Currently viewing the category: "Horntails, Wood Wasps and Sawflies"
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Subject: Bottlebrush Sawfly?
Location: Pakenham Victoria Australia
February 16, 2017 8:08 pm
Hi, just wanting confirmation that this is indeed a Bottlebrush Sawfly. Found it sunning on the edge of a Rose, possibly having a feed of the petal? This is sited in Suburban Pakenham, just out of Melbourne, Australia on a mild Summers day, February 17th 2017.
Signature: Brian C

Bottlebrush Sawfly

Dear Brian C,
This is indeed a Bottlebrush Sawfly,
Pterygophorus cinctus, and since males, one of which is pictured on FlickR, have feathered or pectinate antennae, your individual is a female.

Bottlebrush Sawfly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: I’m having trouble identifying what I believe is a species of wasp.
Location: Bayside area, Melbourne Australia.
February 2, 2017 6:13 pm
G’day BUGMAN!!
I’ve got another conundrum for you when you get some spare time.
I saw this bug at Mum’s the other day, he was just chilling out on a blade of grass so I took some pictures. He’s a little bit cute, but also looks a bit waspish. From the pages I’ve looked up to identify Australian wasp species I’m having trouble finding an accurate identity for him. The closest I’ve come across is a Potter Wasp, but from pictures they aren’t similar enough.
As you can see my little wasp friend has an all black face & eyes & no tiny stick waist. Potter wasps appear to have a much thinner, or longer thin section of their abdomen. Also they have more orange on their face & antenne than my little friend.
Would you know of any sites in Australia that allowing uploading of pictures to ask about bug identification like you do?
Your website is so much fun to browse around.
Thank you again for your time.
Have a wonderful day!
Signature: Kindest regards, manda.

Bottlebrush Sawfly

Hello again Manda,
Since the internet is global, whyever would you want to locate an Australian counterpart to our site?  That said, we know of no Australian counterpart to our site, though we do have a sister site in Brazil called Insetologia.  Our editorial staff (as if we don’t have enough to do) has toyed with the idea of applying for grant funding to venture into Australia.  We tend to field many more questions from Australia and South Africa from December through February when much of the northern hemisphere is in the depths of winter, which is the main reason we created a WTB Down Under? tag many years ago, and with 880 unique posts (with yours being 881), it is our most popular tag, followed distantly by Bug Love.  Though its coloration resembles that of a Potter Wasp, its antennae are quite distinctive.  Your non-stinging Hymenopteran is a Bottlebrush Sawfly,
Pterygophorus cinctus, and according to Jungle Dragon:  “Sawfly is the common name for insects belonging to suborder Symphyta of the order Hymenoptera. Sawflies do not possess the distinctive thin waist of the other hymenopterans, nor do they possess a sting. Their name comes from the female’s saw-like egg-laying tube, which she uses to make a slit in a plant leaf or stem, into which she lays her eggs. The adult Bottlebrush Sawfly has an orange and black banded body, with a wingspan of about 2cm. Males have feathery (pectinate) antennae.”  The lack of feathery antennae indicates your individual is a female.

Bottlebrush Sawfly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Sawfly larva identification
Location: East Gippsland, Victoria, Australia
January 14, 2017 11:05 pm
Hello. I am wondering if you can help with the identification of this interesting creature? I think it is a sawfly, family Pergidae, subfamily Perginae (I am happy to be corrected :)), but can’t get any further than that. It was spotted in mid-January, smack-bang in the middle of our Australian summer. It was approximately 2 inches long and moving alone along a fence rail. Nearby trees included two different species of eucalypt and and a she-oak.
Any insights you have would be greatly appreciated. Thanks bug guys! 🙂
Signature: Jacinta Richardson

Spitfire

Dear Jacinta,
This is indeed a Sawfly Larva, and in Australia they are known as Spitfires because of the posture they assume when they are disturbed.  We have a group of similar looking Spitfires in our archives.  Based on information on the Australian Museum site, we believe your identification is correct, but we are unable to provide a conclusive species name at this time.

Spitfire

Hi Daniel
Thank you so much for your response. I will keep researching and if I find any additional information I will let you know. I’ll also check back in case other viewers have further insights.
Thanks again. I love the site!
Jacinta

Spitfire

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Name that bug!
Location: Vancouver WA
January 12, 2017 9:23 pm
This moth (?) evidently came in on the firewood. What kind of bug is this ? I could not find an image on the internet but I don’t know what search words to use.
Signature: Kurious Jo

Introduced Pine Sawfly

Dear Kurious Jo,
Based on this BugGuide image, we feel quite confident this is a male Introduced Pine Sawfly,
Diprion similis.  According to BugGuide:  “adventive from Europe; ne. US (ME-MN to NC-TN) + WA; in Canada, NF-MB & BC.”  We first reported the larvae in Washington in 2008.

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Subject: WTB?!
Location: Denver area (larva)
December 12, 2016 10:37 pm
Hello,
I’m trying to positively identify three insects so their Genus species can be part of the file name which will have the Genus species of the flowering plant, too. (You’ll see.)
…The (I think sawfly) larva is on a pincushion cactus blossom and might be two inches long? This is mid-May along the southern edge of the Denver area (Highland Ranch).
I appreciate your even taking the time to consider these.
Best,
Signature: Mark Bennett

Probably Sawfly Larva

Probably Sawfly Larva

Ed Note:  We requested higher resolution images from Mark, and he complied, supplying this additional information.

Hello Daniel,
Here are the three images in their uncropped state. Note, these uncropped images are artwork to me, not science. As such, they are entered in competition at a gallery and could, with luck and the favor of the judges, be selected for display. And, with more luck and perseverance, become salable prints. THUS, please observe my copyright restrictions — you may use the images on your web site and archive, for educational purposes, but they can not be reproduced or shared or in any method used for commercial purposes by you, What’s That Bug?, or any other entity without my express permission. If these terms are acceptable, and accepted, then we’re good. If not, then please delete the attached file(s).
Thanks. I do hope these help the organization.
Mark Bennett Photography
markbennettphoto.com

Escobaria vivipara blossom Symphyta Dolerus sp. sawfly larva Littleton nature walk 20120521 25cv

Escobaria vivipara blossom
Symphyta Dolerus sp. sawfly larva
Littleton nature walk 20120521 25cv

December 18, 2016
Hi again Mark,
We are finally getting around to posting what we agree appears to be a sawfly larva.  We will attempt to contact Eric Eaton to see if he agrees.  We will be postdating this submission to go live to our site while we are away from the office on Christmas Day because of the beautiful colors represented in your artful image.

Sounds like fun! It is a beautiful image, if I say so myself, and is my favorite for inclusion in the upcoming gallery show in Fort Collins, Colorado. The theme is “animalia” and I’m hoping that my “animal,” being present but not the apparent, initial, focus of the photo will catch the jurors’ eyes.
Have a happy holiday,
Mark

Eric Eaton Confirms Sawfly Larva identification.
Yes, the other is a sawfly larva.  Great job!
Eric Eaton
author Kaufman Field Guide to Insects of North America
http://bugeric.blogspot.com/

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Larva ID
Location: Chimney Tops Capstone
October 13, 2016 1:35 pm
Hello there! Today I was wondering if I could have and ID conformation given to a larva. This larva has been posted to BugGuide (it is my image) and we are currently undecided on an ID. At first I thought it could be a caterpillar, but I am more convinced that it is Gilpinia hercyniae. The thing is, we are not sure about the range of this sawfly larva. It seems to be that G. hercyniae is an uncommon insect, and i have yet to find records of it in TN. Just wanted to see what you guys thought about it. Thanks for your time! Link to the BG page http://bugguide.net/node/view/1297521
It was found on 8/24/16 in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park at the Chimney Tops Capstone , in Sevier County, Tennessee.
~35° 37.725’N 83° 28.682’W
~4,700 feet above sea level
Signature: Cicada Lover

Possibly European Spruce Sawfly

Possibly European Spruce Sawfly

Dear Cicada Lover,
We agree with you that this appears like it might be a European Spruce Sawfly larva as pictured on BugGuide.  Have you any other images?  It would be great if you had an image where we are able to count the prolegs.  According to Natural Resources Canada:  “Native to Europe, the European spruce sawfly was first reported in Canada in 1922 and in the United States in 1929, but did not really attract the attention of foresters until 1930, when it caused severe damage to spruce stands in Quebec’s Gaspé peninsula. The infestation spread rapidly throughout northeastern North America. The discovery of this infestation led to the development of a national forest insect inventory network consisting of the states in the northeastern U.S.   Sawfly populations began to decline in 1938 with the emergence of a viral disease that affects the larvae, returning to endemic levels in 1945, where it has since remained throughout Canada. Its current Canadian range extends from the Atlantic provinces to Manitoba.”  Tennessee is further south than any reported BugGuide sightings.  Please let us know if you learn anything new from the BugGuide posting.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination