in our archives.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Is this a spider wasp?
Geographic location of the bug:  Conyers GA
Date: 09/24/2019
Time: 04:07 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Just wondering what type of bug this is. It was dragging a very large spider as it went along.
How you want your letter signed:  Belinda

Spider Wasp and prey

Hi Belinda,
This is definitely a Spider Wasp.  Based on this BugGuide image, it appears to be
Entypus unifasciatus. The prey appears to be a Fishing Spider in the genus Dolomedes, and according to BugGuide:  “Females dig a burrow that ends in a terminal chamber off of the side of a mammal burrow or large crack in the ground. The serrations on the hind tibiae are used to aid the movement of soil out of the burrow entrance. The position in which the egg is laid is unknown. Larvae feed on one large spider and, as in all Pompilids that have one generation per year, overwinter as pupae.”  Most images of this Spider Wasp are with prey that are Wolf Spiders like this BugGuide image, but Fishing Spiders surely constitute “one large spider.”  Perhaps an expert in Spider Wasps will be able to provide comments regarding the prey.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Tarantula Hawk
Geographic location of the bug: Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
Date: 08/01/2019
Time: 10:26 AM EDT
Daniel was out working in the yard when he spotted a large, metallic green wasp well over 1 1/2 inches in length.  Alas, there was no camera handy and the wasp quickly flew off after running on the ground for a few seconds with an agitated style and its wings quivering.  Upon some research, and comparing images on The Natural History of Orange County and on BugGuide, Daniel believes it was a Tarantula Hawk, possibly
Pepsis mexicana, and that is why this image from our archives is being used to illustrate this new posting.

Tarantula Hawk

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Spider wasp and prey
Geographic location of the bug:  Charleston, Illinois
Date: 05/15/2019
Time: 01:11 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Saw you were looking for a image of this spider and its prey. Just a cell phone picture but shows key features.
How you want your letter signed:  Christopher S

Spider Wasp and Wolf Spider Prey

Dear Christopher,
Thanks so much for submitting your awesome image of a Spider Wasp,
Entypus unifasciatus, and its Wolf Spider prey.  The Wolf Spider will not be eaten by the Spider Wasp.  She feeds on nectar from flowers, and the paralyzed Wolf Spider will provide fresh food for a larval Spider Wasp which will eat its paralyzed meal alive.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  lage wasp like
Geographic location of the bug:  Suriname, South America
Date: 02/17/2019
Time: 08:53 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi i live in Suriname and never came across this bug before. What is it?
How you want your letter signed:  Marlon

Tarantula Hawk

Dear Marlon,
This appears to be a Tarantula Hawk in the genus
Pepsis, or a closely related genus.  Female Tarantula Hawks prey upon Tarantulas and Trapdoor Spiders, stinging them to paralyze them.  The paralyzed Tarantula is buried after the female Tarantula Hawk lays an egg.  When the egg hatches, the larva feeds on the still living, but paralyzed Tarantula.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination