Currently viewing the category: "Horntails, Wood Wasps and Sawflies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Mystery bug?
Location: Rhode Island
October 14, 2015 5:15 pm
hi, this bug was found outside a few weeks ago this fall in Rhode Island. I was just wondering if you might be able to indentify it for me ? thank you 😀
Signature: -Zarah J

Pigeon Horntail

Pigeon Horntail

Dear Zarah,
This sure looks like a female Pigeon Horntail, a species with larvae that bore in the wood of diseased and compromised deciduous hardwood trees, which is why seeing it on a bed of pine needles is a bit odd.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: caterpiller? with white filaments on Black walnut
Location: SE Pennsylvania
September 7, 2015 4:52 am
Hi
Found these bugs on black walnut leaves, some of which were nibbled on.They looked like feathers from a distance.
Located in SE Pennsylvania, temps warm and humid, no rain recentlyf
Signature: Carol Huff

Butternut Woolly Worm

Butternut Woolly Worm

Dear Carol,
Even though they are feeding on black walnut leaves, the common name for your Sawfly Larvae is Butternut Woolly Worm,
Eriocampa juglandis.  Sawflies are non-stinging relatives of bees and wasps.  According to BugGuide:  “larvae peculiar, covered with long threads of wax.”

Butternut Woolly Worm

Butternut Woolly Worm

Thanks! Peculiar little buggers!
Ta
Carol

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this?
Location: Southern Wisconsin
September 5, 2015 7:39 pm
My mom saw several of these around her yard today. What are they? Do they make nests or sting?
Signature: Heather S

Pigeon Horntail

Pigeon Horntail

Dear Heather,
This is a female Pigeon Horntail, a type of Wood Wasp.  The female lays her eggs beneath the bark of dead or dying trees, and the larvae are wood borers.  They neither sting nor build nests.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Giant wasp…borrows in tree giving birth? WTB?
Location: West Chester, Pennsylvania
September 4, 2015 4:22 am
I live in West Chester, Pa, and took these photos on September 3rd, 2015. They were taken in my backyard, on a dead tree…that I am in process of removing. I noticed this very large wasp looking insect, it was 2inches I length….I know because I measured it. It was near the base of the tree and looked like it was searching for something. I watched as it found a location and a long black “leg” like thing injected itself into the tree bark . I know it was not a leg because all of the insects legs were yellow and this was black, thinner and was being pushed into the tree. The insect started moving its body back and forth and the black “leg” got shorter and shorter until it was almost not even seen. It stayed there for at least a half an hour and when I came back out side it had moved itself to another part of the tree and was doing the whole process over again. Now, I am assuming it was putting its eggs into the tree bark. I love insects and ha ve never seen a bug this long, or a stinger this long, could you tell me what bug this is? Thanks for your time and your help!
Signature: J Hartz

Pigeon Horntail Ovipositing

Pigeon Horntail Ovipositing

Dear J Hartz,
Thanks so much for submitting your excellent images and detailed account of this Pigeon Horntail,
Tremex columba, in the act of ovipositing.  Your speculation is quite accurate.  Pigeon Horntails are Wood Wasps whose larvae tunnel in and feed on dead wood of deciduous trees.

PIgeon Horntail Ovipositing

PIgeon Horntail Ovipositing

Thanks so much for the information! I love looking at all types of insects and studying their life cycle.   You have a great websites and it is very helpful, keep up the great work!
Sincerely-
J Hartz

PIgeon Horntail Ovipositing

PIgeon Horntail Ovipositing

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: orange dog wasp
Location: courtice arena, ontario canada
September 1, 2015 5:49 pm
sorry lost my last submission trying again. Found this orange looking wasp that has a puppy face. search but could not find any identification on this guy. Was really lucky he sat still and posed for me. sept 1/2015 around 6;30 pm in an open field .
Thanks
Signature: Terri Martin

Male Pigeon Horntail

Male Pigeon Horntail

Dear Terri,
Though we have no shortage of images of Pigeon Horntails on our site, male specimens like your individual are at a premium.  Almost all the images of Pigeon Horntails on our site are females, and we even have a good number of ovipositing Pigeon Horntails.  These Wood Wasps are known scientifically as
Tremex columba, the sole food eaten by larval Stump Stabbers, Megarhyssa atrata.  The female Stump Stabber has a much longer ovipositor than the female Pigeon Horntail because unlike her prey, she must lay her egg with incredible precision so the hatchling can locate its host.  Here is a BugGuide image of a male Pigeon Horntail.  By the way, your images are gorgeous.

Male Pigeon Horntail

Male Pigeon Horntail

Thanks Daniel.  Hoping one day to find an insect that no one can identify then I can name it.

Pigeon Horntail

Pigeon Horntail

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Giant wasp
Location: Middle of, Ontario canada
August 24, 2015 10:16 am
Can you identify this bug?
Signature: I dont know what this means

Pigeon Horntail

Pigeon Horntail

This is a Pigeon Horntail, a species of Wood Wasp.  The female uses her ovipositor to lay eggs beneath the bark of unhealthy trees.  Pigeon Horntails do not sting.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination