Currently viewing the category: "Wasps and Hornets"
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Subject: Sawfly larva identification
Location: East Gippsland, Victoria, Australia
January 14, 2017 11:05 pm
Hello. I am wondering if you can help with the identification of this interesting creature? I think it is a sawfly, family Pergidae, subfamily Perginae (I am happy to be corrected :)), but can’t get any further than that. It was spotted in mid-January, smack-bang in the middle of our Australian summer. It was approximately 2 inches long and moving alone along a fence rail. Nearby trees included two different species of eucalypt and and a she-oak.
Any insights you have would be greatly appreciated. Thanks bug guys! 🙂
Signature: Jacinta Richardson

Spitfire

Dear Jacinta,
This is indeed a Sawfly Larva, and in Australia they are known as Spitfires because of the posture they assume when they are disturbed.  We have a group of similar looking Spitfires in our archives.  Based on information on the Australian Museum site, we believe your identification is correct, but we are unable to provide a conclusive species name at this time.

Spitfire

Hi Daniel
Thank you so much for your response. I will keep researching and if I find any additional information I will let you know. I’ll also check back in case other viewers have further insights.
Thanks again. I love the site!
Jacinta

Spitfire

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Weird bug
Location: San Antonio, Texas
January 12, 2017 2:55 pm
Hello,
I found this slender yellow bug on my way to get the mail today. It has large blue eyes, long antennae, semi-long legs, and a long backside. Can you help me figure out what kind of bug this is? I’ve searched 10 websites and have not been able to figure it out!
Signature: Courtney Richardson

Short Tailed Ichneumon

Dear Courtney,
This is a parasitic Ichneumon in the genus
Ophion, the Short Tailed Ichneumons.  You can compare your individual to this BugGuide image.  According to BugGuide:  “Most all Ophion larva are parasites of caterpillars” and “Adult Ophion species will hunt for their host caterpillar. Usually one egg is laid per host. Caterpillar usually dies during pupal stage though wasp larva remains to pupate itself.”  It should also be noted that Short Tailed Ichneumons are frequently attracted to lights, and though Ichneumons are considered harmless to humans, the Short Tailed Ichneumons are capable of stinging.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Name that bug!
Location: Vancouver WA
January 12, 2017 9:23 pm
This moth (?) evidently came in on the firewood. What kind of bug is this ? I could not find an image on the internet but I don’t know what search words to use.
Signature: Kurious Jo

Introduced Pine Sawfly

Dear Kurious Jo,
Based on this BugGuide image, we feel quite confident this is a male Introduced Pine Sawfly,
Diprion similis.  According to BugGuide:  “adventive from Europe; ne. US (ME-MN to NC-TN) + WA; in Canada, NF-MB & BC.”  We first reported the larvae in Washington in 2008.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: WTB?!
Location: Denver area (larva)
December 12, 2016 10:37 pm
Hello,
I’m trying to positively identify three insects so their Genus species can be part of the file name which will have the Genus species of the flowering plant, too. (You’ll see.)
…The (I think sawfly) larva is on a pincushion cactus blossom and might be two inches long? This is mid-May along the southern edge of the Denver area (Highland Ranch).
I appreciate your even taking the time to consider these.
Best,
Signature: Mark Bennett

Probably Sawfly Larva

Probably Sawfly Larva

Ed Note:  We requested higher resolution images from Mark, and he complied, supplying this additional information.

Hello Daniel,
Here are the three images in their uncropped state. Note, these uncropped images are artwork to me, not science. As such, they are entered in competition at a gallery and could, with luck and the favor of the judges, be selected for display. And, with more luck and perseverance, become salable prints. THUS, please observe my copyright restrictions — you may use the images on your web site and archive, for educational purposes, but they can not be reproduced or shared or in any method used for commercial purposes by you, What’s That Bug?, or any other entity without my express permission. If these terms are acceptable, and accepted, then we’re good. If not, then please delete the attached file(s).
Thanks. I do hope these help the organization.
Mark Bennett Photography
markbennettphoto.com

Escobaria vivipara blossom Symphyta Dolerus sp. sawfly larva Littleton nature walk 20120521 25cv

Escobaria vivipara blossom
Symphyta Dolerus sp. sawfly larva
Littleton nature walk 20120521 25cv

December 18, 2016
Hi again Mark,
We are finally getting around to posting what we agree appears to be a sawfly larva.  We will attempt to contact Eric Eaton to see if he agrees.  We will be postdating this submission to go live to our site while we are away from the office on Christmas Day because of the beautiful colors represented in your artful image.

Sounds like fun! It is a beautiful image, if I say so myself, and is my favorite for inclusion in the upcoming gallery show in Fort Collins, Colorado. The theme is “animalia” and I’m hoping that my “animal,” being present but not the apparent, initial, focus of the photo will catch the jurors’ eyes.
Have a happy holiday,
Mark

Eric Eaton Confirms Sawfly Larva identification.
Yes, the other is a sawfly larva.  Great job!
Eric Eaton
author Kaufman Field Guide to Insects of North America
http://bugeric.blogspot.com/

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: honey wasp
Location: guatemala
December 5, 2016 11:02 am
i would like to know if the wasp on the picture is the honey wasp from mexico, the one that pollinates avocado
Signature: Alejandra Gutiérrez

Honey Wasp

Mexican Honey Wasp

Hi Alejandra,
Our first impression was that this is a Paper Wasp in the subfamily Polistinae, but when we researched the Mexican Honey Wasp,
Brachygastra mellifica, on BugEric, we learned that it is a member of the Paper Wasp subfamily.  Your individual does appear to be a Mexican Honey Wasp.  We have some nice images of the nest of Mexican Honey Wasps in our archives.

Daniel ! Thank you very much for the information you share, it has been very helpful for our research.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Australian wasp
Location: Hornsby NSW
December 3, 2016 1:03 am
My wife captured this shot in our front garden. I wonder if the wasp removed the huntsman spiders legs for transport purposes?
Signature: Australian wasp

Spider Wasp and Huntsman Prey

Spider Wasp and Huntsman Prey

We get several very dramatic submissions from Australia each year of Spider Wasps in the family Pompilidae with Huntsman Spider prey.  The female Spider Wasps stings and paralyzes the Huntsman Spider and then drags it back to her burrow where she lays an egg on the paralyzed Spider.  When the egg hatches, the wasp larva feeds on the living but paralyzed Spider.  It appears that your Spider Wasp has removed the legs of the Huntsman Spider by biting them off in order to make transportation easier.  Based on images posted to the Brisbane Insect site, we believe your Spider Wasp is in the genus Fabriogenia.

Spider Wasp and Huntsman Prey

Spider Wasp and Huntsman Prey

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination