Currently viewing the category: "Wasps and Hornets"
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Subject: Wasp mimic?
Location: Columbus, OH
March 27, 2017 7:41 am
Hello! This insect landed on me and I cannot for the life of me figure out what it is (my best guess is some sort of sawfly). This picture was taken on March 25th in central Ohio in an urban enviornment–I was actually about to get in my car when it was spotted. The weather was sunny and in the 70’s. I am especially perplexed by the super long antenna and the fact that the colored bands on the abdomen do not wrap all the way around. Thanks!
Signature: Intrigued

Ichneumon we believe

Dear Intrigued,
We are posting prior to doing any research as we are rushed right now, but we believe this is an Ichneumon, a member of a very large family of Parasitic Wasps, that are often recognized by long antennae.  Here is a similar looking Ichneumon in the genus
Banchus from BugGuide.

Ichneumon


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Subject: Caterpillar???
Location: Melbourne, Victoria (Australia)
March 21, 2017 10:36 pm
Me and my sister found this strange caterpillar thing outside. Lately we’ve been having very rainy and humid weather so I don’t know if that caused it’s appearance?
We’d love to know what it is!
Thanks!
Signature: Bridget

Sawfly Larva

Dear Bridget,
This is a Sawfly Larva and it is very easy to confuse a Sawfly Larva for a Caterpillar, but instead of maturing into a butterfly or moth, it will mature into a non-stinging relative of bees and wasps.  We cannot currently access our main “go to” website for Australian identifications, Brisbane Insects, but this does look like a Longtailed Sawfly larva we have in our archives.

Sawfly Larva

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Polistes exclamansSubject: What kind of wasp is this?
Location: Southern California
March 19, 2017 11:09 pm
Dear bugman,
I was recently in Whittier and noticed a wasp feeding off of some old wood bench. Interested, I decided to capture a video of the wasp and realize that it’s the exact kind of wasp I was stung by years ago as a child.
Every time I’ve searched for what kind of wasp this could be I come up with an overwhelming amount of varieties of wasps that leave me with no clear indication on this type of wasp.
I’ve never seen a different type of wasp in my life but just this one. I live in Southern California so it’s definitely a native wasp. Could you tell what kind it is?
Thank you.
Signature: Daniel

Paper Wasp

Dear Daniel,
This is a social Paper Wasp in the genus
Polistes.  Paper Wasps construct nests from chewed wood pulp, and it is safe to surmise that this individual is gathering pulp to add to a nest.  Based on this and other BugGuide images, we feel confident that this is Polistes exclamans,  a species described on BugGuide as having “Dark antennae with orange tips.”

Paper Wasp

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Big black fly with white stripes
Location: South Africa
March 14, 2017 5:40 am
Dear Bugman
I’m from South Africa. I saw this uge fly on my laundry . It seems like it was feeding on a smal bee. Is this a carpenter bee robber fly?
Signature: Yours sincerely, Gerrit

Carpenter Bee Robber Fly eats Wasp

Dear Gerrit,
This is definitely a Carpenter Bee Robber Fly,
Hyperechia marshalli, a species represented on our site in several previous postings.  We verified its identity on iSpot.  These impressive aerial predators have a particular fondness for preying on large, stinging insects.  Your individual appears to be eating a Paper Wasp.  The Carpenter Bee Robber Fly is also pictured on iNaturalist.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Wasp?
Location: Rockmart, Ga.
March 9, 2017 3:30 am
Can’t figure out what this is???
Signature: Mary

Webspinning or Leafrolling Sawfly

Dear Mary,
We believe we have correctly identified your Webspinning or Leafrolling Sawfly as
Acantholyda maculiventris or a closely related species based on this BugGuide image.  BugGuide has reports from Mississippi and North Carolina, so your location seems to be within the range of the species.  The species is also pictured on the Farmapest site, though we do not understand what has been written about it.  You need to scroll down to page to view the image.  Sawflies are non-stinging relatives of bees and wasps.

Webspinning or Leafrolling Sawfly

Thank you guys soooo……. much😀😀😀

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Red Wasp in Florida
Location: St Petersburg, Florida
March 6, 2017 12:26 pm
Hi,
A friend took the attached picture near St. Petersburg, Florida. It looks like a wasp, and it’s certainly red. I know, though, that some bees look a lot like wasps.
Can you please identify the species for us? We’re both curious about it.
Thanks much.
Signature: Jay Bryant

Potter Wasp

Dear Jay,
Because of the shape and color of the wings and the way they are held, we believe this is a Paper Wasp in the genus
Polistes, but we cannot locate any images on BugGuide that match the coloration on your individual.  Are there any images showing the face of this Wasp?

Potter Wasp

Hi, Daniel,
I asked my friend, Lesley Wilson, whom I have Cc’d on this message, if she had other images, and she did. I have attached all four (including a larger version of the original) as a zip file.
You mentioned that you didn’t have photos of a member of the species with this coloration. Lesley said she’d be fine with your using her images on your site, though she’d like to put her name on them first.
Thanks.
Jay Bryant

Thanks Jay,
These new images are a big help, though we still cannot provide you with a definite species identification.  Also thank Lesley Wilson for her contribution.  This is a Mason Wasp or Potter Wasp in the Subfamily Eumeninae, and the closest matches we can locate on BugGuide are
Delta rendalli which is pictured on BugGuide and Zeta argillaceum which is also pictured on BugGuide.  Both species are found in Florida.

Potter Wasp

Update from the Photographer
Good afternoon, Daniel Marlos. My friend Jay Bryant submitted some of my photos of a wasp to you for identification. I’m attaching accredited copies of photos of the wasp for your website use, should you so desire. I am happy to share my photos as long as they are appropriately accredited.
If you have any questions, please feel free to contact me.
Lesley Wilson

Hi Lesley,
When Jay submitted the original request, he indicated a friend took them.  Then he provided additional images at our request that led to us identifying this Mason or Potter Wasp. You are credited in the text of the posting, however I will need to remove all the images and repost them if you want your credit embedded in the images.  Please advise.
Daniel

Potter Wasp

Ed. Note:  Our staff has replaced the original images with the new images supplied by Lesley Wilson, the photographer.  Visit her FlickR site for more of Lesley’s work.

Potter Wasp

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination