Currently viewing the category: "Carrot Wasps"
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Subject: Butterwasp??!!
Location: Southern NJ
August 10, 2017 7:53 pm
Strange black wasp with butterflylike wings found in New Jersey . Looks like it has a long ovipositor.
Couldn’t find any similar photos –Help!
Signature: Thanks-Donna

Aulacid Wasp: Pristaulacus fasciatus

Dear Donna,
This is such a gorgeous wasp, that despite the difficulty, we were not going to give up until we got you an answer.  At first we thought this must be a parasitoid Ichneumon or Braconid, but we eventually learned it was neither.  We identified your parasitoid wasp as
Pristaulacus fasciatus thanks to this BugGuide image.  Of the family Aulacidae, Bugguide notes:  “Frequently mistaken for ichneumon wasps as they often frequent dead standing trees, logs, woodpiles. Note “neck” between head and thorax and the high attachment point of the metasoma” and “endoparasitoids of the wood-boring larvae of beetles (of several families, but mostly longhorns) and Xiphydria wood wasps.”  This is a new species representing a new family on our site, so we are creating a new sub-sub-category of Aulacid Wasps just to house your submission.

Dear Daniel.
Thanks so much for your quick reply-you guys are great!!!
Very exciting that you created a new sub-sub-category for our find!!!
~Donna
Daniel I forgot to ask does it has a common name?

Hi again Donna.  We have not been able to find a common name, though PBase does call it an Aulacid Wasp, but that is just a reference to the family.

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Subject: What insect is this?
Location: Centennial Park, Sydney, Australia
April 20, 2014 6:04 am
Hi there,
I came across this insect by some flowers in Centennial Park, Sydney, Australia. I can’t say I’ve seen anything like it, so I thought I’d see if you know. Thanks.
Signature: Chris

Possibly Carrot Wasp

Possibly Carrot Wasp

Dear Chris,
Of this we are certain:  This is a parasitic wasp that is classified as Parasitica or Parasitic Apocrita, which is not a true taxonomic category, but it is a means to group parasitic wasps together.  We believe it is a Carrot Wasp in the family Gasteruptiidae, which we identified on BugGuide, and then verified on the Atlas of Living Australia as being a family that is found in Australia.  We may be wrong, but the look of the hind legs and the antennae as well as the ovipositor are good indications that we are correct.  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae are predators or predators-inquilines (consume larval food, not the larvae) of other Hymenoptera that nest in twigs and in wood.”  The Atlas of Living Australia notes:  “Females oviposit in the nests of solitary bees (Apidae) and wasps (Vespidae) , where the larvae are predator-inquilines, eating the host egg or larvae and consuming the pollen store. Adult gasteruptiids may be seen on flowers or hovering near bare ground, logs or trees.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Is this an Ichneumon?
Location: Dorset, England
June 30, 2013 12:16 pm
Hi,
I would be grateful to kniow if this is an Ichneumon? We pictured it in our garden yesterday afternoon in Dorset, England. The body was about 1 cm long, very delicate, plus the length of the probe. It was a very light insect which went off on the wind shortly after the picture was taken.
Kind regards,
Bob Bentley
Signature: Bob Bentley

Carrot Wasp

Carrot Wasp

Dear Bob,
This is a Parasitic Hymenopteran, but it is not an Ichneumon.  We quickly found this image of a Carrot Wasp in the genus
Gasteruption on BugGuide, and we figured we had nailed your identification request, but then we realized you were from England.  BugGuide indicates:  “Adults take nectar; larvae are predators or predator-inquilines of other Hymenoptera that nest in twigs or other woody sites” and “Gasteruption have a characteristic hovering flight with the swollen metatibiae hanging down so that the insect resembles a helicopter carrying a large load on a cable.”  Nature Spot reports the species Gasteruption jaculator in England and notes:  ” The female will visit the nests of various solitary bees or wasps, and will push her ovipositor into the nest, depositing her own eggs on or near to the eggs of the host, on hatching they will feed on the grubs of the host as well as on stored food.”  We are not certain if the common family name of Carrot Wasp is used in England.

Thank you so much Daniel.  Always nice to know we have a parasitic hymenopteran on the premises, it’s definitely one up on the neighbours!!!
Thanks again,
Bob

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So sorry to send so many
Location: Hawthorne, CA
August 29, 2011 6:14 pm
Hi,
Here is one that is on a flower that I haven’t been able to identify. I do know that it’s tiny flowers go to seed much as a dandelion. Guess I should pull it up right away if I don’t want my whole garden to be taken over. Just wanted to wait until I could get a somewhat decent photo of this tiny guy. Can you help? I’m sending a photo of a bloom with a Mexican Sunflower leaf behind it so you can get an idea of the size. We know you’re very busy right now, but would appreciate any help you can give.
Anna
Signature: Thanks, Anna Carreon

Carrot Wasp

Hi Again Anna,
We actually identified this one much more quickly than we anticipated.  We opened the digital photo up yesterday before we did any research and this morning we zeroed in on the Carrot Wasps in the genus
Gasteruption on BugGuide.  There is not too much information on the information page on BugGuide, except the unexplained common name Carrot Wasp and this statement regarding food:  “Adults take nectar; larvae are predators or predator-inquilines of other Hymenoptera that nest in twigs or other woody sites.”  We suspect the adults are fond of taking nectar from the umbel blossoms of carrots and related plants, including many herbs like parsley, dill, and anise.  Your specimen is a male, as he lacks the ovipositor of the female.  This Cirrus Images website has some beautiful photographs and from there we were directed to the Tree of Life website that more thoroughly covers the parasitic habits of the group.

Daniel,
Thanks very much!  This is such a small wasp and is very hard see, much less get in focus.  I’m so glad you were able to identify it for me.  I also appreciate the links to Cirrus Images & Tree of Life websites.
Anna

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination