Currently viewing the category: "Wasps and Hornets"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Whats this bug?
Location: Surrey, BC, Canada
July 24, 2016 10:32 am
Hi All!
I live in Surrey, BC Canada and had this bug land on my boat cover as I was doing some chores.
It was/is about 3cm long… ish… and just seemed pretty content to fly around after I took a few pics.
Never seen something like this and we’re hoping you could tell us what it is.
Thanks!
Signature: Richard

Wood Wasp

Wood Wasp

Dear Richard,
This beautiful, and harmless, Wood Wasp or Horntail is
Urocerus albicornis, a North American species, found, according to BugGuide, in “forested regions from southern boreal Canada south to NC-MP-NM-CA.”  BugGuide also notes:  “hosts include fir, larch, spruce, pine, Douglas-fir, hemlock, and western red cedar.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Help
Location: Ireland
July 16, 2016 12:24 pm
Hi,I’ve seen only one of these guys before. It’s maybe 1-2 inches long,as thick as a pen and the rest is in the picture. Would love to know what it is!! I thought it liked a bit like a fat mayfly
Signature: Thankyou

Wood Wasp

Wood Wasp

This is a Wood Wasp or Horntail, Urocerus gigas, and according to the Irish site Gardening.ie:  “Wood wasps, also called horntails, are pretty scary insects. They’re large, they’re fast and noisy fliers, they come in yellow and black warning colours and they have what looks like a ferocious stinger on their rear ends. But, although they’re doing their best to frighten you off, they’re completely harmless. ”  According to GeoGraph:  ” It does not sting; the feature which gives rise to its common name is an ovipositor, used to lay eggs in coniferous wood.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Weird bug
Location: Denver
July 21, 2016 6:06 pm
Just in the ya4d collecting japanese beetles when we saw a very weird bug.
Signature: LouAnn

Therion morio

Therion morio

Dear LouAnn,
This amazing looking parasitoid Ichneumon,
Therion morio, does not have a common name. According to BugGuide:  “Host: moth larvae, including Hyphantria cunea (Fall Webworm).”  The female in your images is probably searching for caterpillars upon which to lay an egg so that her young can feed on the living caterpillar, eventually killing it.

Therion morio

Therion morio

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this flying insect?
Location: Springtown PA
July 21, 2016 2:32 pm
This wasp type is burrowing holes in the dirt around a fig tree. I live in Springtown PA in Bucks County. This photo was taken at 5.25pm on July 21,2016. the temperature outside is 87 degrees.
Can you identify it please. Thank you Renee Sopko
Signature: Renee Sopko

Great Golden Digger Wasp makes nest

Great Golden Digger Wasp makes nest

Dear Renee,
The magnificent Great Golden Digger Wasp is a docile, solitary wasp that poses no threat to humans.  The female excavates a nest and then provisions it with Katydids for her young.  The Great Golden Digger Wasp is found across the continental U.S. and is a frequent visitor to our garden when the onions bloom, though we have yet to see one this year.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Rather large bee?
Location: Bayville, New Jersey
July 20, 2016 8:28 am
I’d like to know what this is.
Signature: Naomi

Cicada Killer

Cicada Killer

Dear Naomi,
This is a Cicada Killer, a large, non-aggressive, solitary wasp that hunts Cicadas.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Red mystery wasp
Location: near Ottawa, Ontario
July 18, 2016 3:43 pm
What is this beautiful little insect? I’m guessing some sort of wasp, maybe a parasitic wasp? I photographed it last week along Cedar Grove Nature Trail near Ottawa, where I see many fascinating tiny insects I can’t identify!
Signature: Suzanne

Ichneumon Stalks Caterpillar

Ichneumon Stalks Caterpillar

Dear Suzanne,
This is an amazing image.  We suspect that the Ichneumon Wasp, which you speculated correctly is a parasitoid, is stalking the Caterpillar.  Caterpillars are a common host to many species of Ichneumons.  Ichneumons are often very host specific, frequently limiting their prey to a single genus, or even a single species.  We are probably not even going to attempt to identify this Ichneumon beyond the family level as according to BugGuide, there are:  “About 5,000 described species in North America, possibly 3,000 more undescribed”  The caterpillar may be an Inchworm in the family Geometridae.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination