Currently viewing the category: "Raspy Crickets"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What type of cricket (?) is this?
Geographic location of the bug:  Sydney, Australia
Date: 05/19/2019
Time: 08:36 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi this cricket (?) leapt at me and then tried to bite me! When I tried to initiate contact it reared back like a spider and it’s mandibles we’re clacking away.
How you want your letter signed:  Simon Carter

Raspy Cricket

Dear Simon,
This is a King Cricket in the genus
Australostoma.  There are images posted to FlickR and The Bug Chicks.  According to the Queensland Museum:  “Giant King Crickets are found only in rainforest in south-eastern Queensland and north-eastern New South Wales. They live in burrows in the soil and emerge on wet nights to forage on the rainforest floor for live insects and rotten fruit. They are closely related to the giant wetas of New Zealand.”

Raspy Cricket

Correction:  We received a comment from Matthew that this is actually a Raspy Cricket which is profiled on Brisbane Insects.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Cricket ???
Geographic location of the bug:  Angledool NSW
Date: 01/08/2018
Time: 05:26 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi,
Someone has suggested this is a raspy cricket – there are several neat round holes in trees without a net and a couple with a net. It is closed all day and there at night when we look. The net is hard and you can scratch it with your fingernail which makes the bug come to the entrance. It is water soluble as I wet some in my insect hotel (bottom levels) and it disintegrated.  Thank you
How you want your letter signed:  Kym

Raspy Cricket

Dear Kym,
The person who suggested that this is a Raspy Cricket is correct.  We have an image in our archive of a very similar Raspy Cricket lair, but without its inhabitant.  We suspect this is probably a Striped Raspy Cricket,
Paragryllacris combusta, a species pictured on Brisbane Insects where it states:  “Striped Raspy Crickets are also known as Tree Crickets. Adults are dark brown to pale brown in colour with fully developed wings. They have very long antenna, all legs are spiny.  They hide in nest on tree during the day. Their nest is usually two board leaves hold together by silky material. They are well known for their ability to find the way home after foraging distance away. ”  The site also states:  “The crickets are nocturnal species and are found wandering around vegetation during the night. ... The Cricket nests in holes in trees and between the leaf-sheaths of plants. 

Raspy Cricket

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Winged Weta
Geographic location of the bug:  Ramarama , pukekohe
Date: 12/03/2017
Time: 07:07 PM EDT
We believe this is a winged Weta. Question is it harmful to native insects / Weta’s  ? To kill or not to kill ?
How you want your letter signed:  Regards, marion Van Dijk.

Raspy Cricket

Dear Marion,
We believe this is a Raspy Cricket in the family Gryllacrididae.  Though we could not locate any images from New Zealand, there are numerous examples from Australia, including on the Brisbane Insect site.  We are confused why you would even be inquiring about killing it from our site.  We promote tolerance, not eradication.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Giant Cricket or Grasshopper
Geographic location of the bug:  Broken Hill
Date: 10/28/2017
Time: 07:20 PM EDT
I found this guy last night in the laundry room but my mums dead set on saying it’s a giant cricket, i think it’s a giant grasshopper myself, it’s about 7 cm long and the antennae puzzle me with being so long, all the images I’ve seen of grass hoppers they don’t have as long as this one.
poor things missing part of it’s leg.
can anyone identify it?
How you want your letter signed:  Hayden Crowley

Striped Raspy Cricket

Dear Hayden,
We are going to have to agree that mum is more correct than you are.  This appears to be either a Striped Raspy Cricket,
Paragryllacris combusta, or a closely related species.  According to the Brisbane Insect site:  “Striped Raspy Crickets are also known as Tree Crickets. Adults are dark brown to pale brown in colour with fully developed wings. They have very long antenna, all legs are spiny.  They hide in nest on tree during the day. Their nest is usually two board leaves hold together by silky material. They are well known for their ability to find the way home after foraging distance away. ”  It is also pictured on Atlas of Living Australia.

Striped Raspy Cricket

Wow thnks a lot, I was starting to agree with mum, the feet and antennas felt off eventho it had a body simular to that of a grasshopper, the only other crickets Iv’e seen are common ones that look completely diffrent.
Hayden Crowley
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Scared missus
Location: Whyalla in South Australia
December 8, 2016 4:19 am
Hey there Bugman. I have a bug my Girlfriend found when she went to the toilet. She was ready to leave and this fella started to come crawling up the wall near the window. Ive never seen one of these bugs before. hope you can help me work out what it is. I live in a town called Whyalla In South Australia.
Signature: Nino Longobardi

Raspy Cricket

Raspy Cricket

Dear Nino,
This looks like a Raspy Cricket to us.  While they are not considered dangerous, they do have powerful mandibles and may deliver a painful bite.  This image from FlickR looks very similar. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknown Katydid – northwest Queensland, Australia
Location: Cloncurry, Queensland
November 22, 2016 7:07 am
This lady turned up at my workplace today, and the photo was taken because she’s not a bug that we usually see here. With a bit of googling and posting on other sites (reddit), the consensus seems to be that she is a katydid of some sort, but with no positive confirmation. Unfortunately, she is no longer with us, as a nearby Peewee (Magpie Lark) thought that she looked delicious. (“It’s the circle of liiife…”)
She does look a bit like a katydid that was posted here a few years ago (2008/05/03/unknown-australian-katydid-killed-for-photo-op/)
Signature: Johnmc

Female Raspy Cricket

Female Raspy Cricket

Dear Johnmc,
The link you provided from our archives was a correct identification on your part, but it is not a Katydid.  We eventually identified that insect as a female Raspy Cricket, probably in the genus
Ametrus thanks to the input of Katydid expert Piotr Naskrecki, and somehow, duplicate postings were in our archive.  We deleted your link in favor of the correctly identified posting of the Raspy Cricket.  Here is another posting of what appears to be the same species of Raspy Cricket.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination