Currently viewing the category: "Horntails, Wood Wasps and Sawflies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Asian Hornet?
Location: Salt Lake City Utah
May 27, 2016 6:54 pm
Hi! I saw this on my globe willow last summer. No one knew what it was. Even the Terminix guy didn’t know.
Signature: Lee

Pigeon Horntail

Pigeon Horntail

Dear Lee,
This is not an Oriental Hornet, which to the best of our knowledge has not been introduced to North America, nor is it a European Hornet which has been introduced to North America but is only reported as far west as Texas on BugGuide.  This is a native, non-stinging Wood Wasp known as a Pigeon Horntail.  Your individual is an ovipositing female who is laying her eggs beneath the bark of your willow tree, indicating there are possibly health issues with the tree.  We will be postdating your submission to go live in June while our editorial staff is away from the office.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Midas like bug
Location: NW Washington state
May 17, 2016 8:45 pm
Hi, We have an odd bug we’ve never seen. It was seen today 30 miles south of Canada/ US border in Western Washington.
It’s about 1 and 1/4 inches long.
Primarily black with striped legs and long cream antenna.
It was attracted to a newly washed black car.
Signature: Claudia

Wood Wasp

Wood Wasp

Dear Claudia,
This is a female Wood Wasp,
Urocerus albicornis, a species that does not sting.  According to BugGuide:  “hosts include fir, larch, spruce, pine, Douglas-fir, hemlock, and western red cedar.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Black and yellow
Location: East Sussex, UK
May 1, 2016 3:35 pm
Spotted in my garden on April 30th…unfortunately dead.
The lighter patch on the body is in fact bright yellow but the photo is not that well lit.
Signature: Sue W

Birch Sawfly

Birch Sawfly

Dear Sue,
Your Sawfly reminds us so much of the North American Elm Sawfly that we searched for members of the genus in the UK.  We quickly found the Birch Sawfly,
Cimbex femoratus, on NatureSpot where it is described as “Up to 25mm long, the largest British Sawfly. The adult is easily recognised by the pale band on its shiny black abdomen. Wings are smoky brown colour with dark brown margins. The antennae are yellow tipped.”  The site also states:  “Local throughout Britain, not very common” and “Uncommon in Leicestershire and Rutland.”  There is a very nice image on Wild About Britain.  Sawflies are solitary, non-stinging relatives of Ants, Bees and Wasps.

Thank you very much Daniel.
Greatly appreciate your swift response.
All the best
Sue

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: scary, shiny black insect with yellow antennae
Location: Fayette County, Illinois
April 25, 2016 11:47 am
I came across this scary looking, very shiny dark blue/black insect with yellow legs and antennae while mushroom hunting in April. I had my camera ready and he was very cooperative, although afterwards I realized I probably shouldn’t have been so close. I have tried to google his description but I can’t find anything that looks exactly like him. I’m very curious. Any help would be appreciated!
Signature: Jilla Young

Sawfly

Sawfly

Dear Jilla,
This is an Elm Sawfly, and it appears to be on an elm twig.  The Elm Sawfly,
Cimbex americana, is the largest North American Sawfly.  Though it is related to stinging bees and wasps, it is incapable of stinging, so though it appears formidable, it is actually quite harmless.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Need help with ID
Location: Flower Mound, TX
April 9, 2016 8:01 pm
I saw this today on my back patio. I tried searching the internet, but I can’t find anything to definitively identify. Its behavior was odd … pincers opening and closing, legs moving in and out, abdomen raising and lowering. It also ended up on its back shortly after the pics were taken still performing the sane actions.
Signature: Kari

Elm Sawfly

Elm Sawfly

Dear Kari,
This is an Elm Sawfly,
Cimbex americana, a non-stinging relative of bees and wasps.  There is some variability in the coloration, but this BugGuide image is a good color match to your individual.  We don’t know what caused the unusual behavior that occurred just before death, perhaps it was just the death throes. 

Elm Sawfly

Elm Sawfly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spiderwasp, spiderwasp, does whatever a spiderwasp does…
Location: Cincinnati, oh
April 2, 2016 2:31 pm
Saw this painting a sign atop a 3 story buidling, it was huge… non aggressive, just kinda walking around. Don’t know if it really is a spider wasp, but from what I looked into, says it might be…
Signature: E. Hutchins

Pigeon Horntail Ovipositing

Pigeon Horntail Ovipositing

Dear E. Hutchins,
This is NOT a Spider Wasp.  It is a female Pigeon Horntail, a species of Wood Wasp, and she is in the process of ovipositing or laying eggs.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination