Currently viewing the category: "Walkingsticks"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  whats the name of this bug
Geographic location of the bug:  amsterdam, netherlands
Date: 04/22/2019
Time: 07:25 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  the bug was found in the Hortus Botanicus Leiden in the Netherlands
it was walking on an ant plant
How you want your letter signed:  Rick

Stick Insect

Dear Rick,
At first we were quite puzzled by your image, and then it dawned upon us that this must be an immature Stick Insect in the Order Phasmida.  Beyond that, we are at a bit of a loss.  We are uncertain of the species or even if it is a native or introduced species for you, though we are leaning toward the latter.  Since you discovered this little critter in a botanical garden, the flora is likely from many locations on the planet, and if there is climate control, that flora might even include jungle species from the tropics.  When importing plants, it is quite easy to accidentally introduce insects, especially immature individuals or eggs.  Perhaps one of our readers who knows more about Phasmids will write in with a more specific identification.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What’s that bug
Geographic location of the bug:  Burwood Chrisfchurch5
Date: 03/31/2019
Time: 05:28 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Found resting on wall of our house.
How you want your letter signed:  BRM

Stick Insect

Dear BRM,
This is a Stick Insect in the order Phasmatodea.  According to Manaaki Whenua Landcare Research:  “The New Zealand stick insect fauna contains 21 valid species in eight genera, but much taxonomic work remains to be done. Recent fieldwork and data analyses have revealed the presence of undescribed species, particularly in the South Island. Furthermore, several described species are of dubious validity. Current taxonomic research includes a large amount of collecting throughout New Zealand and all major offshore islands. Generic and species boundaries are being determined using both morphological and molecular genetic characters.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Big stick insect!
Geographic location of the bug:  Valdora QLD Australia
Date: 04/01/2019
Time: 08:40 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Can you please tell me what this massive insect is? At a guess it’s about 250mm long.
How you want your letter signed:  Eric

Female Titan Stick Insect

Dear Eric,
Size alone is not a diagnostic feature for Stick Insects in Australia, which seems to be the home of several of the largest Stick Insects in the world.  Do you by chance have a dorsal view that shows the head?  That would be helpful.  The Brisbane Insect site has images of some large Stick Insects from Australia.  We will post your images as Unidentified and perhaps one of our readers more familiar with Australian fauna will provide a species identification.

Female Titan Stick Insect

Update:  Comment from Michael Connors:
An adult female Titan Stick Insect (Acrophylla titan) – the long wavy cerci and the dark spots on the underside are diagnostic features.

ED. Note:  According to the Brisbane Insect site:  “Titan Stick Insects are giant insect, they are the longest insect in Australia. The female adult body length is about 230mm.”

Hi Daniel,
Thanks heaps for taking the time to look it up and get back to me! You guys are awesome:)
Cheers,
Eric

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Stick bug love?
Geographic location of the bug:  Gulfshores, Alabama
Date: 08/12/2018
Time: 01:22 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Just sharing some bug loving.
How you want your letter signed:  Lower Alabama Bug guy

Mating Muskmares

Dear Lower Alabama Bug guy,
These are Two-Striped Walkingsticks in the genus
Anisomorpha, commonly called Muskmares because the much smaller male rides the larger female during mating, as your image illustrates, and because, according to BugGuide:  “Members of this genus can deliver a chemical spray to the eyes that can cause corneal damage.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Mantid for identification
Geographic location of the bug:  near Kaeng Krachan NP, Thailand
Date: 04/17/2018
Time: 03:06 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Any help with the identification of this Mantid would be much appreciated.
How you want your letter signed:  Many thanks Steve

Leaf Insect

Dear Steve,
This is not a Mantid.  It is a Leaf Insect in the order Phasmida, and we have some amazing images in our archive where a Leaf Insect is being eaten by a Mantid in Thailand.  Our current research found matching images on Dreamtime and Shutterstock but there is no species name.  The website we used in our initial identification of the species is no longer active, but we did find images of
Phyllium siccifolium on BugWorld and on Our Breathing Planet where it states:  “Phyllium Siccifolium is a type of leaf insect which has no acknowledged common name. It was, in fact, the first species of leaf insect recognized. Like all species of this type of insect, they remain masters of camouflage. They are primarily active at either dusk or night. Phyllium Siccifolium is entirely herbivorous by nature.” 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  White Walking Stick
Geographic location of the bug:  Costa Rica
Date: 01/22/2018
Time: 10:20 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I spotted this very small (only a few cm) walking stick like insect at Rainmaker Conservatory outside of Quepos in Costa Rica. It looked more like the small white roots around where it was spotted. I was only able to find stock photos of it on google under “albino walking stick,” but with no ID.  Any help would be wonderful.
How you want your letter signed:  Clayton M

Walkingstick

Dear Clayton,
This appears to be an immature individual, which might make it difficult to identify.  Additionally, newly molted insects are often white or light in color, and the darken when their exoskeleton hardens, like this freshly molted Earwig or this newly molted Brown Marmorated Stink Bug.

Thanks for your reply!  I also posted the picture on Reddit, and someone said it might be a very immature Moss Mimic Stick which makes a lot of sense based on the head, antennae, and how it holds its abdomen.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination