Currently viewing the category: "Potter and Mason Wasps"
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Subject: aussietrev Boring Little Wasp
Location: Nth Burnett. Queensland Australia
December 17, 2012 9:49 pm
Hi Guys,
Nearly Christmas, all the best to you and yours and all the visitors to WTB.
This little wasp is about 10mm long. The dark dot to the right of its head is a burrow it has dug into an Ironbark tree. The hole is about 1 to 1.5mm diameter.
I think it is probably something in the potter wasp family having markings quite similar to this one.
http://www.brisbaneinsects.com/brisbane_vespoidwasps/BlackPotterWasp2.htm
What do you think?
Have a good holiday season all and lets hope for a better year next year.
Signature: aussietrev

Probably Potter Wasp

Hi Trevor,
Your wasp does look quite similar to the
Paralastor sp. which is pictured on the Brisbane Insect website.  We are content with that identification.  Thanks for the holiday cheer.

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Subject: Potter wasp and Gulf Fritillaries on Passion Flower vine
Location: Tucson, AZ
September 22, 2012 12:56 am
Good evening!
I thought you might enjoy these photos of some of the many visitors to my passion flower vines. In the first photo you’ll see a pretty little potter wasp constructing her nurseries. Any idea what species she is?
The second photo I like to call ”synchronized chrysalis exiting competition”. I’m fairly certain my 4 vines are responsible for about 90% of the population of Gulf Fritillaries in Tucson. I’ve had so many caterpillars my poor vines are barely clinging to life. Do you think the potter could be using the smaller caterpillars to feed her young? It would be great to get some natural crowd control.
I’ve also seen several tiny lacewing larvae on the vines, carrying around bunches of junk (and ant bodies) on their backs for camouflage- I was able to identify them using your site. They’re so cool, but my camera’s not sophisticate enough to get a good shot.
Love your site!
Signature: Emily

Potter Wasp constructs Pot

Hi Emily,
This is a beautiful Potter Wasp and your photo is exquisite.  One of the closest color matches we could find on BugGuide is
Dolichodynerus tanynotus, but alas, there is no species information.  There is a single submission from San Diego.  Further research on bugGuide makes us inclined to speculate that this is actually Eumenes bollii, which appears darker than your individual, however, the markings appear very similar, especially this image from San Diego.  The BugGuide genus page for Eumenes states:  “Females make a pot of clay as a nest, provision with moth and beetle larvae. Wasp places eggs on wall of cell, then provisions” though we would not discount the possibility that your individual is provisioning her nest with Gulf Fritillary Caterpillars, especially since the subfamily page on BugGuide indicates:  “Most provision with caterpillars.”  Thank you for proposing such an interesting hypothesis.  Though there is no actual documentation, we are taking creative license and tagging this as a Food Chain possibility.

Simultaneous emergence of Gulf Fritillaries

Daniel,
Thanks so much for replying to my letter. I think you nailed it with the Eumenes bollii identification, the photos on BugGuide look just like her. I’ve always wondered what sort of organs/tissues run through that tiny wasp waist from the body that keep the abdomen alive…
Thanks again,
Emily

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Subject: bugs
Location: Rheinau, Switzerland.
September 18, 2012 11:47 am
This 4cm wasp-like insect was found on a gravestone making a nest. Could you tell me what it is please?
Signature: JPB

Potter Wasp

Dear JPB,
Because of the shape of the wasp’s body as well as the nest, our best guess is that this is a Potter Wasp or Mason Wasp in the subfamily Eumeninae.  Switzerland does not have many insect identification websites, but you can compare your individual to the North American members of the genus Eumenes represented on BugGuide.

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Thread-waisted Wasp in Portugal
Location: Portugal (37º31’55.23”N 8º26’33.53”W)
November 18, 2011 1:28 pm
Hi,
Please can you help me identify the attached picture of a Thread-waisted Wasp. The picture was taken on 10th September in southern Portugal while it was building its brood chamber which you can see in the picture. The brood chamber was made on a south-facing stone wall 150 mts above sea level and at the end of a few days the wasp sealed the opening.
Thanks and regards,
Frank
Signature: Frank

Potter Wasp constructs nest

Hi Frank,
This is actually a Potter Wasp in the subfamily Eumeninae.  They construct a mud nest that is provisioned with food for the developing larva.  Moth Caterpillars are a common larval food.  This posting is postdated to go live in early January.

Dear Daniel,
Thanks a ton.
Ciao,
Frank
PS You can see what others have said about us by visiting this page on Tripadvisor.
www.paradiseinportugal.com
www.birdinginportugal.com
Paradise in Portugal
Quinta do Barranco da Estrada
7665 – 880 Santa Clara a Velha
Portugal

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another scary bug in my cottage in India
Location: Andhra Pradesh, India
December 11, 2011 10:19 am
Hi – thanks for identifying the Assassin Bug for me last month, and now I’ve found another, even more bizarre thing in my house. Any ideas, please?
Signature: Steve Sargent

Potter Wasp, we believe

Dear Steve,
WE are relatively certain, based on the body shape, which is described on BugGuide as:  “First two abdominal segments forming a tapered petiole linking abdomen and thorax.”   Potter Wasps are in the subfamily Eumeninae and your individual might be in the genus
Eumenes.  We found a match for body shape on the Krishna Mohan Photography website, and then we found what really resembles your species on the India Nature Watch website.  Potter Wasps often build nests that resemble small ceramic pots.

Potter Wasp, we believe

Dear Daniel,
Many thanks for identifying my Potter Wasp – and so quickly!  The photos which you pointed me to are amazing, and the information is very interesting indeed.
All the best,
Steve

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Mystery (to me) hornet
Location: Deep southern Illinois
October 31, 2011 3:12 pm
While hiking the other day I found this ”hornet” alone and chilly early one sunny day. Can you let me know what kind of bug this chilly fellow is?
Signature: JimmyDean

Potter Wasp

Dear JimmyDean,
This is a Potter or Mason Wasp in the subfamily Eumeninae, though we are uncertain if Potter Wasp and Mason Wasp are synonymous or if they are two distinct groups within the family.  We believe we identified your Potter Wasp or Mason Wasp as
Pseudodynerus quadrisectus, based on photos posted to BugGuide which states it “Nests in borings made in wood, preys on caterpillars” and that it is found from “June-September (North Carolina)”.  Your individual was sighted significantly late in the season.  Perhaps a change in weather patterns is responsible.

Editor’s Note:  If you have a late Potter Wasp or other insect sighting, please submit it.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination