Currently viewing the category: "Wasps and Hornets"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Unknown Moth Chrysalis?
Geographic location of the bug:  Northern VA
Date: 05/18/2019
Time: 03:06 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello, I was walking today (May 18) and found this unusual growth on a small tree sapling off of the neighborhood trail. I’ve searched but have only found one image even close and it was a silk moth chrysalis.
How you want your letter signed:  N. Celata

Oak Apple Gall

Dear N. Celata,
Your sapling appears to be a young Oak and this is a Gall, a growth that appears on plants and is often caused by an insect.  Oaks are hosts to many different Gall Wasps that produce Galls.  Based on images posted to Discover Life, we believe this is an Oak Apple Gall,
Amphibolips confluenta.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Spider wasp and prey
Geographic location of the bug:  Charleston, Illinois
Date: 05/15/2019
Time: 01:11 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Saw you were looking for a image of this spider and its prey. Just a cell phone picture but shows key features.
How you want your letter signed:  Christopher S

Spider Wasp and Wolf Spider Prey

Dear Christopher,
Thanks so much for submitting your awesome image of a Spider Wasp,
Entypus unifasciatus, and its Wolf Spider prey.  The Wolf Spider will not be eaten by the Spider Wasp.  She feeds on nectar from flowers, and the paralyzed Wolf Spider will provide fresh food for a larval Spider Wasp which will eat its paralyzed meal alive.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  European hornet ?
Geographic location of the bug:  north Georgia
Date: 05/02/2019
Time: 06:13 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman :  Found this hornets’ nest at the base of a tree in north Georgia.  The guards at the entrance were all fanning the nest.  I think this is the European hornet but would like confirmation.  Sorry the photos are blurry – actually they are freeze frames from a long video clip.  FWIW I am a Patreon donor to WTB!
How you want your letter signed:  Bruce Carlson

European Hornets

Hi Bruce,
Thanks for your patronage.  We apologize for the delay, but Daniel is currently in Ohio for Mother’s Day and the internet here is woefully slow.  These are definitely European Hornets. At first we were not convinced this is a nest because European Hornets and many other Wasps will feed on sap that is oozing from trees.  According to BugGuide:  “Paper nest is built in hollow trees, or in human structures such as attics” so we also concur that this is a nest.

European Hornets

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Any ideas
Geographic location of the bug:  Western Washington
Date: 05/07/2019
Time: 07:49 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This bug was located by my daughter at her grandparents. I’ve never seen it and neither have they and they’ve lived there for 18 plus years. We became very curious to what it may be but can’t find it through our research.
How you want your letter signed:  Curious Father

Elm Sawfly

Dear Curious Father,
This is an Elm Sawfly, a non-stinging member of the Order Hymenoptera, a group that includes Bees and Wasps.  According to the University of Wisconsin-Madison Master Gardener Program:  “The adults of sawflies tend to be inconspicuous, and look somewhat like wasps, but do not sting. They feed on pollen and nectar, so may be seen on flowers as well as their larval host plants. They are not very active, making only short flights in sunny weather, and resting on leaves otherwise. Many sawfly species are parthenogenetic; since they do not need to mate to reproduce, males are very rare even in species where males are known to occur.”

Thank you so much for the reply. My daughter will be excited to learn what she found. You rock.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Bug identification
Geographic location of the bug:  Scottsdale Arizona
Date: 04/15/2019
Time: 02:32 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello,
We were on a Hummer excursion near Scottsdale on an Indian reservation and I saw this guy crossing one of the paths. The guide said it was a baby tarantula but I’m doubtful because of the legs. I’m hoping you can help identify it.
Thank you,
How you want your letter signed:  Traci Curtis

Velvet Ant

Dear Traci,
This is a Velvet Ant, a flightless, solitary, female Wasp that is reported to have a very painful sting.  This is most likely a member of the genus
Dasymutilla, which is well represented on BugGuide, and it might be the Magnificent Velvet Ant, Dasymutilla magnifica, which is pictured on the Arizona Naturalist site where it states:  “The sting is reportedly very painful, but it’s function is to disarm other stinging insects such as bees. Velvet ants enter the nests of other wasps/bees, sting the owner into submission, and lay their own egg in the owner’s larder. Later the developing velvet ant grub will consume the bee grub. Some other velvet ants are parasites of grasshopper eggs in the soil.”

Thank you for the information and links. One of the sites said they are hard to photograph because they don’t stay on the trails long. This one was a friendly little ant and I’m happy we didn’t decide to pick it up!
Have a great day!
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Whats this bug?
Geographic location of the bug:  Elgin,TX
Date: 03/25/2019
Time: 02:10 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This evening for the first time I got stung by what at least I thought was harmless “Mosquito Hawk”.My skin is still very hot,itchy,and burning 2 hours later.One difference I noticed from posted photo’s is much longer antenae that curl on the ends. (Elgin Texas)
How you want your letter signed:  M.McCartney

Ichneumon

Dear M.McCartney,
We get numerous emails and comments from folks claiming to have been stung by a Crane Fly, AKA Mosquito Hawk, and despite our repeated responses that Crane Flies do not bite nor sting, a stand supported by Crane Fly expert Chen Young, folks still claim the Crane Fly to be the culprit.  Your image is of an Ichneumon, a parasitoid wasp.  Most Ichneumons are harmless to people, but one genus,
Ophion, is capable of stinging.  Your Ichneumon appears to belong to that genus.

Thank You So Much For Replying, that looks like what got me.
I will now be vigilant for these stinging Wasps lurking amongst the swarms of harmless Crane Flies !
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination