Currently viewing the category: "Scoliid Wasps"
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Subject: Wasp or Bee
Location: Port Saint Lucie, Florida
April 30, 2017 6:57 pm
I found this insect resting with 4 others in the early morning on Salvia coccinea. I have tried to id it from books and internet, the closest seems to be Scarab Hunter, however I do not believe this is large enough at about 1-1.25 inches.
I photograph insects and id them to post on my Instagram @thedailybug with common and scientific names.
Thank you for your help. Your page is a great assistance.
Signature: Laurel Robertson

Scarab Hunter: Scolia nobilitata

Dear Laurel,
This is indeed a Scarab Hunter Wasp, and we believe we have correctly identified it as
Scolia nobilitata based on this and other BugGuide images.  According to BugGuide, it is a “Small scoliid with dark wings, abdomen dark with 4-6 light yellow/orange spots” and that is consistent with your observations.  The University of Florida has a nice paper on Scoliid Wasps of Florida and they provide this description:  “Variation: Body length is 10 to 15 mm. Segment 1 rarely with faint yellow spots, and those on segments 2 and 3 are sometimes very faint. Segments 4 through 7 may be dark mahogany to black.”  According to BugGuide data, sightings in Florida begin in May, so your individual was a bit early this year.

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Subject: Scarab Hunter Wasp?
Location: Orlando Florida
April 2, 2017 8:41 pm
Not sure of the ID on this one. It almost looked to be gathering pollen which I know wasps don’t do. Has three yellow dots on thorax. Photographed on a purslane flower.
Signature: Cledry

Scarab Hunter Wasp

Dear Cledry,
We agree that this is a Scarab Hunter Wasp in the family Scoliidae.  We believe that based on the resemblance of BugGuide images of
Campsomeris trifasciata to your individual, and by its range which includes Florida, that we have a proper identification.  We would not rule out that it might be Campsomeris plumipes, which is also represented on BugGuide.

Scarab Hunter Wasp

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Any idea what this is?
Location: Mpumalanga, South Africa
February 12, 2017 2:37 pm
This wasp? was rather aggressive.
Signature: Yes

Mammoth Wasp

This is a Mammoth Wasp in the family Scoliidae, and though there are several images posted to iSpot of this distinctive Scoliid, it is only identified to the family level.  Female Mammoth Wasps prey upon the grubs of Scarab Beetles which provide food for her developing young.

Mammoth Wasp

Mammoth Wasp

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Subject: Black large flying insect. Blue wings
Location: NSW Australia
February 12, 2017 11:14 pm
Hey, NSW Australia here. Just found this guy near the door. He is larger than a wasp and smaller than a hornet also has the iridescent type blue wings. Just wondering what he might be… haven’t seen this one before
Signature: Regards, andrew

Black Flower Wasp

Dear Andrew,
Though we first located this image on FlickR, we are much more comfortable informing you that this is a Black Flower Wasp,
Austroscolia soror, since the same image is posted to iNaturalist.  The species is also pictured on the Atlas of Living Australia and Encyclopedia of Life.  The Black Flower Wasp is a member of the family Scoliidae, and females withing the family prey on the grubs of Scarab Beetles by laying their eggs, so the beetle grubs provide a live food source for the developing wasp larvae. 

Black Flower Wasp

Black Flower Wasp

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Location: Morocco
November 24, 2016 10:09 am
Dear Daniel Marlos:
Just happened upon your site and decided to let you know about my own minor efforts in entomology. I spend a good deal of my time (retired) in Morocco and one thing I do is take photos of all sorts of subjects, including plenty of ‘bug’ pictures – especially bees and butterflies. Many are as yet to be uploaded since I’m trying to learn the basics about taxonomy but, alas, it’s slow going!
… Thanks for any help or suggestions you might offer.
Signature: Jearld Moldenhauer

Scarab Hunter Wasp, we believe

Scarab Hunter Wasp, we believe

Dear Jearld,
WE believe the hairy Hymenopteran is a Scarab Hunter Wasp in the family Scoliidae.  Here is an image that looks similar that is posted to PicClick, but we can’t find any information on the species.  Though the colors are quite different, the body morphology of this
Scolia dubia posted to BugGuide looks similar to that of your individual.  Your other wasp might be a Paper Wasp in the subfamily Polistinae.

Possibly Paper Wasp

Possibly Paper Wasp

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Subject: Ant or Wasp?
Location: Singapore
October 12, 2016 1:28 pm
Hi,
I took this picture in Kitchen Garden, Pasir Ris Park of Singapore on a fine October morning. I can’t figure out whether this is an ant or a wasp. Help appreciated. Thanks!
Signature: Teng

Mammoth Wasp: Scolia species

Mammoth Wasp: Scolia species

Dear Teng,
Your image of a Mammoth Wasp (AKA Flower Wasp or Scarab Hunter) in the family Scoliidae is gorgeous.  It looks very similar to this FlickR image from Indonesia of
Scolia vollenhoveni, and we suspect it is either the same species or a closely related species in the same genus.  Of the North American species, BugGuide notes:  “Larvae are parasitoids of ground-dwelling scarab grubs, esp. Phyllophaga; adults take nectar.”   Of the genus, BugGuide notes:  “7 spp. in our area, a great many more in the Old World (30 in Europe alone).”

Dear Daniel,
Thanks a million!
Regards,
Teng

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination