Currently viewing the category: "Hornets and Yellow Jackets"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Insect
Location: San antonio, tx
December 19, 2015 6:48 am
We found this colorful insect under a tarp. We did some research and think maybe a hornet but im not sure. I have never seen one like this before.
Signature: S. Mainka

Queen Southern Yellowjacket

Queen Southern Yellowjacket

Dear S. Mainka,
This sure looks like a Queen Southern Yellowjacket,
Vespula squamosa, based on this BugGuide image.  Since it is December and you found her under a tarp, we believe she was settling in for winter hibernation.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Mystery Hornet?
Location: Souderton, Pennsylvanis
September 19, 2015 4:32 am
Hello, we killed this hornet (?) after it flew into our house. It was about 6 AM, on Sept 19. The weather was cool and foggy. We live in South Eastern Pennsylvania in a semi-rural area with lots of farms and trees. After we killed this one we saw another one outside the house buzzing around our porch light. The shape of the abdomen reminds me of a hornet, but it doesn’t match any picture that I could find of species typical for the area. Thanks so much for any help you can offer on this guy, and all of your efforts to educate people about the insects in their lives!!
Signature: Alison

European Hornet

European Hornet

Dear Alison,
This European Hornet is a non-native species introduced into North America during the nineteenth century.  European Hornets are not considered aggressive toward humans, and it is most likely that no threat was posed when it entered your home.  Creatures that inadvertently enter the home can be safely relocated outdoors by trapping them in an inverted glass with the opening covered by a post card.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bald Faced Hornets
Location: Mill Bay, BC
September 1, 2015 5:24 pm
Thought you would like to see these pictures of bald faced hornets and their basketball sized nest on Vancouver Island. My friend was picking apples and this was about three feet away he said. I thought they were quite aggressive, but it is a cool day today so maybe he was lucky.
Signature: Sharon Jackson

Bald Faced Hornets Nest

Bald Faced Hornets Nest

Dear Sharon,
Bald Faced Hornets are not considered aggressive, but they will defend the nest by stinging, and multiple stings would be painful and could possibly trigger an allergic reaction in some people.

Bald Faced Hornets

Bald Faced Hornets

Thanks, Daniel. I guess the webpage I was reading was not as smart as you are! J
They sure are big buggers, though, aren’t they??
Sharon

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Ginormous Yellow Jacket/Wasp/Spawn of Satan
Location: Suburbs of Cleveland, OH; near the Cuyahoga Valley National Park
August 12, 2015 5:46 am
Dear Bugman,
I hope this message finds you well. Every Spring, I find a few of these monstrosities in my house, and they kinda creep me out. This year, as usual, they were buzzing around my windows, trying to escape into the outside world, where they can then eat children and small pets, but I’ve also found them outside my house this Summer. Recently, I found two engaged in a duel to the death on my driveway, then, last night, I heard what I thought was a helicopter landing in my front yard, but it turned out to be another one of these big sumbitches buzzing around my porch light. Finally, this morning, I saw what I assumed was a hummingbird, but it was actually another one of these big jerks, which landed briefly on my driveway, picked something up, then scurried off to a nearby oak tree. Any chance you can please tell me what they are, and whether or not I should just burn my house down to get rid of them? Alive, they are about 2″ long, but shrink to about an inch after an entire can of wasp/hornet spray has been deployed against them. Thanks for your help!
Signature: Kenneth F Mucha II

European Hornets:  Battling Queens

European Hornets: Battling Queens

Dear Kenneth,
These are European Hornets,
Vespa crabro, an Invasive Exotic species that according to BugGuide was introduced to eastern North America in the nineteenth century.  These are top of the food chain insect predators that are able to dispatch much larger native predators including Dragonflies.  According to BugGuide:  “Paper nest is built in hollow trees, or in human structures such as attics. Adults come to lights.”  We cannot recall any reports of people being stung by European Hornets, but we imagine they will defend the nest and we also imagine the sting could be quite painful.  We believe your images document battling Queen European Hornets, perhaps fighting over prime real estate for nest construction.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Large black wasp/bee?
Location: Ajax, Ontario, Canada
August 11, 2015 12:29 pm
Hey there, I seem to have quite a few of these rather large insects enjoying the flowers on the backyard.
Other than some white markings on either end, they are all black, about 1 to 1,1/4in long very solid body.
I have never seen anything like these before, so I’m not sure if they are yet another ‘import’ or I’ve just never really noticed them in the past?
Signature: Mr. Ashley Mills

Bald Faced Hornet

Bald Faced Hornet

Dear Mr. Ashley Mills,
Your images are of native social wasps known as Bald Faced Hornets.  In the spring, a mated Queen Bald Faced Hornet begins a new nest by chewing wood into pulp and constructing the nest from paper.  By the end of the season, the nest is quite large and populated by hundreds of worker Hornets.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Swamp Darner attacked by hornet
Location: Rochester, NY
August 10, 2015 1:51 pm
Hi!
While trying to identify the dragonfly in my picture I came across this post of yours:
https://www.whatsthatbug.com/2009/09/03/european-hornet-eats-dragonfly-unknown-darner/
and the comments led me to correctly identify the dragonfly as a Swamp Darner, as it is identical to the photos and descriptions on BugGuide, here: http://www.bugguide.net/node/view/2584 The dragonfly pictured was easily 4-5 inches in length.
I believe the attacker may be a European Hornet, as it look very similar to the insect in the original post?
I took this photo August 8th in Rochester, NY. I noticed a loud buzzing and the sound of the dragonfly hitting the glass door several times as he valiantly attempted to keep flying and fend off his attacker. The efforts became more feeble and the hornet appeared to be crawling around going straight for the underside of the thorax. The dragonfly kept curling his abdomen, but after several minutes he seemed pretty much gone, and I could have sworn I heard crunching- the hornet eating his prize.
It was a pretty incredible sight; the kids I was babysitting had very different reactions. The 9 year old, “it’s probably laying eggs in the dragonfly,” and walked away unconcerned. The 2 year old kept trying to go touch it and seemed very concerned for the dragonfly’s well-being.
I thought you might appreciate the picture. Sorry it’s captioned; it’s the only one I had time to get while keeping a 2 year old away from touching!
Signature: Jamie

Swamp Darner attacked bt European Hornet

Swamp Darner attacked bt European Hornet

Hi Jamie,
Your image is an excellent documentation of this Food Chain scenario, but your written account of the observation is especially interesting.  We agree the predator is a European Hornet, and the long term effect that these top of the Food Chain introduced Invasive Exotic predators is having on the native insect population like this Swamp Darner may or may not be significant.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination