Currently viewing the category: "Walkingsticks"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Never seen this bug before
Location: Shepherd tx
June 22, 2017 4:38 am
I need to know what this is and if it’s dangerous
Signature: I don’t know

Mating Two Striped Walkingsticks

These are mating Two Striped Walkingsticks, commonly called Muskmares, though theoretically only the larger female would be a Muskmare, while the smaller male is her diminutive stallion.  Caution should be exercised when approaching Two Striped Walkingsticks, because according to BugGuide:  “Members of this genus can deliver a chemical spray to the eyes that can cause corneal damage.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Request for Identification of Mystery Australian Stick insect
Location: Mount Gambier, South Australia, Australia
March 3, 2017 1:46 am
Hello!
I found recently found some mystery phasmids while out doing conservation and land management work, and i would love to try and get a positive ID on them. Ive tried finding information on the internet about the individuals i found, but most of the information is about the larger ‘pet’ Australian species.
The green one was the easiest to photograph, as it stayed still. The smaller brown individuals (who are a different gender judging by genitalia) were much more lively.
The images i included show the green individual, which has a bulkier body, and two thin protrusions at the end. On all the individuals i found, there was no evidence or wings or wing buds (found in nymph stages of other stick insects) so i assume they may be flightless.
With front limbs straight out, the green one was about 11-12cm long total, with about 7cm of that being from head to end of abdomen.
I found these guys on a native grass possibly called “Tussock Grass” (Poa sieberiana or Poa labillardieri) – within close vivacity to Ficinia nodosa (Knotted Club Rush). So they were close to the ground. Others i were working with noticed them on their clothing as we worked in the area, and we assumed they climbed onto us from the grass. Acacia and Shea-oak were also very close by.
Some were observed mating but i didn’t get a chance to see the size of those adults.
I hope all the information i provided helps in identification. For now i will keep them in captivity until tomorrow, where i will probably release them back to the tussock grasses where i found them
I cant seem to attach all the images, so if you need additional images i have them (images of abdomen, close ups of heads, genetalia etc)
Signature: Liam

Sydney Stick Insect

Dear Liam,
We are posting your image in the hopes that one of our readers might be able to assist with a species identification of this Phasmid.  You can try attaching additional images and responding to us.

Here are some other images, but i was already given a positive ID by an australian stick insect breeder. The phasmid is the “Sydney stick insect” Candovia peridromes.

Sydney Stick Insect

Sydney Stick Insect

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Ocala bug
Location: Ocala Florida
November 20, 2016 6:57 pm
Never seen one anywhere but Ocala National Forest
Signature: Scotty Cooke

Mating Striped Walkingsticks

Mating Striped Walkingsticks

Dear Scotty,
Your image depicts a gorgeous pair of Southern Striped Walkingsticks,
Anisomorpha buprestoides, but their starkly contrasting black and white coloration is unusual and we did find a similarly colored pair on BugGuide.  According to the information page on BugGuide:  “Three color forms, two of them only found in limited areas:  White form, only found around Ocala National Forest;  Orange form, only found around Archbold Biological Station;  Brown form, widely distributed and commonly found throughout the entire range of the species.”  Walkingsticks in the genus Anisomorpha are frequently found mating and are sometimes called Muskmares, and they should be handled with extreme caution or even better not at all, because according to BugGuide:  “Members of this genus can deliver a chemical spray to the eyes that can cause corneal damage.” 

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Subject: Two insects
Location: Ravenel, SC
October 31, 2016 9:51 am
My husband found these guys in there work shop and was curious what they are.
Signature: Melissa

Two-Striped Walkingsticks Mating

Two-Striped Walkingsticks Mating

Dear Melissa,
These are mating Two-Striped Walkingsticks in the genus
Anisomorpha and they should be handled with caution because according to BugGuide:  “Members of this genus can deliver a chemical spray to the eyes that can cause corneal damage.”  Mating pairs are sometimes called Muskmares, though theoretically, only the female is a Muskmare.  You might enjoy this image of a herd of mating Muskmares from our archives.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Weird stick looking bug/spider?
Location: Daniekskuil, Northern Cape
October 26, 2016 11:49 pm
Found the weird looking spider/bug looking thing early morning on my stoep.
Signature: I dont know? Advise?

Stick Insect

Stick Insect

There is not much critical detail in your image, but this appears to be a Walkingstick or Stick Insect in the order Phasmida.  You can browse iSpot for members of the order.

Good day,
Please see attached close up photos I took this morning, if it should help.
Kind regards,
Stephanie

Stick Bug or True Bug???

Stick Bug or True Bug???

Thanks for sending in more images Stephanie.  We still believe this is a Phasmid, but we would not rule out that it might be a True Bug like a Thread-Legged Bug or Water Scorpion.

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Subject: large Walking Stick insect “dropped in”
Location: Snicker’s Gap, Loudon County, Virginia
September 22, 2016 5:32 pm
Hi Daniel – While at a Hawk Watch, I had this Stick insect drop from a tree right in front of me today. I coaxed it onto an oak leaf, to move it out of the gravel parking lot, and got this photo. I estimate that it was about 5 – 6 inches in length. If relevant, the elevation of Snicker’s Gap is around 1,000 feet. I wonder if you can identify the species. Thanks!
Signature: Seth

Snicker’s Gap, Loudon, VA

Northern Walkingstick

Dear Seth,
We believe this is a female Northern Walkingstick,
Diapheromera femorata, and you can compare your individual to this BugGuide image.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination