Currently viewing the category: "Walkingsticks"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Musk-mare
Here’s a photo of a musk-mare – didn’t know what it was ‘till I found your website. Thought you’d like a decent photo of the pair. Also, you helped me identify a mole cricket today. Strangest thing I’ve seen in a while. Thanks.
Gene Browning
Melbourne FL

Hi Gene,
Your photo of Mating Two-Lined Walkingsticks, or Muskmares, is great. Stay clear of the noxious fluid they are capable of spraying into your eyes.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Hi,
Here is another Panamanian bug. This cute walking stick climbed up my arm and into my hair. Something about my hair made him open his wings. I didn’t know walkingsticks have wings. Here are some pictures to add to your collection.
Lisa

Hi Again Lisa,
We were trying to catch up with some old mail and came across your letter. Many tropical Walkingsticks have wings and are capable of flight, though the U.S. species lack wings.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Hi!
I am living in the country of Panama and work in a limestone quarry located inside some pretty dense rain forest. I see all kinds of weird unidentifiable (By me anyways!) bugs and had nobody to ask about them. I don’t like to kill them; only photograph them. I have several different bugs collected. Some very, very strange ones too. I would love to know more about them. Here are some pictures of one of them. I love the way this one "hides". Pretty impressive. It was taken in March of 2004. I have others, but I think I can only fit one at a time.
Thank you,
Lisa Palm
Buena Vista, Colon, Panama
PS. Oh yeah… I would love to know if it is poisonous

Hi Again Lisa,
We are loving all the exotica you are sending from Panama. We went back to your original letter on this one. That letter was waiting for our limited allotment of attention as we do not have a definitive answer for you. We suspect this is some species of Phasmid, the order that contains Walkingstick and Timemas. Some Walkingsticks, including the Musk Mare from the American South, can spray a noxious fluid that will temporarily irritate the eyes. We would like Eric Eaton to take a look at this critter because we always turn to him when we are in doubt.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Animal in Madagaskar
Hello,
I’m asking from Germany for Identification of this animal I found in the rainforest near Andasibe / Perinet in Madagaskar. Thank you very much.
Yours
Christian

Hi Christian,
The Walkingstick you photographed in Madagascar is missing a front leg.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Walkingstick Photo
We found this fascinating Walkingstick in the parking lot at St Andrews State Park, located in Panama City, Florida. My mother picked it up and moved it to the brush so it wouldn’t get run over. I came upon your website while trying to identify the bug – and now we know about it defense mechanism. Fortunately, this one didn’t feel threatened enough to spray us. Now that we know, we’ll certainly be more careful handling them in the future. Anyhow, I just wanted to share this picture with you and let you know how helpful your website is.
Thank you!
Suzanna Giddens

Hi Suzanna,
WE are very happy to find out the Muskmare didn’t spray your mother in the eye.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

MYSTERY DESERT INSECT
Mystery Insect
I found this insect while camping in the desert in southeastern California. Its colored exactly like the rock formations in that area. I caught it on a fence post in April of 2004 but it died on the way home. I’ve been collecting insects since I was 5 but I can’t figure out what this is. I thought it might be an immature cricket (without jumping legs!?). The specimen in the pic is 1/2 an inch long and had antennae that were about as long as the body and similar to a cricket’s. Please help. Thanx for any info.
Myke Miazio
San Diego,CA

Hi Myke,
This is a relative of Walkingsticks known as a Timema. They are found in the west and feed on oaks, ceanothus and firs.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination