Currently viewing the category: "Ichneumons"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Please tell me what this is
Geographic location of the bug:  NJ
Date: 09/20/2017
Time: 10:01 PM EDT
Hi,
Can you please tell me what this is, and please tell me it isn’t dangerous?
How you want your letter signed:  J25

Ichneumon, we believe

Dear J25,
We believe this is an Ichneumon, but we would not eliminate the possibility that it might be the other family within Ichneumonoidea, Braconidae.  In a quick and unsuccessful attempt to identify it, we searched BugGuide, but a more thorough search will take much more time than we have right now.  We suspect this Ichneumon is the victim of Unnecessary Carnage.

Thanks! So from what I read about the two possibilities below – not dangerous to humans….
That’s what I really needed to know.
I appreciate your help greatly!
Joseph
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is this?
Geographic location of the bug:  Arkansas
Date: 08/31/2017
Time: 08:41 PM EDT
Hello. This bug is not afraid of anyone getting close to it at all. It was on my shirt last night and then I knocked it off. A few minutes later it stung or bit my wrist and it stung for quite a bit. I’ve never seen a bug like this. We found it again today and I was trying to kill it but it was very tough to kill. Any ideas? Thank you.
How you want your letter signed:  Sam

Short-Tailed Ichneumon

Dear Sam,
This is a Short-Tailed Ichneumon in the subfamily Ophioninae, the only group of Ichneumons capable of stinging humans.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Help!
Geographic location of the bug:  North western KS
Date: 09/01/2017
Time: 12:02 AM EDT
So this big was in my house and one of my kids (being a kid) tried to pick it up and got stung. Her whole finger is bright red and she’s telling me it feels like it was smashed. Any clue what this guy is!?
How you want your letter signed:  Lauren

Short Tailed Ichneumon

Dear Lauren,
Whenever we receive a submission or comment from a person claiming to have been bitten or stung by a Crane Fly, we immediate suspect a Short-Tailed Ichneumon like the one in the image you submitted.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is this cool bug?
Geographic location of the bug:  Hesperia, MI
August 27, 2017 8:47 AM
We found this on our motorhome going through a pre-flight cleaning, but attached is a picture, it’s tail is amazing!
How you want your letter signed:  The schroeder’s

Stump Stabber

Dear Schroeders
This is the largest, and arguably the most impressive, North American parasitoid Ichneumon,
Megarhyssa atrata, commonly called a Stump Stabber because the female uses her lengthy ovipositor to lay eggs beneath the bark of trees that are infested with wood boring Horntail larvae.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Found this critter in the kitchen today.
Geographic location of the bug:  Sheffield, UK
August 26, 2017 12:33 AM
Can you identify this bug.  Sheffield UK
How you want your letter signed:  No

Ichneumon

Dear No,
This is a parasitoid Ichneumon Wasp and there are several pictured on Nature Spot that look similar including
Buathra laborator which is described on Nature Spot as being “Quite a large blackish insect with mainly orange legs. There are other similar species and expert help is needed with identification. ”  Also similar looking is Pimpla rufipes which is described on Nature Spot as being:  “Length about 15 mm. A mainly black species, but with bright orange legs, the hind pair of legs being only slightly larger than the other pairs. The ovipositor of the female is quite thick and short and the ‘waist’ between the thorax and abdomen is also quite short” and “Mainly an autumn species.”

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this bug?
Location: Colchester,Connecticut
August 3, 2017 7:13 pm
Check out the long tail on this. The entire critter is sbout 7 inches long. I spotted it in early August in Colchester, Connecticut on a maple tree.
Signature: David

Stump Stabber

Dear David,
What you are calling a tail is actually the ovipositor that this parasitoid female Giant Ichneumon,
Megarhyssa macrurus, commonly called a Stump Stabber, uses to lay her eggs beneath the bark of trees that are infested by the host insect, the wood boring larvae of Wood Wasps like the Pigeon Horntail.

Daniel:
Thanks for the identification of the Megarhyssa macrurus. That’s some bug!
Since I began building a naturalized permaculture forest of fruit trees and companion plants I have been taking more time to observe insects. What an amazing world.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination