Currently viewing the category: "Horntails, Wood Wasps and Sawflies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Caterpillar???
Location: Melbourne, Victoria (Australia)
March 21, 2017 10:36 pm
Me and my sister found this strange caterpillar thing outside. Lately we’ve been having very rainy and humid weather so I don’t know if that caused it’s appearance?
We’d love to know what it is!
Thanks!
Signature: Bridget

Sawfly Larva

Dear Bridget,
This is a Sawfly Larva and it is very easy to confuse a Sawfly Larva for a Caterpillar, but instead of maturing into a butterfly or moth, it will mature into a non-stinging relative of bees and wasps.  We cannot currently access our main “go to” website for Australian identifications, Brisbane Insects, but this does look like a Longtailed Sawfly larva we have in our archives.

Sawfly Larva

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Wasp?
Location: Rockmart, Ga.
March 9, 2017 3:30 am
Can’t figure out what this is???
Signature: Mary

Webspinning or Leafrolling Sawfly

Dear Mary,
We believe we have correctly identified your Webspinning or Leafrolling Sawfly as
Acantholyda maculiventris or a closely related species based on this BugGuide image.  BugGuide has reports from Mississippi and North Carolina, so your location seems to be within the range of the species.  The species is also pictured on the Farmapest site, though we do not understand what has been written about it.  You need to scroll down to page to view the image.  Sawflies are non-stinging relatives of bees and wasps.

Webspinning or Leafrolling Sawfly

Thank you guys soooo……. much😀😀😀

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bottlebrush Sawfly?
Location: Pakenham Victoria Australia
February 16, 2017 8:08 pm
Hi, just wanting confirmation that this is indeed a Bottlebrush Sawfly. Found it sunning on the edge of a Rose, possibly having a feed of the petal? This is sited in Suburban Pakenham, just out of Melbourne, Australia on a mild Summers day, February 17th 2017.
Signature: Brian C

Bottlebrush Sawfly

Dear Brian C,
This is indeed a Bottlebrush Sawfly,
Pterygophorus cinctus, and since males, one of which is pictured on FlickR, have feathered or pectinate antennae, your individual is a female.

Bottlebrush Sawfly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: I’m having trouble identifying what I believe is a species of wasp.
Location: Bayside area, Melbourne Australia.
February 2, 2017 6:13 pm
G’day BUGMAN!!
I’ve got another conundrum for you when you get some spare time.
I saw this bug at Mum’s the other day, he was just chilling out on a blade of grass so I took some pictures. He’s a little bit cute, but also looks a bit waspish. From the pages I’ve looked up to identify Australian wasp species I’m having trouble finding an accurate identity for him. The closest I’ve come across is a Potter Wasp, but from pictures they aren’t similar enough.
As you can see my little wasp friend has an all black face & eyes & no tiny stick waist. Potter wasps appear to have a much thinner, or longer thin section of their abdomen. Also they have more orange on their face & antenne than my little friend.
Would you know of any sites in Australia that allowing uploading of pictures to ask about bug identification like you do?
Your website is so much fun to browse around.
Thank you again for your time.
Have a wonderful day!
Signature: Kindest regards, manda.

Bottlebrush Sawfly

Hello again Manda,
Since the internet is global, whyever would you want to locate an Australian counterpart to our site?  That said, we know of no Australian counterpart to our site, though we do have a sister site in Brazil called Insetologia.  Our editorial staff (as if we don’t have enough to do) has toyed with the idea of applying for grant funding to venture into Australia.  We tend to field many more questions from Australia and South Africa from December through February when much of the northern hemisphere is in the depths of winter, which is the main reason we created a WTB Down Under? tag many years ago, and with 880 unique posts (with yours being 881), it is our most popular tag, followed distantly by Bug Love.  Though its coloration resembles that of a Potter Wasp, its antennae are quite distinctive.  Your non-stinging Hymenopteran is a Bottlebrush Sawfly,
Pterygophorus cinctus, and according to Jungle Dragon:  “Sawfly is the common name for insects belonging to suborder Symphyta of the order Hymenoptera. Sawflies do not possess the distinctive thin waist of the other hymenopterans, nor do they possess a sting. Their name comes from the female’s saw-like egg-laying tube, which she uses to make a slit in a plant leaf or stem, into which she lays her eggs. The adult Bottlebrush Sawfly has an orange and black banded body, with a wingspan of about 2cm. Males have feathery (pectinate) antennae.”  The lack of feathery antennae indicates your individual is a female.

Bottlebrush Sawfly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Sawfly larva identification
Location: East Gippsland, Victoria, Australia
January 14, 2017 11:05 pm
Hello. I am wondering if you can help with the identification of this interesting creature? I think it is a sawfly, family Pergidae, subfamily Perginae (I am happy to be corrected :)), but can’t get any further than that. It was spotted in mid-January, smack-bang in the middle of our Australian summer. It was approximately 2 inches long and moving alone along a fence rail. Nearby trees included two different species of eucalypt and and a she-oak.
Any insights you have would be greatly appreciated. Thanks bug guys! 🙂
Signature: Jacinta Richardson

Spitfire

Dear Jacinta,
This is indeed a Sawfly Larva, and in Australia they are known as Spitfires because of the posture they assume when they are disturbed.  We have a group of similar looking Spitfires in our archives.  Based on information on the Australian Museum site, we believe your identification is correct, but we are unable to provide a conclusive species name at this time.

Spitfire

Hi Daniel
Thank you so much for your response. I will keep researching and if I find any additional information I will let you know. I’ll also check back in case other viewers have further insights.
Thanks again. I love the site!
Jacinta

Spitfire

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Name that bug!
Location: Vancouver WA
January 12, 2017 9:23 pm
This moth (?) evidently came in on the firewood. What kind of bug is this ? I could not find an image on the internet but I don’t know what search words to use.
Signature: Kurious Jo

Introduced Pine Sawfly

Dear Kurious Jo,
Based on this BugGuide image, we feel quite confident this is a male Introduced Pine Sawfly,
Diprion similis.  According to BugGuide:  “adventive from Europe; ne. US (ME-MN to NC-TN) + WA; in Canada, NF-MB & BC.”  We first reported the larvae in Washington in 2008.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination