Currently viewing the category: "Wasps and Hornets"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Possible Cuckoo Leafcutter bee?
Geographic location of the bug:  Galveston, Tx
Date: 03/11/2019
Time: 03:45 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello,
I’m just now learning about native bees and am wondering if this bug that I took a picture of in October of 2018 could be a Slosson’s Sand-dwelling Cuckoo Leafcutter Bee. The insect was hanging out in my garden although I can’t remember the name of the plant I saw it on.
Can you help me out and let me know if it is a native bee?
Thanks Chris
How you want your letter signed:  Chris

Potter Wasp

Dear Chris,
This is not a native Bee.  It is a native Potter or Mason Wasp in the subfamily Eumeninae, the Red-marked Pachodynerus,
Pachodynerus erynnis, which we identified on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “Adults are nectar feeders and hunt caterpillars as food for larvae” and “Solitary. A parent wasp builds mud cells or uses empty cells of other mud-building wasp species, provisioning the nest with caterpillars. One larva per cell.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Flies
Geographic location of the bug:  Italy (Rome)
Date: 03/05/2019
Time: 05:42 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi bugman! Upon return from a week out, we found a lot of these ‘flies’ dead around the house, mostly in the bathroom. We had left a basket with walnuts, almonds and hazelnuts in the living room, so that might have attracted them? Not sure.
Anyway, are you able to identify them?
Thanks as always!
How you want your letter signed:  Saverio

Ichneumons, we believe

Dear Saverio,
These are not Flies.  They are Hymenopterans, the insect order that includes Bees and Wasps.  They appear to be parasitoid Ichneumons, a group of solitary wasps that parasitize their prey.  The Ichneumon larva develops inside the body of the prey, feeding on its internal organs until the host dies, at which time the Ichneumon larva pupates, eventually emerging as winged adults.  We suspect your sighting is related to an emergence while you were away.  This occurrence might be related to the basket of nuts, but we are not convinced.  How large were these Ichneumons?  Exact species identification might not be possible.  According to the North American site BugGuide:  “arguably, the largest animal family, with the estimated 60,000 species worldwide (up to 100,000, according to some estimates” and many species are undescribed.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  large bee with a head like a dog
Geographic location of the bug:  east pa.
Date: 03/03/2019
Time: 08:24 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  a few years a go I seen what appeared to be a very large yellow jacket with a head like a dog. it was hovering over a hole and checking me out as much as me it. about 2 to 2 1/2 inches long
How you want your letter signed:  no

Cicada Killer

Despite the poor quality of your image, we are very confident this is a Cicada Killer, a large, female wasp that preys upon Cicadas to feed her brood.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Carpenter bug?
Geographic location of the bug:  Bluff Durban South Africa
Date: 02/20/2019
Time: 06:08 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Is this a carpenter bug? 2nd time submitting first  gave me an error just incase you get twice
How you want your letter signed:  Charlene Boock

Carpenter Bee Robber Fly eats Wasp

Dear Charlene,
Your Food Chain image is magnificent.  Thanks for taking the time to ensure it was properly submitted.  It does appear to be a Carpenter Bee Robber Fly and the prey appears to be a Paper Wasp.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  lage wasp like
Geographic location of the bug:  Suriname, South America
Date: 02/17/2019
Time: 08:53 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi i live in Suriname and never came across this bug before. What is it?
How you want your letter signed:  Marlon

Tarantula Hawk

Dear Marlon,
This appears to be a Tarantula Hawk in the genus
Pepsis, or a closely related genus.  Female Tarantula Hawks prey upon Tarantulas and Trapdoor Spiders, stinging them to paralyze them.  The paralyzed Tarantula is buried after the female Tarantula Hawk lays an egg.  When the egg hatches, the larva feeds on the still living, but paralyzed Tarantula.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What the heck is this?
Geographic location of the bug:  Paralowie, south australia
Date: 01/24/2019
Time: 03:52 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found this bug and did a quick google and it looks like a blue winged wasp which is from America. I’m in Australia! Surely I’m wrong.
How you want your letter signed:  lysieebear

Hairy Flower Wasp

Dear lysieebear,
This is a Hairy Flower Wasp in the family Scoliidae, the same family as the North American Blue Winged Wasp, hence their similarity in appearance.  We located a similar individual on FlickR, but it is only identified to the family level.  Thanks to the Atlas of Living Australia, we believe we have identified your individual as
Laeviscolia frontalis frontalis.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination