Currently viewing the category: "Wasps and Hornets"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Winged insect
Geographic location of the bug:  Nepal (Annapurna region)
Date: 11/05/2019
Time: 08:30 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi
I was on a trek recently (Oct 2019)in the Annapurna region of Nepal. U cane across this winged insect. Would love to know what it is.
Thanks
How you want your letter signed:  Andy

Mammoth Wasp

Dear Andy,
Your image of this amazing insect is awesome.  This is a Mammoth Wasp in the family Scoliidae.  We located this FlickR posting that identifies it as a female
Megascolia azurea and the posting indicates:  “another rare record.”  It is also pictured on ResearchGate and iNaturalist.  Mammoth Wasps prey on the larvae of Scarab Beetles, not to eat, but to provide food for the young.  Ray Cannon’s Nature Notes has a nice posting of an encounter in Thailand.

Hi Daniel,
Thank you so much for your quick response.  Thats amazing. Im so please to have have found out what this insect is. Ive posted it on Instagram, I’ll mention that you helped me i-d it.
Regards
Andy

Hi again Andy,
You got lucky with the “quick response” because Daniel was traveling to Washington DC with a group of award winning Journalism students for five days during which time he didn’t respond to any identification requests.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Digging in the dirt!
Geographic location of the bug:  Southern Nevada
Date: 10/25/2019
Time: 03:08 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  While out to lay pavers in our yard we got to watch a fascinating insect we’d never seen before. We watched for some time as it dug in our soft dirt, buzzing in the hole, moving rocks (sometimes as large as it was!) and at one point it unearthed a grub of sorts! Biting it behind the head it held in… it didn’t appear to sting it, and eventually the grub ceased to move. For an hour we watched as our friend dig holes, and then moved on to another spot. On one hole we watched her start to fill it back in, going in to buzz excitedly, then back to digging. I have a couple of videos too, if you’re interested.
How you want your letter signed:  Sincerely, Kristi Shaffer

Thread-Waisted Wasp with Cutworm Prey

Dear Kristi,
This is a Thread-Waisted Wasp in the family Specidae, and the prey is a Cutworm.  The Wasp will not eat the Caterpillar.  Rather, the female Wasp has paralyzed the Caterpillar which it will bury and the paralyzed Caterpillar will provide food for the developing Wasp larva which will feed on the helpless, but living Caterpillar.  We believe we have correctly identified your Wasp as
Podalonia argentifrons thanks to images posted to BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae are provisioned with caterpillars exclusively from the family Noctuidae.” 

Thread-Waisted Wasp with Cutworm Prey

Thread-Waisted Wasp

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Flying beetle????
Geographic location of the bug:  Cochrane, Alberta Canada
Date: 10/24/2019
Time: 03:56 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Saw this walking along our window (inside)
How you want your letter signed:  Tracey

Ichneumon

Dear Tracey,
Those antennae lead us to believe that this is some species of Ichneumon, a family of parasitoid Wasps whose larvae feed on the internal organs of host-specific Arachnids and immature insects including Caterpillars, Beetle grubs and larvae of wood boring Wasps.  This is an enormous family with according to BugGuide:  “~5,000 described spp. in almost 500 genera in the Nearctic Region, possibly 3,000 more undescribed.”  We doubt it is your species because it is not reported as far north or west, but your individual does resemble 
Limonethe maurator which is pictured on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Big wasp looking thing
Geographic location of the bug:  Frederick County Maryland
Date: 10/06/2019
Time: 04:46 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Saw this big bee/wasp eating a fig in my garden. Much bigger than anything I’ve seen here.
How you want your letter signed:  Garden Guy

European Hornet

Dear Garden Guy,
As you can see by comparing your image to this BugGuide image, you encountered a European Hornet.  According to BugGuide:  “native to Eurasia,
V. c. germana introduced to e. N. Amer. (1800s).”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Shiny Blue/Green fly
Geographic location of the bug:  Raleigh, NC
Date: 09/30/2019
Time: 05:31 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I saw this shiny bug on my neighbors fence and was curious about what it was because I had never seen one around here. The season is fall but it is still pretty hot and humid and I saw the bug in the late afternoon when it was just about to get dark.   Thanks in advance.
How you want your letter signed:  ADG

Cuckoo Wasp

Dear ADG,
This is not a fly.  It is a Cuckoo Wasp in the family Chrysididae.  According to BugGuide:  “The name ‘cuckoo wasp’ refers to the fact that these wasps lay eggs in the nests of unsuspecting hosts.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Is this a spider wasp?
Geographic location of the bug:  Conyers GA
Date: 09/24/2019
Time: 04:07 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Just wondering what type of bug this is. It was dragging a very large spider as it went along.
How you want your letter signed:  Belinda

Spider Wasp and prey

Hi Belinda,
This is definitely a Spider Wasp.  Based on this BugGuide image, it appears to be
Entypus unifasciatus. The prey appears to be a Fishing Spider in the genus Dolomedes, and according to BugGuide:  “Females dig a burrow that ends in a terminal chamber off of the side of a mammal burrow or large crack in the ground. The serrations on the hind tibiae are used to aid the movement of soil out of the burrow entrance. The position in which the egg is laid is unknown. Larvae feed on one large spider and, as in all Pompilids that have one generation per year, overwinter as pupae.”  Most images of this Spider Wasp are with prey that are Wolf Spiders like this BugGuide image, but Fishing Spiders surely constitute “one large spider.”  Perhaps an expert in Spider Wasps will be able to provide comments regarding the prey.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination