Currently viewing the category: "Wasps and Hornets"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Hoverfly,
Location: Columbus Ohio
September 12, 2016 5:33 pm
Found this on a brick wall outside our middle school in Columbus Ohio. It was big, like a horsefly. The picture looks smaller.
Signature: Thanks, S Zuza

Bald Faced Hornet

Bald Faced Hornet

Dear S Zuza,
Though many Hover Flies mimic stinging bees and wasps, this Bald Faced Hornet is the real deal.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: WHAT ARE THESE THINGS!?
Location: Tampa, Florida
September 10, 2016 8:05 pm
Ok, so I am a little freaked out because I keep seeing these bugs suddenly and I have never seen them before. I have lived in Florida all of my life and suddenly in the last month or so, this bug keeps showing up. It doesn’t look so scary in the photo, but I will tell you that these bugs do not kill easily. And what I mean by that, is that I have to use a hammer smashing this bug into the tile floor to kill it. No amount of crushing it will kill it unless I use something like a hammer. That is freaking nuts! So yeah, they look kind of like a mosquito, but this thing is hard as a rock. The photo I am submitting makes this thing look like nothing has really happened to it and this was after using a hammer on it. Please help! I would really like to know what these things are and if I can take any measures to get them out of my house and out of my life!
Signature: Thank you!!!!

Ensign Wasp Carnage

Ensign Wasp Carnage

This is an Ensign Wasp, and we are going to unashamedly tag this posting as Unnecessary Carnage.  Ensign Wasps parasitize the oothecae or egg cases of Cockroaches, so we have to include them in the beneficial insects camp.  Large populations of Ensign Wasps in your home means that you must have Cockroaches to support the population.  If you prefer Cockroaches in your house to Ensign Wasps, then by all means, hammer away.

Thank you so much for getting back to me!
So I don’t need to worry about these bugs bitting me or anything?

Though we have always maintained that Ensign Wasps do not sting humans, we believe there is a comment somewhere on our site claiming that a sting occurred.  Suffice to say that they are NOT an aggressive species, though handling one might result in a sting.  They do NOT bite.  According to Owlcation:  “The Ensign Wasp (Evonia appendigaster) looks a bit like a black spider with wings. Many people, upon seeing one, might assume that it will sting, but in fact it is totally harmless.  The Ensign Wasp is actually a beneficial insect because it is a parasite of cockroaches and hunts for their egg-cases, which are known as oothecae. The female wasps lay their eggs in them and the wasp larvae eat the cockroach eggs.”  The Galveston County Master Gardeners website has a nice page devoted to beneficial species and stinging is NOT mentioned.

I can’t tell you how much this means to me to get this info.. It is my goal to live in harmony with the earth and its population, even those bugs that freak me out. I really wanted to call an exterminator, but I am thinking it is best to just leave things be. Is there a way for me to donate to you via paypal? Thank you again!
Andrea

That is very kind of you Andrea.  There is a Paypal link on our site.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Strange Egg Sac
Location: Effingham, IL
September 10, 2016 7:19 pm
Hi,
I found this strange (what I believe is an) egg sac on a fallen leaf in Effingham, IL. I know you identify insects. Are you able to identify their eggs as well? Assuming this is an insect egg… Thanks!
Signature: Best, Jennifer

Spiny Oak Leaf Gall

Hedgehog Gall

Dear Jennifer,
This is a Gall, a growth appearing on a plant that might be caused by an insect, other arthropod or even an injury.  We found a very similar image on the Blue Jay Barrens blog, but the only information is:  “The oak leaves are developing some wonderful galls. I’m not sure how large these pea sized growths will eventually become.”  We found an image on Field Biology in Southeastern Ohio with the information:  “Spiny Hedgehog Galls. The yellow gum drop covered in red hairs makes this wasp
Acraspis erinacei. ”  Another similar image is on the Springfield Plateau blog and the name Hedgehog Gall is used.  Hedgehog Gall is also the name used on BugGuide and according to BugGuide:  “Forms galls on white oak (Quercus alba). The sexual generation forms galls on the buds, and the agamic generation forms the distinctive ‘hedgehog’ galls (ellipsoid, up to 13 mm in diameter, covered with red hairs, with 3-5 larval cells inside) on leaves. Females emerge from the leaf galls in the fall (October-December) and crawl to the buds to oviposit. The resulting gall is a thin-walled blister on the inner face of a bud scale, appearing as the buds start to open in the spring.”

Hi Daniel,
Thank you so much for sharing!  How incredibly interesting.  Nature is amazing.
Best,
Jennifer

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Orange body/Blue wing Wasp – dragging/burying spider
Location: Ocala, FL
September 8, 2016 5:45 pm
Saw this the other day and at first thought the spider had the bug, until the bug ran off in circles for a second and then went back and started dragging the spider to a small hole in the sand. He then started to bury the spider. I actually have video, so these are stills. Just wondering what it is and whether or not it is a danger to any pets (assuming you don’t have pet spiders).
Signature: Ginger

Spider Wasp with Wolf Spider

Spider Wasp with Wolf Spider

Hi Ginger,
We believe your Spider Wasp is
Tachypompilus ferrugineus based on images and range information on BugGuide.  Of the genus, BugGuide notes:  “Adults are often found taking nectar from flowers (Daucus, Pastinaca, and Eryngium). Females provision nests mainly with Lycosids.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Mosquito
Location: Dayton Ohio
September 5, 2016 5:41 pm
Hello
On my way back from my daily run at the local hiking trail and this scary looking thing stuck to my windshield and didn’t move for quarter of a mile. I had to take a picture of it while driving but I was careful. But look at the stinger! I’ve never seen a mosquito quite like that.
This is sept. 6th in southwestern ohio
Signature: Nathan B.

Stump Stabber

Stump Stabber

Dear Nathan,
This is NOT a Mosquito.  It is a parasitic Giant Ichneumon wasp in the genus
Megarhyssa, and it is commonly called a Stump Stabber because the female uses her lengthy ovipositor to lay eggs beneath the bark of trees that are infested with wood boring larvae of Horntails, including the Pigeon Horntail.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Mystery wasp
Location: Troy, VA
September 5, 2016 1:01 pm
I spotted this lovely wasp (I’m assuming it’s a wasp, but maybe it’s not) on goldenrod flowers by the side of a pond. It has a slight bluish sheen that doesn’t really show in the photos. I have done some searching but can’t really figure out what this is. Any help would be appreciated.
thanks again
Signature: Grace Pedalino

Potter Wasp

Potter Wasp

Dear Grace,
We identified your Potter Wasp as
Zethus spinipes thanks to this BugGuide image.  According to BugGuide:  “Black, thorax has yellow marks. Narrow yellow band on abdominal segment 3. Wings brown to violet. Bizarre stalked abdomen typical of genus.”  We are very excited to have a posting to add to our new tag:  Goldenrod Meadow.

Potter Wasp

Potter Wasp

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination