Currently viewing the category: "Horntails, Wood Wasps and Sawflies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Landed next to me
Location: Yakima, Washington
May 26, 2017 10:35 am
Hey, this guy landed next to me here at Yakima Training Center and was wondering if you could ID it for me. Closest thing i could find was a grasshopper hunter wasp, but it doesnt look right. Thanks a bunch!
Signature: Chance Golden

Horntail

Dear Chance,
We are relatively certain that this is a Horntail in the family Siricidae which is pictured on BugGuide, but we are not sure about the species.  What appears to be a stinger is actually the ovipositor of the female, and she uses that organ to lay her eggs.  Eggs are laid beneath the surface of the bark of trees, and the larvae are wood boring insects.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Wasp like bug?
Location: Rockville, MD
April 4, 2017 2:31 pm
Hi!
We recently discovered a lot of these wasp-like bugs near the front windows of our house. They range in size from 1/4″ to 1″ and seem to walk more than they fly. Their antennae wave around rapidly too. I tried looking up parasitic wasps and various nymphs but have come up empty. Would love to know what these guys are!
Signature: Audrey

Xiphydriid Wood Wasp

Dear Audrey,
We found your Wasp in our archives where we identified it as a Spotted Wood Wasp,
Xiphydria maculata, though once we turned to BugGuide, we discovered this species does not have a common name.  BugGuide indicates it “Prefers maples.”  Of the family Xiphydriidae, BugGuide states:  “The larvae bore in the dead or decaying wood of deciduous trees.”  According to Connecticut Wilderness:  “A parasitic wood wasp. Wood wasps drill into a tree by using an ovipositor. This is a tube which is like a needle. It contains two interlocking valves. Each valve is covered with teeth that are backward- facing. Black and white/cream colored.  Reportedly prefers maple trees.”  Perhaps you have some maple firewood in the house, or perhaps you have recently acquired a piece of furniture that was infested with wood boring larvae that emerged inside your home.

Xiphydriid Wood Wasp

Thanks for getting back to me so quickly! We brought some wood in from some branches that dropped in our yard and we do have a maple, so that makes sense.

Xiphydriid Wood Wasp

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this?
Location: Windsor victoria
April 2, 2017 10:02 pm
Dear bug man.
We were at a local park and saw this reddish brown caterpillar type bug with a stinger on the tip of its tail. It only had 6 legs that we could see
We took a photo to try to help us identify it.
My 11year old mitchell is fascinated
Signature: Nicole Hoskin

Long-tailed Sawfly Larva

Dear Nicole,
Though it resembles a Caterpillar, this is actually the larva of a Sawfly.  Sawflies are non-stinging relatives of Wasps and Bees, and adult Sawflies are generally mistaken for Wasps or Flies.  Based on images posted to the Brisbane Insect website, we believe your individual is in the subfamily Pterygophorinae, the Long-Tailed Sawflies.

Long-Tailed Sawfly Larva

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Caterpillar???
Location: Melbourne, Victoria (Australia)
March 21, 2017 10:36 pm
Me and my sister found this strange caterpillar thing outside. Lately we’ve been having very rainy and humid weather so I don’t know if that caused it’s appearance?
We’d love to know what it is!
Thanks!
Signature: Bridget

Sawfly Larva

Dear Bridget,
This is a Sawfly Larva and it is very easy to confuse a Sawfly Larva for a Caterpillar, but instead of maturing into a butterfly or moth, it will mature into a non-stinging relative of bees and wasps.  We cannot currently access our main “go to” website for Australian identifications, Brisbane Insects, but this does look like a Longtailed Sawfly larva we have in our archives.

Sawfly Larva

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Wasp?
Location: Rockmart, Ga.
March 9, 2017 3:30 am
Can’t figure out what this is???
Signature: Mary

Webspinning or Leafrolling Sawfly

Dear Mary,
We believe we have correctly identified your Webspinning or Leafrolling Sawfly as
Acantholyda maculiventris or a closely related species based on this BugGuide image.  BugGuide has reports from Mississippi and North Carolina, so your location seems to be within the range of the species.  The species is also pictured on the Farmapest site, though we do not understand what has been written about it.  You need to scroll down to page to view the image.  Sawflies are non-stinging relatives of bees and wasps.

Webspinning or Leafrolling Sawfly

Thank you guys soooo……. much😀😀😀

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bottlebrush Sawfly?
Location: Pakenham Victoria Australia
February 16, 2017 8:08 pm
Hi, just wanting confirmation that this is indeed a Bottlebrush Sawfly. Found it sunning on the edge of a Rose, possibly having a feed of the petal? This is sited in Suburban Pakenham, just out of Melbourne, Australia on a mild Summers day, February 17th 2017.
Signature: Brian C

Bottlebrush Sawfly

Dear Brian C,
This is indeed a Bottlebrush Sawfly,
Pterygophorus cinctus, and since males, one of which is pictured on FlickR, have feathered or pectinate antennae, your individual is a female.

Bottlebrush Sawfly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination