Currently viewing the category: "Wasps and Hornets"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Fly Wasp thing
Geographic location of the bug:  Central Coast California
Date: 07/19/2018
Time: 09:56 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Help ID please
How you want your letter signed:  Rebecca

Sand Wasp

Dear Rebecca,
Our editorial staff is very fond of these Sand Wasps in the genus
Bembix because in addition to being very pretty, according to BugGuide:  “Females provision their nest with flies which the larvae feed on (a single developing larva may eat more than twenty flies)” and “Provisioning is progressive. The females provide a greater number of prey over subsequent days during larval growth. Adults are excellent diggers and can disappear below the surface of loose sand within seconds.”  They are important predators that help reduce the numbers of troublesome flies that are attracted to sandy locations including beaches and campsites.

Sand Wasp

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Unindentified Wasp kills large weaver spider
Geographic location of the bug:  Western Virginia, United States
Date: 07/16/2018
Time: 04:19 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I photographed this bright blue- winged, orange bodied wasp? pulling a large weaver spider across the deck and then backwards (up a 20 foot chimney) until out of sight! Please help identify. We have four children in the home and would like to know if this is an aggressive species with a sting anything like a tarantula hawk?? It was upset at the close up photograph,on the deck, it let go of the spider and flew at me. I ran inside for a minute and it went back to the spider.
How you want your letter signed:  Naomi, Covington Virginia

Spider Wasp with Prey

Dear Naomi,
This Spider Wasp appears to be
Tachypompilus ferrugineus, and it is not an aggressive species.  While many wasps are capable of stinging, solitary species like this Spider Wasp very rarely sting people, and generally that happens only when they are carelessly handled.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Large wasp or hornet
Geographic location of the bug:  Denver Colorado
Date: 07/17/2018
Time: 10:39 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I work for the school district in Denver and this morning I found this girl dead in my parking lot. I’ve never seen one this big. I have more pictures but it won’t let me upload.
How you want your letter signed:  Clifford Leonard

Cicada Killer

Dear Clifford,
This impressive wasp is a Cicada Killer, a non-aggressive species that preys on Cicadas.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Insect
Geographic location of the bug:  Near Tobermory, ON Canada
Date: 07/15/2018
Time: 11:33 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Could you please identify this insect?  This is the first time we’ve seen one.
Thank you.
How you want your letter signed:  ~R

Great Golden Digger Wasp

Dear ~R,
The solitary Great Golden Digger Wasp is not an aggressive species.  The female excavates a burrow that she provisions with Katydids and other Orthopterans to serve as food for her brood. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Wasp?
Geographic location of the bug:  Lincoln Nebraska
Date: 07/13/2018
Time: 11:38 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This buzzed by my sidters house today and I’ve never seen anything like it.  Is it dangerous? They have kids and pets to keep safe.
How you want your letter signed:  Concerned Sister

Spider Wasp

Dear Concerned Sister,
The time for your concern is long passed since it appears the Spider Wasp in this image was already dispatched with some type of spray that formed puddles around its body.  Spider Wasps are not aggressive, though the might sting if carelessly handled.  They are considered beneficial as they help to keep Spider populations in check.  Many insects accidentally enter the home, and the best way to remove them alive is to trap them in a glass, and then slip a postcard between the glass and the surface so the insect can be safely transported outside.  We believe the Spider Wasp in your image is
Tachypompilus ferrugineus based on this BugGuide image.  Here is an image of a Spider Wasp with its prey.  Because we feel this harmless Spider Wasp was dispatched unnecessarily, we are tagging this posting as Unnecessary Carnage.

Thanks for the reply. I’m glad to have the info. The insect was only a bit stunned by the water. Enough to be able to catch and release it. It flew off a few minutes later, according to my sister. But it sure gave her a fright and I couldn’t identify it as anything I’ve ever seen. I’ll pass the info along that she doesn’t need to be afraid if she see another.  She was watering plants and just sprayed it with the water bottle, took pic, and got it out of the house in a Tupperware. Again thanks for the info.
Thanks for that information.  We will post your addition and remove the Unnecessary Carnage tag.
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Scolid wasp?
Geographic location of the bug:  New Jersey  Allaire State park
Date: 07/07/2018
Time: 02:27 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This is a scolid wasp I’m guessing?
How you want your letter signed:  Cindy

Scarab Hunter Wasp

Dear Cindy,
This is indeed a Scarab Hunter Wasp in the family Scoliidae, and we believe, based on BugGuide images, that it is
Campsomeris plumipes.  According to BugGuide:  “Scoliid wasps are parasitic upon larvae of soil-inhabiting scarab beetles.”

Scarab Hunter Wasp

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination