Currently viewing the category: "Walkingsticks"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Weird Walking Stick Scorpion
Geographic location of the bug:  Guatemala City, Guatemala Zone 15
Date: 09/17/2017
Time: 11:03 AM EDT
I have seen 3 of these in my garage lately. I would like to know what it is and if it is dangerous for my toddlers.
How you want your letter signed:  Thank you so much!

Walkingstick

We found what appears to be the same species of Walkingstick on Project Noah where it is identified as “Autolyca elena Gorochov & Berezin, 2008″ referred to as a Scorpion mimic:  “This is a walking stick which is imitating a scorpion. It is shiny black and carries the tail end curled up over the abdomen. It is remarkably like a scorpion in general appearance and behavior. However, it is phytophagous and not a predator nor can it sting. It also has extremely long antennae which are banded orange and black and of course, only 3 pair of legs. This is a male.”  There are also images on iNaturalist.  Some Stick Insects can spray chemical defenses, but we do not know if this is one of those species.

Thank you so much!  I am a bit more at ease with the fact that it does not sting!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is this?
Geographic location of the bug:  Placencia, Belize
Date: 09/09/2017
Time: 01:07 AM EDT
This is big, what is it?
How you want your letter signed:  AP

Stick Insect

Dear AP,
This is a Katydid, and it appears to be a species that mimics bark to help camouflage it from its enemies.  It resembles this Katydid from Panama that Katydid expert Piotr Naskrecki identified as
Acanthodis curvidens.  There is an image on Visuals Unlimited that is identified as that species as well.  We will attempt to contact Piotr Naskrecki for verification.

Piotr Naskrecki provides a correction.
Hi Daniel,
Not only is this not the same species, it is not even the same order. This animal is a phasmid (stick insect) Prisopus sp. (Phasmida: Pseudophasmatidae). These animals are chemically protected and produce a strong, repellant smell when disturbed.
Cheers,
Piotr

Hello Daniel,
Still a little confused, The Prisopus actually only had 2 legs on each side while ours has 3, does that make a difference? Please advise.
Thank you,
Anthony

All insects have six legs, but some insects position themselves in such a way as to conceal body parts, including legs.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s this bug?
Location: Coastal South Carolina, inland about 8 miles
August 17, 2017 6:58 pm
I have seen these around the outside of my home always during the hot summer months, and usually at night. It appears to carry offspring on its back. It has long antennas on the front. Please tell me what this bug is.
Signature: Kristi Baker

Mating Muskmares

Dear Kristi,
What you have mistaken for an offspring is actually a mate.  These are Striped Walkingsticks in the genus
Anisomorpha, sometimes called Muskmares because they are frequently found mating, and the larger female Muskmare is able to carry her diminutive mate on her back.  According to BugGuide:  “Members of this genus can deliver a chemical spray to the eyes that can cause corneal damage.” 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Never seen this bug before
Location: Shepherd tx
June 22, 2017 4:38 am
I need to know what this is and if it’s dangerous
Signature: I don’t know

Mating Two Striped Walkingsticks

These are mating Two Striped Walkingsticks, commonly called Muskmares, though theoretically only the larger female would be a Muskmare, while the smaller male is her diminutive stallion.  Caution should be exercised when approaching Two Striped Walkingsticks, because according to BugGuide:  “Members of this genus can deliver a chemical spray to the eyes that can cause corneal damage.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Request for Identification of Mystery Australian Stick insect
Location: Mount Gambier, South Australia, Australia
March 3, 2017 1:46 am
Hello!
I found recently found some mystery phasmids while out doing conservation and land management work, and i would love to try and get a positive ID on them. Ive tried finding information on the internet about the individuals i found, but most of the information is about the larger ‘pet’ Australian species.
The green one was the easiest to photograph, as it stayed still. The smaller brown individuals (who are a different gender judging by genitalia) were much more lively.
The images i included show the green individual, which has a bulkier body, and two thin protrusions at the end. On all the individuals i found, there was no evidence or wings or wing buds (found in nymph stages of other stick insects) so i assume they may be flightless.
With front limbs straight out, the green one was about 11-12cm long total, with about 7cm of that being from head to end of abdomen.
I found these guys on a native grass possibly called “Tussock Grass” (Poa sieberiana or Poa labillardieri) – within close vivacity to Ficinia nodosa (Knotted Club Rush). So they were close to the ground. Others i were working with noticed them on their clothing as we worked in the area, and we assumed they climbed onto us from the grass. Acacia and Shea-oak were also very close by.
Some were observed mating but i didn’t get a chance to see the size of those adults.
I hope all the information i provided helps in identification. For now i will keep them in captivity until tomorrow, where i will probably release them back to the tussock grasses where i found them
I cant seem to attach all the images, so if you need additional images i have them (images of abdomen, close ups of heads, genetalia etc)
Signature: Liam

Sydney Stick Insect

Dear Liam,
We are posting your image in the hopes that one of our readers might be able to assist with a species identification of this Phasmid.  You can try attaching additional images and responding to us.

Here are some other images, but i was already given a positive ID by an australian stick insect breeder. The phasmid is the “Sydney stick insect” Candovia peridromes.

Sydney Stick Insect

Sydney Stick Insect

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Ocala bug
Location: Ocala Florida
November 20, 2016 6:57 pm
Never seen one anywhere but Ocala National Forest
Signature: Scotty Cooke

Mating Striped Walkingsticks

Mating Striped Walkingsticks

Dear Scotty,
Your image depicts a gorgeous pair of Southern Striped Walkingsticks,
Anisomorpha buprestoides, but their starkly contrasting black and white coloration is unusual and we did find a similarly colored pair on BugGuide.  According to the information page on BugGuide:  “Three color forms, two of them only found in limited areas:  White form, only found around Ocala National Forest;  Orange form, only found around Archbold Biological Station;  Brown form, widely distributed and commonly found throughout the entire range of the species.”  Walkingsticks in the genus Anisomorpha are frequently found mating and are sometimes called Muskmares, and they should be handled with extreme caution or even better not at all, because according to BugGuide:  “Members of this genus can deliver a chemical spray to the eyes that can cause corneal damage.” 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination