Currently viewing the category: "Wasps and Hornets"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this bug?
Location: Hatfield Forest UK
February 19, 2017 9:56 am
Good evening
We saw these bugs under tree bark of felled tree in Hatfield forest.
Do you know what it is please?
Thank you
Signature: Claire

Ichneumons

Dear Claire,
Though your image lacks critical detail, we are relatively confident these are parasitoid Ichneumon Wasps.  Some species feed on wood boring insects, which may explain their presence under the bark of a felled tree.  This images from Nature Spot of
Achaius oratorius look similar.  Ichneumon stramentor, also on Nature Spot, looks like an even better match.  According to Nature Spot:  ” The larva parasitise the Large Yellow Underwing and Setaceous Hebrew Character moth caterpillars (possibly others), the adult wasp lays its eggs inside the caterpillar, the developing larva then eats it from the inside.”  You can also find some interesting information on Paul’s Back Garden Safari.

Ichneumon

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Flying insect
Location: Franklin, Wv
February 15, 2017 10:26 am
We live in a frame house with redwood siding. It is located in Franklin WV, in the mountains. The inset in the attached photo has shown up during the last two spring seasons. We typically see them between the screen and window in several rooms. It would seem that they must be coming out of the walls somehow, Once there was a swarm of perhaps 100 on the outside of the house under a kitchen window and just above the deck. While is is winter here with many sub-freezing days some of these insect appeared afrer a warm spell when it was 60-65F for a few days.
Signature: Pete Tuckerman

Ichneumons

Dear Pete,
These are members of the order Hymenoptera, the insect group that contains Ants, Bees and Wasps, and our initial impression is that they are most likely Parasitoid Wasps that prey on other insects, possibly an Ichneumon or Brachonid, but we would not rule out that they might be grouped with the Symphyta that includes Sawflies, Horntails and Wood Wasps.  We will continue to research this, and we will contact Eric Eaton for his valuable input.

Eric Eaton provides Family identification.
Daniel:
Those are definitely ichneumon wasps.  May have nothing to do with any host living in the redwood siding.  Many species of ichneumons overwinter as adults, often in large numbers, so this is not an unusual phenomenon.  I suspect the wasps are hibernating in the walls, or nooks and crannies in the siding.  They don’t sting, so no worries there, either.
Eric
author, Kaufman Field Guide to Insects of North America
http://bugeric.blogspot.com/

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bottlebrush Sawfly?
Location: Pakenham Victoria Australia
February 16, 2017 8:08 pm
Hi, just wanting confirmation that this is indeed a Bottlebrush Sawfly. Found it sunning on the edge of a Rose, possibly having a feed of the petal? This is sited in Suburban Pakenham, just out of Melbourne, Australia on a mild Summers day, February 17th 2017.
Signature: Brian C

Bottlebrush Sawfly

Dear Brian C,
This is indeed a Bottlebrush Sawfly,
Pterygophorus cinctus, and since males, one of which is pictured on FlickR, have feathered or pectinate antennae, your individual is a female.

Bottlebrush Sawfly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Any idea what this is?
Location: Mpumalanga, South Africa
February 12, 2017 2:37 pm
This wasp? was rather aggressive.
Signature: Yes

Mammoth Wasp

This is a Mammoth Wasp in the family Scoliidae, and though there are several images posted to iSpot of this distinctive Scoliid, it is only identified to the family level.  Female Mammoth Wasps prey upon the grubs of Scarab Beetles which provide food for her developing young.

Mammoth Wasp

Mammoth Wasp

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Black large flying insect. Blue wings
Location: NSW Australia
February 12, 2017 11:14 pm
Hey, NSW Australia here. Just found this guy near the door. He is larger than a wasp and smaller than a hornet also has the iridescent type blue wings. Just wondering what he might be… haven’t seen this one before
Signature: Regards, andrew

Black Flower Wasp

Dear Andrew,
Though we first located this image on FlickR, we are much more comfortable informing you that this is a Black Flower Wasp,
Austroscolia soror, since the same image is posted to iNaturalist.  The species is also pictured on the Atlas of Living Australia and Encyclopedia of Life.  The Black Flower Wasp is a member of the family Scoliidae, and females withing the family prey on the grubs of Scarab Beetles by laying their eggs, so the beetle grubs provide a live food source for the developing wasp larvae. 

Black Flower Wasp

Black Flower Wasp

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Praying mantis eats giant asain hornet
Location: In Asia.
February 11, 2017 4:06 pm
Last July me and my bros were playing video games and when we came outside to chill out a hornet flew in our home!. Then when we were
Trying to swat the wasp with our ps4 controller he flew in to this manties territory and he captured it with ease. So I took some photos.
Then at the end it was decapation.
Signature: Imb

Mantis eats Asian Hornet

Dear Imb,
We love your images of an Asian Mantis feeding on an Asian Hornet, however we do have a few questions we hope you are able to answer.  Asia is a huge continent.  Are you able to provide a city or country?  You indicated that the hornet flew into your home and that it flew into the mantid’s territory.  Was the mantis a pet?  Thanks for your contribution and your clarification of our questions.

Mantis Eats Asian Hornet

Mantis East Asian Hornet

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination