Currently viewing the category: "Parasitic Hymenopterans"
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Subject: This bug hurt me. What is it?
Location: Central Kansas (Valley Center, Kansas)
April 16, 2017 8:52 pm
I let my dogs in around 9:45 pm and in came two of these bugs. One stung me, I actually screamed because it hurt. An hour later it still hurts. I need to know what this bug is or my 10 yr old will never go outside again. I live near a pond and I am in Valley Center, Kansas this is located in the central part of the state. 4-16-2017
Signature: C.Waller

Short-Tailed Ichneumon

Dear C. Waller,
This is a Short-Tailed Ichneumon in the subfamily Ophioninae, a parasitoid wasp that we believe is to blame for many reports we receive of stinging Crane Flies.  Short-Tailed Ichneumons are attracted to lights, and that might be the reason they entered your home at 9:45 PM.  Though painful, the sting is not considered dangerous.  You might have to rethink restricting the activities of your ten-year old since BugGuide data has the range of Ophioninae as most of North America, with only four states providing no reports:  Montana, Wyoming and the Dakotas.  That does not mean they do not exist there, merely that there have been no BugGuide sightings.

Sting of a Short-Tailed Ichneumon

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Subject: Insect information
Location: Baja California
March 30, 2017 9:44 pm
Found this in sanfelipe Baja mexico, after I woke up with a bite on my are that swelled quickly. Wondering if it could be the cause.
Signature: Josh gordon

Ichneumon

Dear Josh,
If this is the culprit, you were stung and not bitten.  This looks like a Short-Tailed Ichneumon, possibly in the genus
Ophion.  Most Ichneumons are harmless, but members of the genus Ophion are capable of stinging.  According to BugGuide:  “Adult Ophion species will hunt for their host caterpillar. Usually one egg is laid per host. Caterpillar usually dies during pupal stage though wasp larva remains to pupate itself.”

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Subject: Wasp mimic?
Location: Columbus, OH
March 27, 2017 7:41 am
Hello! This insect landed on me and I cannot for the life of me figure out what it is (my best guess is some sort of sawfly). This picture was taken on March 25th in central Ohio in an urban enviornment–I was actually about to get in my car when it was spotted. The weather was sunny and in the 70’s. I am especially perplexed by the super long antenna and the fact that the colored bands on the abdomen do not wrap all the way around. Thanks!
Signature: Intrigued

Ichneumon we believe

Dear Intrigued,
We are posting prior to doing any research as we are rushed right now, but we believe this is an Ichneumon, a member of a very large family of Parasitic Wasps, that are often recognized by long antennae.  Here is a similar looking Ichneumon in the genus
Banchus from BugGuide.

Ichneumon


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Subject: What is this bug?
Location: Hatfield Forest UK
February 19, 2017 9:56 am
Good evening
We saw these bugs under tree bark of felled tree in Hatfield forest.
Do you know what it is please?
Thank you
Signature: Claire

Ichneumons

Dear Claire,
Though your image lacks critical detail, we are relatively confident these are parasitoid Ichneumon Wasps.  Some species feed on wood boring insects, which may explain their presence under the bark of a felled tree.  This images from Nature Spot of
Achaius oratorius look similar.  Ichneumon stramentor, also on Nature Spot, looks like an even better match.  According to Nature Spot:  ” The larva parasitise the Large Yellow Underwing and Setaceous Hebrew Character moth caterpillars (possibly others), the adult wasp lays its eggs inside the caterpillar, the developing larva then eats it from the inside.”  You can also find some interesting information on Paul’s Back Garden Safari.

Ichneumon

 

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Subject: Flying insect
Location: Franklin, Wv
February 15, 2017 10:26 am
We live in a frame house with redwood siding. It is located in Franklin WV, in the mountains. The inset in the attached photo has shown up during the last two spring seasons. We typically see them between the screen and window in several rooms. It would seem that they must be coming out of the walls somehow, Once there was a swarm of perhaps 100 on the outside of the house under a kitchen window and just above the deck. While is is winter here with many sub-freezing days some of these insect appeared afrer a warm spell when it was 60-65F for a few days.
Signature: Pete Tuckerman

Ichneumons

Dear Pete,
These are members of the order Hymenoptera, the insect group that contains Ants, Bees and Wasps, and our initial impression is that they are most likely Parasitoid Wasps that prey on other insects, possibly an Ichneumon or Brachonid, but we would not rule out that they might be grouped with the Symphyta that includes Sawflies, Horntails and Wood Wasps.  We will continue to research this, and we will contact Eric Eaton for his valuable input.

Eric Eaton provides Family identification.
Daniel:
Those are definitely ichneumon wasps.  May have nothing to do with any host living in the redwood siding.  Many species of ichneumons overwinter as adults, often in large numbers, so this is not an unusual phenomenon.  I suspect the wasps are hibernating in the walls, or nooks and crannies in the siding.  They don’t sting, so no worries there, either.
Eric
author, Kaufman Field Guide to Insects of North America
http://bugeric.blogspot.com/

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Subject: What kind of bug?
Location: Humble, Texas USA
February 5, 2017 12:48 pm
Dear Bugman,
We just found this bug in our yard on a leaf. He only has one wing here, so we’re not sure if he’s a flying bug. We can’t seem to find any others like him online. Can you please help us identify it? Thank you!
2/5/17
Signature: The Townsend family

Parasitic Wasp

Dear Townsend Family,
This is some species of Parasitic Wasp, but we do not believe it is in the highly diverse family Ichneumonidae.  While in shape it does resemble this image on BugGuide, your individual has a red thorax and no members of the genus pictured have a similar coloration.

Parasitic Wasp

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination