Currently viewing the category: "Ichneumons"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Flying beetle????
Geographic location of the bug:  Cochrane, Alberta Canada
Date: 10/24/2019
Time: 03:56 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Saw this walking along our window (inside)
How you want your letter signed:  Tracey

Ichneumon

Dear Tracey,
Those antennae lead us to believe that this is some species of Ichneumon, a family of parasitoid Wasps whose larvae feed on the internal organs of host-specific Arachnids and immature insects including Caterpillars, Beetle grubs and larvae of wood boring Wasps.  This is an enormous family with according to BugGuide:  “~5,000 described spp. in almost 500 genera in the Nearctic Region, possibly 3,000 more undescribed.”  We doubt it is your species because it is not reported as far north or west, but your individual does resemble 
Limonethe maurator which is pictured on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What’s this bug?
Geographic location of the bug:  Alabama
Date: 08/15/2019
Time: 10:30 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  What is this?
How you want your letter signed:  Gillian McCown

Stump Stabber

Dear Gillian,
This is a female Giant Ichneumon in the genus
Megarhyssa, probably Megarhyssa macrurus.  Giant Ichneumons are sometimes called Stump Stabbers because the female uses her long ovipositor to deposit eggs beneath the bark of trees infested with wood boring larvae of Horntails.  They are not aggressive and they do not sting.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Crane Fly?
Geographic location of the bug:  Ontario
Date: 08/09/2019
Time: 05:42 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I saw this beautiful large insect with amazing colours and couldn’t help but take a picture and try to figure out what it was. The bug looks so deadly but my logic tells me it’s some sort of crane fly that wouldn’t harm you but you never know. I’m thinking someone else might find this insect really cool looking.
How you want your letter signed:  Crane fly???

Stump Stabber

This Giant Ichneumon, Megarhyssa macrurus, is commonly called a Stump Stabber because the female uses her very long ovipositor to drill into trees infested with Horntail larvae, and then to lay eggs.  Ichneumon larvae feed on the Horntail larvae.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is this??
Geographic location of the bug:  Southwest iowa
Date: 06/19/2019
Time: 07:37 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  What is this?  Looks like a wasp but for its tail like thing and design on body.  Tail thing comes out of body about 1/4″ from end of body! Coin in the picture is a quarter for visual comparison.
How you want your letter signed:  Concerned Mimi

Giant Ichneumon

Dear Concerned Mimi,
This is a harmless, beneficial Giant Ichneumon in the genus
Megarhyssa, sometimes called a Stump Stabber because the female uses her lengthy ovipositor to lay her eggs in diseased and dying trees where the larvae will be able to feed on the the wood boring larvae of Horntails.  We believe your individual is Megarhyssa macrurus.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Is this a type of Hornet?
Geographic location of the bug:  Bury lancashire
Date: 06/18/2019
Time: 12:55 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found this little hitch hiker on my car today. Im facinated to know if it is a Hornet.
How you want your letter signed:  The bug man

Ichneumon might be Amblyteles armatorius

This is not a Hornet, but it is a Parasitoid Wasp known as an Ichneumon.  There are so many species that look similar, an exact species identification might not be possible, but it does resemble Amblyteles armatorius which is pictured on UK Safari where it states:  “Ichneumon wasps are solitary insects which are closely related to bees and ants. Most ichneumons are parasitoids.  The females lay their eggs into, or onto, the young of other insects and spiders, and the young which hatch out feed on that host insect.  The host is eventually killed and consumed by the larva just before it pupates.”  There are additional images on Nature Spot.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Images of crane-fly-like-insect (probably Ichneumon?) that stung me
Geographic location of the bug:  Grants Pass, Oregon
Date: 06/03/2019
Time: 07:19 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi there. A couple of weeks ago, when traveling through Ashland OR, I was surprised when something I thought was a harmless crane fly stung me! I was so surprised, having always been taught they are harmless, that I took the internet to look this up, and found your site. I added a comment to this thread: https://www.whatsthatbug.com/2017/04/08/stinging-crane-fly
A week later, in Grants Pass, OR, I saw this one sitting still on a wall and was able to get a picture. I can’t guarantee it’s the same thing that stung me, as I didn’t get to see this one flying, and I didn’t get to see the one that stung me sitting still. But it’s about the same size and look as the one that stung me. And this looks a lot more to me like the Ichneumon referenced in some of your posts about crane fly stings. It’s pretty clearly not a crane fly. I haven’t found anything that describes how the Ichneumon flies – but if it’s similar to a crane fly, then I bet this is what stung me.
How you want your letter signed:  Seneca

Ichneumon

Dear Seneca,
As your letter indicates, you cannot be certain this was the insect that stung you, but it is an Ichneumon and it is easy to see why it might be confused with a Crane Fly.  We have also always learned that Crane Flies are harmless and they neither sting nor bite, but we keep getting submissions to the contrary, including a very convincing letter that included both the Crane Fly and the “sting”.

Thank you so much for your reply!
I’m really glad to be learning more about these insects.
Do you know if the Ichneumon flies awkwardly about much like a crane fly?
I never knew there was an insect that could sting that looked and flew so much like a crane fly.
This one had come into our camper van attracted to the light and flitting about and I just assumed it was harmless and cupped it gently in my hands to put it out.
Now I know to be more careful!
I should probably know better than to assume anything anyway. There’s so much I don’t know about so many things.

Hi again Seneca,
Crane Flies have a much more gangly and awkward flight.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination