Currently viewing the category: "Wasps and Hornets"
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Subject: Believe to be blue wasp
Location: chandler AZ
June 6, 2016 10:15 am
Thinking it’s a blue wasp or mud wasp; didn’t mind the photo shoot wasn’t aggressive at all/
Signature: Doc

Steel Blue Cricket Hunter

Steel Blue Cricket Hunter

Dear Doc,
This is one of the most beautiful images we have ever received of a Steel Blue Cricket Hunter,
Chlorion aerarium, and the second image you provided where the Wasp is exiting the frame nicely illustrates the Thread Waist distinctive in the family Sphecidae.  According to BugGuide:  “Although generally not closely associated with humans, they are found wherever their hosts (Gryllus crickets) are found, which could include close proximity to homes … . Chlorion is usually found in open areas such as meadows, overgrown fields, dunes, beach edges, etc., although they may not necessarily hunt in the same habitat as they nest. ”

Steel Blue Cricket Hunter

Steel Blue Cricket Hunter

Daniel;
Thank you for the feedback I deeply appreciate it , I have to admit it is one of my favorite shots of the many I take around my yard. Please feel free to use the picture if you like.
peace

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Isodontia mexicana?
Location: South Central Texas
June 6, 2016 6:26 am
Howdy Bugman – I think we have the Frank Lloyd Wright of Grass-carrying wasps. Can’t think of anyone else that will appreciate this as much as me – happy Monday. 😀
Signature: Debbie Littrell Ventura

Grass Carrying Wasp Nest

Grass Carrying Wasp Nest

Dear Debbie,
That is one impressive Grass Carrying Wasp Nest.  Will you be suspending use of your hose until after the emergence?

Sure going to try. My garden hose using spouse is not nearly as impressed, but I’m working on his sensibilities. Have a fab week, Daniel. 😀

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Wood boring….wasp?
Location: 48108 Ann Arbor, MI
June 3, 2016 10:05 pm
Hello! These guys are making a condominium in my barn. What are they? I am in zone 6b SE Michigan.
Signature: Mary

Mason Wasp drilling nest

Mason Wasp drilling nest

Dear Mary,
We embarked on a relatively lengthy internet search in an attempt to identify your Mason Wasp in the Subfamily Eumeninae, beginning with unsuccessfully scanning through all the genera on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “Most species nest in pre-existing cavities (e.g., old borings in wood, hollow stems, crevices in rocks). They are called mason wasps because they use mud (or less commonly sand) as partitions between their brood cells. Some species construct nests in the ground.”  We then found this great site, Bug of the Week run by Michael J Raupp, Ph.D. that has a wonderful posting of Mason Wasps using pre-existing cavities.  At last we found a very similar looking individual identified as being in the genus
Symmorphus on Bug Eric, the awesome site run by Eric Eaton.  An image on BugGuide of Symmorphus canadensis looks very close to your species, but there is no indication that the females will excavate a nest if they cannot locate a pre-existing cavity.  We will contact Eric Eaton to get his opinion.  We suppose these beams may have been infested with some other boring insect and the holes were quickly appropriated by the Mason Wasps.

Mason Wasp Nests

Mason Wasp Nests

Oh thank you!
There’s a lot of them. They go into the holes, also.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Megarhyssa ?
Location: Petton, Shrewsbury, SY4 5TH
June 3, 2016 6:30 am
Hi, I live just outside Shrewsbury UK, this lovely chap just came into my house long enough for me to take a photo, is it a Megarhyssa and are they native to the UK. We do get quite a few Dragonflies around our pond and at first I thought it was one of them, obviously not – ant ideas?
Signature: Tom Brewin

Ichneumon: Rhyssa lineolata

Sabre Wasp

Dear Tom,
This Ichneumon is not in the genus
Megarhyssa, but rather, we believe it is related to Rhyssa lineolata, a species pictured on BugGuide.  We found Rhyssa persuasoria pictured on Nature Spot where it states:  “It searches for the larvae of Horntails or Longhorn Beetles which have buried in fallen timber. The female then uses her ovipositor to drill down to the larvae and then lay an egg which hatches and parasitize the poor host.” 

Thanks Daniel that’s very helpful, cheers … Tom

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Strange Flying Insect in Ohio
Location: Northeast Ohio, near water
June 1, 2016 5:51 am
Hello,
I was hoping you could help me to identify this strange flying insect I saw while hiking yesterday. It was spotted in Northeast Ohio near a stream.
Thank you,
Signature: Cody Couch

Stump Stabber

Stump Stabber

Dear Cody,
This is a Stump Stabber, a Giant Ichneumon in the genus Megarhyssa, and she is laying her eggs where they will parasitize the wood boring larvae of Wood Wasps known as Pigeon Horntails.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Costa Rica wasp or hornet with really painful sting
Location: Manzanillo, Costa Rica (small town on the southern Caribbean side)
June 1, 2016 12:46 am
Dear Sir,
Currently I am on a holiday in Costa Rica. Unfortunately today I bumped head first into a nest of black wasps or hornets, by accident. I have been stung in my head a dozen times and it was extremely painful. The nest was hanging underneath a tree on the beach of Manzanillo. I jumped in the water. The bugs died after the sting and left their piercer behind. The piercer was hard and light yellow. I think I managed to get them all out, but it is difficult to tell since the stings are in my hair. So now I am wondering: what are those little devils from hell and how dangerous are the stings? Do I need to get medical attention? I do not think I am allergic (it happend 10 hours ago and I am still not really swollen) but it still hurts a lot. Thank you very much in advance for your time!
Signature: Unlucky tourist

Wasp

Wasp

Dear Unlucky Tourist,
Though your insect sure appears to be a Wasp, we are not aware of any Wasps that lose their stingers upon stinging.  That is a characteristic of Bee stings.  According to the Boston Globe:  “For a bee, a sting is all or nothing; the bee loses its stinger and injects a relatively large volume of venom — typically about 50 micrograms.  A wasp, which retains its stinger, injects from 2 to 15 micrograms — but it can do it many times.”  The nest is that of a social Wasp, and unlike solitary Wasps that are relatively docile, social Wasps will defend the nest.  We believe we may have discovered the identity of your Wasps.  In Discover Magazine we found an article entitled “Stung” that states:  “One morning not long ago, an American entomologist named Justin Schmidt was making his way up the winding road to the Monteverde cloud forest in Costa Rica when he spotted Parachartergus fraternus, social wasps known both for the sculptured architecture of their hives and the ferocity with which they defend them.”  Then we found an article on America Pink that states:  “For a wasp species, Parachartergus fraternus is average in size. A typical
Parachartergus fraternus forager is about 11 mm long, 3 mm wide across its thorax, and weighs about 0.05 g.”  The Sting of the Wild does not describe the sting, but rather the ability of the wasps to spray venom.

Wasp Nest

Wasp Nest

Dear Daniel,
Thank you so much for your response. It is strange that they lost their stinger. I am questioning right now if it was in fact their stinger, or maybe the venom had some reaction with the sea water and turned hard? I most certainly pulled something hard out of every sting. It remains a mystery. I do not know if they sprayed any venom since it all went so fast. Hopefully this information might help you in the future with similar cases. Thanks so much!
Best regards,
Renske Anna

Wasp

Wasp

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination