Currently viewing the category: "Parasitic Hymenopterans"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What’s Hatching on my Super Lemon Haze?
Geographic location of the bug:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
Date: 08/13/2018
Time: 09:32 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Dear Bugman,
I’m sorry to trouble you again so soon, but because I am very nervous regarding Budworms, I am trying to inspect my plants carefully every day.  Today I noticed these creatures hatching from eggs laid on my Super Lemon Haze hybrid.  They were moving around the eggs quickly and appeared to be crawling on top of one another.  What’s going on here?  Do I have a need to worry?
The first photo was shot without a flash and the other two were shot with a flash.
How you want your letter signed: Constant Gardener

Telenominid Wasps hatching from Stink Bug Eggs

Dear Constant Gardener,
These appear to be Stink Bug Eggs, possibly from the Red Shouldered Stink Bug you submitted yesterday, but those are not Stink Bugs that are hatching.  We immediately suspected some Parasitoid Wasp, so we researched Parasitoids that attack Stink Bug eggs, and we found this image on BugGuide of a parasitoid in the genus
Telenomus that looks similar to your individuals and this image on BugGuide of another member of the genus.  We also located this image on BugGuide of a different parasitoid in the genus Trissolcus and this image on BugGuide of a member in that same genus, both of which have also parasitized Stink Bug eggs.  Of the latter genus, BugGuide indicates:  “parasitize eggs of Pentatomorpha.”  Your images lack critical sharpness due to soft focus, and the images taken with flash also have some “ghosting” from a slow shutter speed.  Additionally, we lack the necessary expertise to provide an accurate species or genus identification, but both genera are in the subfamily Telenominae in the family Platygastridae, and this represents a new subcategory for our site.  Furthermore, your images are excellent examples of how pests can be controlled with organic methods.

Telenominid Wasps hatching from Stink Bug Eggs

Telenominid Wasps hatching from Stink Bug Eggs

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Stickbug?
Geographic location of the bug:  Silver Spring, MD
Date: 08/12/2018
Time: 12:14 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Found this in the back yard.  Looks like there maybe eggs on its back.  Is it going to mess up my garden?
How you want your letter signed:  Gene

Parasitized Inchworm with Chalcid Pupae

Dear Gene,
Your “stickbug” is an Inchworm or Spanworm, the caterpillar of a moth in the family Geometridae, and they are excellent twig mimics.  What you have mistaken for eggs are actually the pupae of parasitoid Chalcid Wasps.  Here is a similarly parasitized Inchworm on BugGuide and here is an image of the Chalcid Wasp that emerged, also on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What type of Ichneumon wasp is this?
Geographic location of the bug:  Indoors, Salem MA
Date: 08/04/2018
Time: 02:37 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Found this guy flying around my office at approx 8pm in early August.  Length is approx 1/2 inch.  Head is not black, though thorax mostly is.  Can’t find out exactly what kind of Ichneumon he is.  Nothing online seems to clearly match
How you want your letter signed:  Perez

Ichneumon

Dear Perez,
Your images would be excellent for identifying this Ichneumon if the identification of Ichneumons was an easy matter.  According to BugGuide:  “5,000 described spp. in almost 500 genera in the Nearctic Region, possibly 3,000 more undescribed; arguably, the largest animal family, with the estimated 60,000 species worldwide (up to 100,000, according to some estimates).”  The most similar looking image we could find on BugGuide regarding the shape of legs, head and antennae is in the genus
Banchus, however, the coloration is noticeably different.  Alas, we will have to post your images and tag them as unidentified.

Ichneumon

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Large gold flying mosquito
Geographic location of the bug:  Crossville, TN
Date: 08/01/2018
Time: 01:01 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I got bit by this gold flying insect and it felt like a sting? Just trying to identify
How you want your letter signed:  HH

Short Tailed Ichneumon

Dear HH,
This is a parasitoid Short-Tailed Ichneumon, probably in the genus
Ophion.  We were surprised to learn many years ago that this group is rather unique among Ichneumons in that they are capable of stinging humans.  According to BugGuide:  “Most all Ophion larva are parasites of caterpillars.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  This bug / insect scares me
Geographic location of the bug:  Goodlettsville TN
Date: 07/11/2018
Time: 07:05 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This see picture has shown up on my front porch. It flies quickly if you try to get near it. Is it harmful or dangerous? It scares me.
How you want your letter signed:  Karen

Stump Stabber

Dear Karen,
The Giant Ichneumon or Stump Stabber is neither harmful nor dangerous, but the lengthy ovipositor is frightening looking.  This is a beneficial insect.  The female uses her ovipositor to lay eggs beneath the bark of trees infested with wood boring larvae, and the Ichneumon larva feeds on those wood boring larvae.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Unknown hymenopteran
Geographic location of the bug:  south eastern PA
Date: 07/10/2018
Time: 04:35 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello. I am the plant protection intern at Morris Arboretum of the University of Pennsylvania and our arborist saw this insect fly out of a diseased Juniper. Can you please help me to ID it? I am sorry that he removed the insect’s head. I took this video because it is still moving.
Thank you.
How you want your letter signed:  Jenny

Braconid, we believe

Hi Jenny,
Because of the coloration, what appears to be a long ovipositor at the tip of the abdomen, and the written description that it emerged from a diseased juniper, we believe this is a Braconid, a parasitoid Hymenopteran in the family Braconidae, which is well represented on BugGuide.  We have an old posting of Braconids swarming on a grape trunk in California, and at that time, Eric Eaton noted “so few braconids are parasitic on wood borers.”  We also have this UK sighting in our archives that we believe to be in the genus
Atanycolus.  That genus is represented on BugGuide where it states:  “Parasites of woodboring beetle larvae, especially metallic wood-boring beetles (Buprestidae) and longhorn beetles (Cerambycidae).”  Since your juniper is diseased, it is probably infested with wood boring beetle larvae, the natural prey for parasitoid Braconids in the genus Atanycolus, so your arborist seems to have decapitated a beneficial predator and part of the solution, and not the cause of the problem for the tree, which is why we will be tagging the posting as Unnecessary Carnage.  If the tree does have a bad infestation of borer grubs, you might see additional Braconids emerge.  The female Braconid uses her ovipositor to deposit eggs beneath the bark of an infested tree or other woody plant, and the hatched larvae feed on the larvae of the beetles.  Adults emerge after pupation, so it is an understandable mistake to believe the Braconid is a harmful insect when it emerges from the tree.  We hope the information we provided will score you a few extra intern points.  

Great. Thank you so much for the very detailed response. It was sad to see that a good insect was decapitated, although it was an honest mistake. I was not there when it happened 🙁 I realized that my post still said video, even though I sent a picture. I was unable to upload the video file to the site because it was too large, but I have attached it here. It is very unsettling, especially when the poor wasp’s wings move.
Jenny

Braconid Wasp

Thanks Jenny,
We were able to get a better still from the video to illustrate the posting.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination