Currently viewing the category: "Potter and Mason Wasps"
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another scary bug in my cottage in India
Location: Andhra Pradesh, India
December 11, 2011 10:19 am
Hi – thanks for identifying the Assassin Bug for me last month, and now I’ve found another, even more bizarre thing in my house. Any ideas, please?
Signature: Steve Sargent

Potter Wasp, we believe

Dear Steve,
WE are relatively certain, based on the body shape, which is described on BugGuide as:  “First two abdominal segments forming a tapered petiole linking abdomen and thorax.”   Potter Wasps are in the subfamily Eumeninae and your individual might be in the genus
Eumenes.  We found a match for body shape on the Krishna Mohan Photography website, and then we found what really resembles your species on the India Nature Watch website.  Potter Wasps often build nests that resemble small ceramic pots.

Potter Wasp, we believe

Dear Daniel,
Many thanks for identifying my Potter Wasp – and so quickly!  The photos which you pointed me to are amazing, and the information is very interesting indeed.
All the best,
Steve

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Mystery (to me) hornet
Location: Deep southern Illinois
October 31, 2011 3:12 pm
While hiking the other day I found this ”hornet” alone and chilly early one sunny day. Can you let me know what kind of bug this chilly fellow is?
Signature: JimmyDean

Potter Wasp

Dear JimmyDean,
This is a Potter or Mason Wasp in the subfamily Eumeninae, though we are uncertain if Potter Wasp and Mason Wasp are synonymous or if they are two distinct groups within the family.  We believe we identified your Potter Wasp or Mason Wasp as
Pseudodynerus quadrisectus, based on photos posted to BugGuide which states it “Nests in borings made in wood, preys on caterpillars” and that it is found from “June-September (North Carolina)”.  Your individual was sighted significantly late in the season.  Perhaps a change in weather patterns is responsible.

Editor’s Note:  If you have a late Potter Wasp or other insect sighting, please submit it.

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Nest
Location: Mediteranean coast of south westTurkey
October 3, 2011 12:28 am
Please identify this wasp’s? nest. It is on the side of my house on the artificial facing bricks 1.7 meters from the ground. (we do get mud daubers but these construct the 8mm dia x 30 mm long nests)
Thank You
Signature: Malcolm

Mason Wasp Nest, we believe

Hi Malcolm,
We believe this is a Mason Wasp nest from the subfamily Eumeninae, however, we are unable to substantiate that in our web searching.  We are posting your photo and letter and we hope to get some confirmation eventually.

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Some type of paper wasp?
Location: Hawthorne, CA
October 1, 2011 1:58 pm
Here’s another wasp that’s new to my yard. Is it another type of paper wasp?
Signature: Thanks, Anna Carreon

Potter Wasp

Hi again Anna,
Like the photo you submitted this past June, and the images you submitted in December, we believe this is another Mason Wasp or Potter Wasp in the subfamily Eumeninae.  The angle of view for the photos and the variation in markings may be confusing you.

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Help in IDing this wasp, please.
Location: Mason County, Ludington, MI
September 17, 2011 9:33 pm
Took the attached photo today at Ludington State Park in Ludington, MI. Would appreciate help in ID.
Signature: John

Potter Wasp

Hi John,
This is one of the Potter Wasps in the subfamily Eumeninae, and we believe we have correctly identified it as
Eumenes fraternus based on images posted to BugGuide.  Potter Wasps are solitary wasps that build small mud nests provisioned with caterpillars that look like miniature ceramic urns or vases.   

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unicorn wasp
Location: Jamestown, RI
August 24, 2011 5:01 pm
Rescued this little guy from a bowl of water then decided to take a walk up my arm.
Signature: PeeGee

Potter Wasp

Hi again PeeGee,
This looks to us like one of the Potter Wasps or Mason Wasps in the subfamily Eumeninae, and you can find many of the similar looking genera on BugGuide.  We believe the antennae stuck together because of the water, giving your individual the appearance of only one horn.  For your valiant rescue, we are tagging you as a Bug Humanitarian.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination