Currently viewing the category: "Wasps and Hornets"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Wasp or hornet
Location: Cold lake,Alberta Canada
July 7, 2017 9:36 pm
Found this massive guy in our pool! Not sure if it’s wasp or hornet.
Signature: Emma

Elm Sawfly

Dear Emma,
This is neither a Wasp nor a Hornet.  This is an Elm Sawfly, and though it does not sting, it is nonetheless classified with Wasps and Bees in the insect order Hymenoptera.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Random bug sighting in backyard.
Location: Anchorage, alaska USA
July 1, 2017 2:03 am
Dear big man. This bug was about as big as my thumb. (An inch or so long) he flew onto an old plywood fish smoker. He (I’m going to assume gender) went on to make a weird noise, almost as though he was nibbled the wood.
Signature: Dog lady, not bug lady.

Bald Faced Hornet

Dear Dog Lady,
This is a Bald Faced Hornet, and we first wanted to establish that they are reported from Alaska.  BugGuide has no reports from Alaska, but they are reported from across Canada, so we can deduce they are probably found in Alaska, but we confirmed that since they are listed on Insect Identification:  Bees, Ants, Wasps and Similar Insects of Alaska.  Your gender assumption is wrong.  Only female Bald Faced Hornets construct nests and care for young.  You are correct that she was nibbling wood.  Bald Faced Hornets chew wood into pulp that they use to construct a paper nest.  Bald Faced Hornets are social wasps that construct a nest that they will defend.  They are not normally aggressive toward humans, but anyone attempting to disturb a nest can probably count on getting stung.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Giant flying monster
Location: Alberta, canada
June 29, 2017 8:41 pm
I rescued this from my kids pool, left it in the sunshine to dry out. My bug go to people have no idea. We live in northern alberta, Canada by the Athabasca river.
Signature: Susie Jack

Elm Sawfly

Dear Susie Jack,
This impressive creature is an Elm Sawfly, a non-stinging relative of Bees and Wasps.  Larvae of the Elm Sawfly look like caterpillars and they feed on leaves, and according to BugGuide:  “hosts include elm (
Ulmus), maple (Acer), birch (Betula), willow (Salix), and basswood (Tilia).”  Because of your rescue efforts, we are tagging your submission with the Bug Humanitarian Award.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug
Location: Battle Ground WA
June 28, 2017 8:19 pm
Can you please tell me what is this bug? Found in my backyard.
Signature: How ever you it

Parasitic Wasp

This is some species of parasitic wasp, and based on BugGuide images, we believe it is in the genus Megischus, a group that includes the Crown of Thorns Wasp, but according to BugGuide the range is:  “Eastern United States. (Taber reports this species occurs from ‘coast-to-coast’.) ”  Your individual has white marks on the legs and the images of the Crown of Thorns Wasp lack that feature.

Parasitic Wasp

Mr Marlos
Thank you for the information. I have never seen a bug like it. It’s tail was really long, black and white.
Jeanene Reeser
Dear Jeanene,
What you have called a “tail” is the female’s ovipositor that she uses to lay eggs.
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Large Bee – Ifrane, Morocco
Location: Ifrane, Morocco
June 26, 2017 4:07 pm
Hello
My 6yr old daughter spotted this magnificent beast this afternoon, just next to a bin on some grass. We were strolling through the town of Ifrane in the middle Atlas Mountains of Morocco (26th June).
Notable by its size – approximately 50mm end to end. Quite furry on its body except for a solid, shiny yellow head and 2 smooth, yellow oval patches on its back. Fine hairy legs too!
We’d love to know what it is!
Thank you
Signature: Naomi, Farida and Soukaina

Female Mammoth Wasp

Dear Naomi, Farida and Soukaina,
This is a female Mammoth Wasp, and we just finished posting another example of a female Mammoth Wasp from Venice, Italy.  The yellow headed female Mammoth Wasp is capable of stinging (black headed male Mammoth Wasps cannot sting) but she is not aggressive toward humans.  Her main goal is to locate the large grubs of Scarab Beetles.  When she finds one, she lays an egg that will feed upon the living Scarab Grub when it hatches, eventually killing the grub.

Female Mammoth Wasp

Hello Daniel
Absolutely delighted to hear your answer. Thank you so much for taking the time to help.
Best wishes,
Naomi

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Artists Abraod
Location: Venice, Italy
June 26, 2017 2:23 pm
Dear Bugman,
I have just returned from a trip to Europe to with Sharon Lockhart and a group of Cal Arts students (myself included) where we did little more than look at art. However, at the Venice Biennale, we snuck out the back door of the Polish pavilion and stumbled across a beautiful bug. All being artists, we were immediately drawn to its crazy coloring as well as its large size and couldn’t help but wonder what was it?! Please help us all by answering this burning question.
Also, as an aside Sharon sends her love.
Warm wishes,
Signature: Elizabeth

Female Mammoth Wasp

Dear Elizabeth,
Welcome home.  This gorgeous, not quite real looking, yellow-headed creature is a female Mammoth Wasp, who can be distinguished from the male Mammoth Wasp who has a black head.  The female Mammoth Wasp hunts for the large grubs of Scarab Beetles, laying an egg on each she finds.  The larval Mammoth Wasp feeds upon and eats the Scarab Grub alive.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination