Currently viewing the category: "Wasps and Hornets"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is this ????
Geographic location of the bug:  Lehighton Pa
Date: 09/20/2017
Time: 03:57 PM EDT
This flew up to my front porch and was recorded on our security system.
This is a still of it. In the video it flew off
How you want your letter signed:  Jerry

Thread-Waisted Wasp

Dear Jerry,
Your security camera recorded a Thread-Waisted Wasp in the family Sphecidae, and there are several species that use houses as places to construct nests.  Grass Carrying Wasps often nest in the tracks of sash windows and Mud Daubers frequently make mud nests in the eaves of homes.

Thanks so much Daniel !
Been looking forever.
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Please tell me what this is
Geographic location of the bug:  NJ
Date: 09/20/2017
Time: 10:01 PM EDT
Hi,
Can you please tell me what this is, and please tell me it isn’t dangerous?
How you want your letter signed:  J25

Ichneumon, we believe

Dear J25,
We believe this is an Ichneumon, but we would not eliminate the possibility that it might be the other family within Ichneumonoidea, Braconidae.  In a quick and unsuccessful attempt to identify it, we searched BugGuide, but a more thorough search will take much more time than we have right now.  We suspect this Ichneumon is the victim of Unnecessary Carnage.

Thanks! So from what I read about the two possibilities below – not dangerous to humans….
That’s what I really needed to know.
I appreciate your help greatly!
Joseph
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Flying insect
Geographic location of the bug:  Shirley, NY
Date: 09/19/2017
Time: 12:48 AM EDT
Can you identify this bug I found on my flowers?
How you want your letter signed:  Diane L

Thread-Waisted Wasp

Dear Diane,
This is a Thread-Waisted Wasp in the genus
Ammophila.  According to BugGuide:  “Adults visit flowers. Larva feed on caterpillars and sawflies provisioned by the adult female.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  bee or wasp
Geographic location of the bug:  Baltimore Ontario
Date: 09/18/2017
Time: 10:11 PM EDT
I found this little guy walking back and forth on a milkweed plant. I did not realize (until I reviewed my photos) that one of his wings is damaged. I feel sorry for the little guy. I don’t know if this is a bee or wasp. I am leaning towards a bee. Hope you can tell me would be great to know. Thanks
p.s. may have sent this twice computer issues.
How you want your letter signed —
terri martin

Square-Headed Wasp

Dear Terri,
The head-on view you provided made it easy for us to identify your Square-Headed Wasp in the subfamily Crabroninae, and though it is not the same species, it looks very similar to this BugGuide image.  Because of the striping pattern on the abdomen, and the yellow legs and antennae, we suspect your individual is in the genus
Crabro like this BugGuide image.

Square-Headed Wasp

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Velvet Ant
Geographic location of the bug:  San Jacinto Wildlife Area, Riverside, CA
Date: 09/18/2017
Time: 01:20 PM EDT
Found this furry guy (actually a gal as she is wingless) crawling along the ground while I was out taking bird photos this past weekend. Thankfully, I was alerted to her presence before she had a chance to crawl up my leg! After a circle around my chair leg, she moved on. Thanks for helping me identify her and many other species!
How you want your letter signed:  Suzanne

Velvet Ant

Dear Suzanne,
The only Velvet Ant in the genus
Dasymutilla with a velvety black body and a red abdomen reported from California on BugGuide is Dasymutilla magnifica.  Your images are gorgeous.

Velvet Ant

Velvet Ant

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Unique wasp like flying insect
Geographic location of the bug:  Southwest Missouri (Stone Co)
Date: 09/16/2017
Time: 12:39 PM EDT
I saw this unique wasp in our front yard today, one I’d never seen before. I’ve traveled all over the world had have seen some very unique insects and animals but this one is new and I can’t find any pictures of another. It is all black, is multi segmented but the rear segment tuts up like a scorpion rather than the more traditional wasp in this area. It has a very identifiable looking stinger somewhat like a dragonfly and the wings move as a bees with the familiar buzzing sound. Any assistance in identifying it would be great as I’ve never seen one around here. I’ve attached three pictures to help. It was hard to get the pics as it didn’t much care for me getting to close. Thanks.
How you want your letter signed:  JLQD

Mating Thread-Waisted Wasps

Dear JLQD,
This is not a single Sphecid Wasp represented in your images.  It is a mating pair of Thread-Waisted Wasps in the family Sphecidae, and if you look closely, you can see that he has her by the scruff of her neck and that their abdomens, each individually connected to the body by a thin pedicel that gives this family the collective common name of Thread-Waisted Wasps, are conjoined for the transference of spermatozoa.  They look similar to the Blue Mud Wasp that is depicted on BugGuide.

Mating Thread-Waisted Wasps

Mating Thread-Waisted Wasps

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination