Currently viewing the category: "Hornets and Yellow Jackets"
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Carnivorous Hornets
Several weeks ago, I watched one of these insects carry away a chunk of grilled buffalo burger the size of its head. Upon returning from vacation, we found them ravaging our strawberry patch– they have a ferocious appetite and I assume their actions are reflective of the drought we are experiencing. I believe they are hornets since they have pointed abdomens and appear to lack pollen baskets. Nor do they resemble the paper wasps or mud daubers we have here in the northern Black Hills of South Dakota. Any ideas?Thanks
Jay

Hi Jay,
Yellow Jackets can be troublesome spoilsports at picnics, bar-be-ques, fairs and carnivals. They frequently swarm the trash bins for discarded food and sweets and they will sting.

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bees or wasps
Hi:
I found these bees (or are they wasps?) on a tree root in our yard in central North Carolina. It looks like they’re burrowing into the wood, but they don’t look like carpenter bees to me. I have seen up to 4 at a time with their heads partly in the root. I also think I can see one inside the burrow. Any ideas?

Giant Hornets, Vespa crabro germana, were introduced to this country in the mid 1800s. They are gathering wood pulp for their large paper nest.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Hello.
A friend directed me to your site. I have, what of course I think, are some interesting photos of a hornet’s nest being built over a birdhouse. Apparently, cold Minnesota winters warrant building nests with extra insulation! I am attaching one, but if you are interested in more, let me know. In this view you can see the hornet’s have are working on the nest and have built not only on the outside, but the inside as well. Enjoy.
D Rossbach

Hi D.,
Your photo is pretty great. The builders are Yellow Jackets. Mom in Ohio frequently gets paper wasp nests in her birdhouses. We have also gotten images of Red-Tailed Bumblebees building in birdhouses. Perhaps someone should market the wasp and bee house.

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Wow!
I found this huge wasp-like thing on my screened in porch (the screen is torn). I took live photos with a crayon for reference, but could not get it very close. It died by the next day. What on Earth is this and why is it so big? I have never seen one this big! Thanks for your help!
Leigh-Ann Burke
Hardyston, NJ

Hi Leigh-Ann,
The Giant Hornet, Vespa crabro germana, lives up to its name. I has to be big to be called the Giant Hornet. If you think this is big, you should see a Tarantula Hawk.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

It’s eating my fence
Hello, Bugman:
I happened upon your site today for the first time. It1s wonderful!! I looked for this bug in your wasp section and I think that it1s a Bald Faced Hornet. But, why is it eating my fence?
Thank you.
Mary Ann Sumner
Miller Beach, Indiana

Hi Mary Ann,
Bald Faced Hornets are Paper Wasps. They chew wood pulp to make the paper for their nest. She is using the wood fiber in your fence to create wood pulp and then paper.

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Do you know what kind of wasp or hornet this is? I live in Maryland and the photo with the ruler isn’t too accurate. I made a better measurement and it was 1.75 inches and the second one I got was just about 2 inches long. I have never seen these where I live up until this spring. I have seen a total of 3 of them but cannot find a nest or anything directing me to where they may be coming from. Please help. Are they aggressive? Thank you.
Arron Deans

Hi Arron,
The Giant Hornet, Vespa crabro germana, was introduced to America from Europe in the 19th Century. The paper nest is usually hidden in a hollow tree or in a building. They are not aggressive, but will defend their nest. According to the Audubon Guide: “It defends its nest from intruders, but otherwise avoids confrontations when possible.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination