Currently viewing the category: "Crickets, Camel Crickets and Mole Crickets"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What type of cricket (?) is this?
Geographic location of the bug:  Sydney, Australia
Date: 05/19/2019
Time: 08:36 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi this cricket (?) leapt at me and then tried to bite me! When I tried to initiate contact it reared back like a spider and it’s mandibles we’re clacking away.
How you want your letter signed:  Simon Carter

Raspy Cricket

Dear Simon,
This is a King Cricket in the genus
Australostoma.  There are images posted to FlickR and The Bug Chicks.  According to the Queensland Museum:  “Giant King Crickets are found only in rainforest in south-eastern Queensland and north-eastern New South Wales. They live in burrows in the soil and emerge on wet nights to forage on the rainforest floor for live insects and rotten fruit. They are closely related to the giant wetas of New Zealand.”

Raspy Cricket

Correction:  We received a comment from Matthew that this is actually a Raspy Cricket which is profiled on Brisbane Insects.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  New species
Geographic location of the bug:  Ballarat
Date: 05/10/2019
Time: 06:36 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  What is this bug? Is it a new species?
How you want your letter signed:  Nate G

Mole Cricket

Dear Nate,
This is a Mole Cricket, and we probably have over 100 images of Mole Crickets on our site from all over the planet, including Australia.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Big type
Geographic location of the bug:  North Carolina
Date: 04/03/2019
Time: 01:41 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  You’re kinda creepy
How you want your letter signed:  What type of bug

Mole Cricket

Calling our editorial staff “kinda creepy” does not seem to be the best strategy for getting your Mole Cricket identified.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Strange insect!
Geographic location of the bug:  Houston, TX
Date: 03/07/2019
Time: 05:10 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Dear Bug Man,
I can’t figure out what this insect is. It looks like a cross between a crawfish and a cricket! What could this be?
How you want your letter signed:  Casey

Mole Cricket

Dear Casey,
This is a Mole Cricket, a subterranean dweller that is rarely noticed unless it comes to the surface.  Some individuals are capable of flight.  We have gotten several reports in the past of Mole Crickets swimming, but they are not aquatic.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  bug
Geographic location of the bug:  arrived on boat, Caribbean somewhere between Trinidad and Martinique, think it flew on board
Date: 01/26/2019
Time: 11:09 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Looks like a Jeruselem Cricket but has wings.
How you want your letter signed:  Chris

Mole Cricket

Dear Chris,
This is a wonderful image of a Mole Cricket, a primarily subterranean dweller that is found in many parts of the world.  Some species are capable of flight.  We have even had folks claim they can swim.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Insect identification
Geographic location of the bug:  N Myrtle Beach SC
Date: 09/17/2018
Time: 10:24 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hey bug man I came across this insect on the outside wall  of my garage today, after Hurricane Florence had passed. I’ve never seen this before, nor have my local friends. Just curious to find out what it is and perhaps some information on it.
Thanks for any insight
How you want your letter signed:  Maddy

Camel Cricket

Dear Maddy,
This is a Camel Cricket or Cave Cricket, and they are relatively common, though they are generally found in damp, dark places like basements.  Perhaps its home was flooded during the rain brought by Hurricane Florence.

Thank you so much for your rapid response! I’ll have share this with my friends

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination