Currently viewing the category: "Wasps and Hornets"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: what kind of bug is this?
Location: Newark, DE in the United States
August 5, 2014 11:46 am
My kids have been telling me about this crazy looking bug that has been eating bees in our back yard. But I have never seen one personally until today my son pointed one out with a bee captured in its mouth while both are captured in a spider Web! If you could identify this so I can explain to them I would greatly appreciate it alot. Plus for my knowledge also. Thank you greatly and Good bless.
Signature: Pyle Boys

Spider eats Hanging Thief eats Yellowjacket

Spider eats Hanging Thief eats Yellowjacket

Dear Pyle Boys,
We need to begin by telling you we love your documentation of a multi-link Food Chain.  We only wish your image was sharp enough and detailed enough for us to be able to identify the Spider.  The flying predator is a type of Robber Fly known as a Hanging Thief in the genus
Diogmites.  The Hanging Thief gets its common name because it often hangs from one leg while eating the large winged prey, often bees or wasps, that it captures on the wing.  The prey in question is not a bee, but a Yellowjacket.

Multi-Link Food Chair:  Spider eats Fly eats Wasp

Multi-Link Food Chair: Spider eats Fly eats Wasp

I am gonna attach a few more pics of the spider close up and hopefully this can help. And thank you for clearing up the curiosity for me and my sons! And glad you like the food chain effect my son thought it was cool how life works. Thanks again!

Possibly Common House Spider

Possibly Common House Spider

Thanks for sending the additional images, but unfortunately, the images are not critically sharp and it also appears that the color is decidedly cyan/blue, which makes the subtle coloration on the spider difficult to distinguish.  The Hanging Thief and Yellowjacket were quite obvious, but not so with the spider, which may be a Common House Spider, Parasteatoda tepidariorum.  You can see the resemblance to this individual on Bugguide.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s this bug
Location: California
August 3, 2014 12:18 pm
Located this one in Vacaville ca
Signature: Ma

Tarantula Hawk

Tarantula Hawk

Dear Ma,
You have encountered a Tarantula Hawk, a member of several possible genera of Spider Wasps that prey upon Tarantulas, not to eat, but to provide food for the larval wasps.  Tarantula Hawks are not aggressive, but they are reported to have a very painful sting.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknown insect
Location: Nr Manchester, UK
August 3, 2014 12:46 pm
Hi there,
We live in the north west of England, near to Manchester and found this insect in our garden. It’s like nothing we’ve ever seen before. It measured about 3″ long. Can you identify it?
Signature: Best wishes, Fi

Giant Wood Wasp

Giant Wood Wasp

Dear Fi,
This is a Giant Wood Wasp,
Uroceras gigas, and according to the Pottery Museum website:  “Flight period: May – August.  The large size and black and yellow colouration mean that this ‘wasp’ causes more than a few scares, but it is not a wasp at all, it is a sawfly and completely harmless. The large ‘sting’ is in fact the ovipositor, which is used to lay eggs (and gives it the alternative name of horntail). Most often seen in coniferous woodland.  Common in Staffordshire. “

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this huge flying bug?
Location: Southern Maine
August 3, 2014 7:45 am
They have infested our backyard, burrowing in the dirt around our pool. What are they and how can we kill them/get rid of them?
Signature: CH

Great Black Wasp

Great Black Wasp

Dear CH,
This looks like a Great Black Wasp, a non-aggressive, beneficial species that preys upon Katydids and digs underground burrows to use as a nursery.  Other than providing a food source of paralyzed Katydids, the female Great Black Wasp does not defend her nest.  We do not provide extermination advice.  The Great Black Wasp is a much more attractive creature living than dead.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: black wasp with white bands
Location: Fairfax, VA
July 27, 2014 12:27 pm
I photographed this attractive wasp (at the same time as a Great Golden Digger Wasp) on 7/27/14 in Fairfax, Virginia. I haven’t been able to find a reference to ID it. Can you help?
Signature: Seth

Four Toothed Mason Wasp

Four Toothed Mason Wasp

Dear Seth,
Your images of the Four Toothed Mason Wasp,
Monobia quadridens, are positively gorgeous.  According to BugGuide:  “Usually nests in wood borings, but sometimes burrows in dirt banks. Sometimes takes over abandoned nests of carpenter bees or ground bees, also Sceliphron (mud dauber) cells. Nest is provisioned with caterpillars, and cells of nest are separated by mud partitions.”

Four Toothed Mason Wasp

Four Toothed Mason Wasp

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: red footed
Location: alabama
July 26, 2014 2:49 pm
Does this thing bite or sting humans?
Signature: freaked out

Redfooted Cannibalfly eats Paper Wasp

Red-Footed Cannibalfly eats Paper Wasp

Dear freaked out,
Though the Red-Footed Cannibalfly,
Promachus rufipes, is a very adept hunter capable of taking stinging wasps like this Paper Wasp on the wing, they are not aggressive towards humans.  With that said, if a human ever tried to capture a Red-Footed Cannibalfly or other large Robber Fly with bare hands, a bite may result.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination