Currently viewing the category: "Raspy Crickets"
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Subject: what is this?!
Location: South Australia
March 12, 2015 10:55 pm
I found this massive bug in my horses water trough today, do you have any idea what it is? I’ve never seen it before and it’s kind of scary!
Signature: Thanks!

Probably Raspy Cricket

Probably Raspy Cricket

We believe this is a Raspy Cricket in the family Gryllacrididae and they are reported to deliver a painful bite, though what you might have mistaken for a stinger is actually an ovipositor used to lay eggs.  More images can be found on the Brisbane Insect website.

Probably Raspy Cricket

Probably Raspy Cricket

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Subject: Strange bug
Location: Pyramid hill, Victoria, 3575, Australia
February 28, 2015 7:34 am
I have never seen anything like it! This bug looks like a bug cream coloured wasp! Please help me identify it… By the way i am in Australia, Victoria, Pyramid hill.
Signature: Abi

Katydid

Raspy Cricket

Dear Abi,
This is a harmless female Katydid, and we suspect you mistook her for a wasp because of the stinger-like ovipositor which is used to deposit eggs.  We are not certain of the species, but you may be able to identify it on the Brisbane Insect website.

Update:  October 31, 2016
We just received a comment that this is a Raspy Cricket.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this?
Location: Gaitlinburg TN USA
May 10, 2014 3:21 pm
Hi , my name is Justin I collect insects as a hobby and have taken a couple entomology classes, but I can’t ID this insect. It looks like some sort of a longhorn beetle . But I believe this is husk or shell. Is this possibly a nymph stage of an insect? This was found in November 2013 near Gaitlinburg TN USA.
Signature: Justin. T

Unknown Katydid Nymph

Fungus Infected female Carolina Leaf Roller

Hi Justin,
WE are having trouble providing you with a definitive identification, but we can tell you this is not a Longhorn Beetle.  This is an Orthopteran in the suborder Ensifera, the Longhorned Orthoptera.  Furthermore, we believe it is an immature Katydid in the family Tettigoniidae, and the presence of an ovipositor indicates it is a female.  This does not appear to be a shed exoskeleton, as there is no evidence of a splitting along the dorsal surface which is where the newly metamorphosed insect would emerge from a cast-off exuvia.  Your image is not as sharp as we would like, and we are uncertain if those are spines on the body, or perhaps the remnants of a fungal infection.  There are several examples on the Field Biology in Southeastern Ohio page of Carolina Leaf Rollers infected with
 Cordyceps fungus that look very similar to your image, and we believe that might be an accurate identification.  The description on the site states:  “Another body invading fungus is Cordyceps. They are known to attack at least a dozen different orders of insects. This is a Carolina Leafroller, Camptonotus carolinensis, a katydid relative.  The dark spot at the base of the abdomen, and the long ovipositor verify this as a female leafroller. Cordyceps fungi may be more familiar to some with regards to ants. This is the same genus that affects the brains of certain ants, turning them into zombies. They climb to high points on vegetation, then the fungal spores spring out of their head. Infected ants are recognized by the colony, and individuals are removed so they won’t cause the entire population to die.”  So, after our research, we are concluding that this is a female Carolina Leaf Roller, a Raspy Cricket, that has been infected by Cordyceps fungus.

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Subject: IS THIS GRASSHOPPER /WASP?
Location: RIVERLAND. SOUTH AUSTRALIA.
January 16, 2013 9:32 am
CAN YOU PLEASE IDENTIFY THIS BUG FOR ME AND IS THERE LIKELY TO BE MORE OF THEM HERE. THANKYOU.
Signature: GRANNY

Raspy Cricket

Dear GRANNY,
You really don’t need to worry much about this Raspy Cricket in the family Gryllacrididae and likely in the genus
Ametrus.  We identified it from our own archives thanks to the input of a noted Katydid expert, Piotr Naskrecki.  What appears to be a stinger is actually the females ovipositor, an organ used in the laying of eggs.

THANKYOU DANIEL FOR YOUR FAST REPLY…I AM VISION IMPAIRED AND ACTUALLY THOUGHT IT WAS A HUGE SPIDER THAT LANDED ON MY SHOULDER..I SCREAMED SO FRIENDS CAME RUNNING AND FOUND THE INSECT..IT WAS THEY WHO NEEDED IT IDENTIFIED AND TY SOO MUCH…GOOD LUCK WITH YOUR GREAT WORK..GRANNY..

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Cricket from India
Location: Agumbe, Karnataka, India
April 10, 2012 7:26 pm
This photo of an unidentified cricket was taken in January by a trip mate on a recent adventure in India. The antennas must have been near a foot long! She was on a fence post with her ovipositor out, so we tried not to disturb her too much. Any ID would be greatly appreciated!
Signature: Brian

Raspy Cricket

Dear Brian,
We are not certain if this Longhorned Orthopteran is a Katydid or a Raspy Cricket, which is what we are leaning towards.  We will contact Katydid expert Piotr Naskrecki to get his input.

Hi Daniel,
You are correct, this is a raspy cricket. The easiest way to tell them apart is to look at the front tibia: a katydid will have tympanum (or a least a tympanal slit) below the knee, raspy crickets don’t have them. Unfortunately, I will not be able to tell you more about this Indian species other than that it is possibly (with a big question mark) a member of the genus Pardogryllacris.
Piotr

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Tsingy Bemaraha Katydid
Location: Western Madagascar
April 10, 2012 6:45 am
Hi there
I recently found this on the Bemaraha plateau at the village of Bevero in Madagascar. Have you any idea if it has been seen before? A designation down to species would be appreciated if possible. What possible advantage could there be in this shocking green and pink combination? Your thoughts please, Thank you. Len
Signature: Len deBeer

Raspy Cricket from Madagascar

Hi Len,
We will contact Katydid expert Piotr Naskrecki to see if he can identify this species which is possibly an immature specimen since it is lacking wings.  We don’t have a theory on the advantage of the coloration of this Katydid.

Piotr Naskrecki Responds
Hi Daniel,
This is not a katydid but a nymph of a gryllacridid, also known as a leaf-rolling or raspy cricket. But it would be difficult to ID the genus at this stage as this is a very young nymph.
Cheers,
Piotr

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination