Currently viewing the category: "Wasps and Hornets"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  need help identifying this wasp
Geographic location of the bug:  Occoquan NWR, Occoquan Virginia
Date: 09/22/2018
Time: 08:33 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Once more I must ask for you excellent help. I cannot seem to find what species this attractive wasp is in any of my usual resources (including your wonderful site, of course!) Thanks very much in advance.
How you want your letter signed:  Seth

Male Ichneumon: Lymeon orbus possibly

Dear Seth,
This is a parasitoid wasp in the family Ichneumonidae, and according to BugGuide:  “~5,000 described spp. in almost 500 genera in the Nearctic Region, possibly 3,000 more undescribed; arguably, the largest animal family, with the estimated 60,000 species worldwide (up to 100,000, according to some estimates.  Those numbers mean that species identifications can be very challenging. Your individual looks very similar to
Lymeon orbus based on this BugGuide image, but your individual lacks an ovipositor, making it a male, and your individual has a black band on the hind leg lacking in the images we have located of Lymeon orbus.  So, we are certain that this is an Ichneumon Wasp, we are nearly certain it is a male, and beyond that, we need to defer to real experts.  If you find any closer visual matches, please let us know.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Chrysalis perhaps ??
Geographic location of the bug:  Cape Town South Africa
Date: 09/13/2018
Time: 06:46 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi there I found this on our hose keeper.  I have never seen this before and wonder if you could please identify it please ? Thank you sincerely. Cheryl
How you want your letter signed:  Cheryl Combes

What’s That Pupa???

Dear Cheryl,
We are quite certain we have a similar looking hanging pupa in our archives, but we cannot remember its identity this morning.  We are currently very pressed for time, so we are posting your image as unidentified and we hope one of our readers will be able to provide a comment with its identity.

Update:  September 17, 2018:  Thanks to comments from both Cesar Crash and Karl, we are now able to link to another Ichneumon pupa in our archives.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Wasp like insect
Geographic location of the bug:  Skopelos, Greece
Date: 09/12/2018
Time: 07:22 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  On holiday this insect settled on me and was quite happy so folded its wings . Have asked some locals but they don’t know what it is .
How you want your letter signed:  Vivien

Scarab Hunter Wasp

Dear Vivien,
This is a magnificent Scarab Hunter Wasp and thanks to images on pBase and on FlickR, we are confident it is
Scolia hirta.

Scarab Hunter Wasp

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  Niagara Ontario area
Date: 09/04/2018
Time: 11:16 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This caterpillar was hanging on my tomato plant with all these white things on it.
Next morning it was on the ground with most of the white things off of it.
How you want your letter signed:  Pina

Dead Tobacco Hornworm with Braconid Pupae

Dear Pina,
This Tobacco Hornworm or Carolina Sphinx is quite dead, but while it was still alive, it was parasitized by a Braconid Wasp.  When the wasp larvae hatched, they feed on the non-vital tissues of the hornworm until they were ready to leave the host and pupate.  The white things are the Braconid pupae.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Large Black Desert Wasp other than Tarantula Hawk
Geographic location of the bug:  Lost Palms Oasis – Joshua Tree NP
Date: 09/04/2018
Time: 07:03 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  While hiking in J-Tree this week (Early September), I came across a small swarm of large, black wasps around a patch of milkweed. I initially thought they were Tarantula Hawks, but upon closer inspection they were distinctly different from the T-Hawks I’ve seen around Southern California.
Description:
-Black Body approx. 1.5″ in length.
-Rust-Red Abdomen
-Black wings with a subtle blueish sheen.
-Found in a small swarm on Milkweed.
I’ve encountered many different bees and wasps on hikes, but never anything this large that wasn’t a Tarantula Hawk. I couldn’t find anything online that looked like them. Any ideas?
How you want your letter signed:  Ryan Dunn – @CogArtist

Scarab Hunter Wasp

Dear Ryan,
We have identified your beautiful Scarab Hunter Wasp in the family Scoliidae as
Triscolia ardens thanks to images on BugGuide where it states the range is:  “Texas west to California, and south into Mexico.”  According to BugEric:  “Their life cycle can be generalized as follows.  The female wasps fly low over the ground, somehow divining the presence of subterranean scarab beetle grubs.  Once she unearths the grub, she stings it into paralysis.  this allows her to lay a single egg on the grub.  After she accomplishes her mission, she re-buries the grub and flees the scene of the crime (some species have been observed moving the grub deeper into the soil and fashioning an earthen cell around it before depositing an egg and sealing the tunnel).  The beetle grub apparently never recovers from its coma.  The egg of the wasp hatches, and the larva that emerges will feed as an external parasite on its host for about a week or two before spinning a silken cocoon and pupating.  Most North American scoliids overwinter in the pupal stage.”

Scarab Hunter Wasp

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is this blue thin but large looking beetle
Geographic location of the bug:  Santa Clarita CA
Date: 09/03/2018
Time: 12:30 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Can you identify? About 3+ inches long and on the “slender” vs. full beetle shape
How you want your letter signed:  Kat

Steel Blue Cricket Hunter

Dear Kat,
This is not a Beetle.  It is a Steel Blue Cricket Hunter,
Chlorion aerarium, a Wasp in the family Sphecidae.  According to BugGuide:  “Although generally not closely associated with humans, they are found wherever their hosts (Gryllus crickets) are found, which could include close proximity to homes.”  We believe “3+ inches long” is an exaggeration, as BugGuide states:  “~25 mm.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination