Currently viewing the category: "Crickets, Camel Crickets and Mole Crickets"
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Subject:  What kind of insect is this?
Geographic location of the bug:  Central Iowa, near a pond, on ground near grass and Waters edge.
Date: 09/22/2017
Time: 06:12 PM EDT
Hi!
During a fieldtrip with my daughter’s 5th grade class, we found this bug. It stumped the conservationist, to say the least. None of us have ever seen one. Can you help us identify it!
It’s really end looks like a cricket, but it looked to be developing large wings, it has a head like an ant, and it’s front legs had what appeared to be tiny claws.
How you want your letter signed:  5th Grade class, Jordan Creek Elementary School, West Des Moines, IA

Mole Cricket

Dear 5th Grade class, Jordan Creek Elementary School,
You were on the right track when you observed it “looks like a cricket” because this is a Mole Cricket, a subterranean dweller that uses its front legs to quickly burrow in the dirt.  Though they live underground, Mole Crickets are capable of flying.  We get reports of Mole Crickets from many places around the world, including Australia, Iraq and South Africa as well as much of North America.

Mole Cricket

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What’s this bug?!
Geographic location of the bug:  Northern California
Date: 08/30/2017
Time: 04:38 AM EDT
It was making a very loud noise and flew into my house towards the light. It’s late August.
How you want your letter signed:  Thank you from Megan Osborn

Tree Cricket

Dear Megan,
This is a Tree Cricket, and they are quite loud.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Update on Grass Carrying Wasp from France
Location:  southwest France
August 29, 2017 8:05 AM
Hi Daniel,
Further to recent contacts, I have, at last, managed to get some half decent shots of the grass carrying wasps nesting in our patio table.
They have been pretty active these past few days – maybe the 35+ degree heat has turned them on – but they catch me out every time I have no camera ready. It really is a struggle to film them as they arrive and disappear to their nest(s) in no time at all.
However, the attached pics show one with a small cricket or grasshopper of some description and another close-up or the wasp just landing on the table.
I hope they are of sufficient quality to be of interest. I am still waiting for the shot of the wasp actually ‘doing what it says on the tin’ and carrying a piece of grass to the nest. I have been close a few times and will get it one day, although I figure nesting may well be approaching the end with the impending onset of autumn.
We have also noticed recent activity in the table by what I believe are some form of robber or parasitic wasp. The first one looked VERY like a large horsefly, the subsequent visitors more like a regular small brown wasp. Again, I have not been able to capture them on camera so I can’t ID them any better than that I’m afraid. The interesting thing is that they have been bringing in small crickets and the like, using the same holes as the grass carrying wasps. I don’t know whether they are nesting on their own behalf or feeding the larvae of the GCW’s for the benefit of their own offspring. The two species met on one visit to the nest entrance. The prey was jettisoned and there was an interesting ‘face-off’ with the larger, GCW probably winning on points I would say.
One final note on the GCW – it dropped its cricket on the table before landing at the nest hole and it was clearly evident that the prey was not dead, merely anaesthetised, as there were distinct signs of movement in both the legs and the ovipositor. I have no idea how long it is, following the bite, before they die  but this one didn’t seem to last more than a few minutes before it (seemingly) expired.
Thanks as ever for all you do to enlighten us on these matters. My wife thinks I spend an “unreasonable” amount of time perusing the site but she’s quite getting into our little wasp friends and alerts me now when one is ‘incoming’. There’s hope yet!
All the best,
Robin

Grass Carrying Wasp with Prey

Dear Robin,
Your diligence has paid off.  We love the image of the Grass Carrying Wasp with its Tree Cricket prey.

Grass Carrying Wasp

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this bug
Location: Green Bay Wisconsin
August 24, 2017 9:22 am
We found this bug yesterday it was feeding on sulfates.
Signature: Bill Richer

Two Spotted Tree Cricket

Dear Bill,
This is a female Two Spotted Tree Cricket.  Your image has beautiful detail.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Weevil-like head, mantid body
Location: Johnsville, KY
August 22, 2017 5:02 pm
I can’t seem to find this beastie online or in my tiny book. I’m in northern Kentucky, bracken county, which is mostly wooded limestone hills and hollers. I found it in the inside of a barn door at dusk. Temp approx. 76 F. It never moved but eventually fell off the door. I’m not good at estimating but id say it was about two inches long.
Signature: To Mr. Adams’ Science Classes

Two Spotted Tree Cricket

Dear Mr. Adams’ Science Classes,
This is a female Two Spotted Tree Cricket,
Neoxabea bipunctata.  According to BugGuide:  “Two-spotted Tree Cricket, can be found on a wide variety of vegetation including (but not restricted to): Grapevine, Sunflower, Maple Tree, White Pine Tree, Apple Tree, Post Oak Tree. They are generally high on tall plants or in trees.” 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Help Me Identify This!!!
Location: Ankara, Turkey
August 8, 2017 11:29 am
Dear Mr./Mrs.
I recently found this creature on the side of the road, took its photo and let it go. However I couldn’t understand what kind of bug it is. I asked many locals but they don’t know it as well. Since I have never seen such creature I thought you might help me identify it. Details are as follows:
-Date: 1st of August 2017
-Location: Ankara, Turkey
-Climate: Continental Climate
-Size of the creature: Approximately 5-7cm (2-2.75inch)
-Behavior of the creature: Cumbersome, non-aggressive and flightless
I would love to know what kind of creature this is. Thank you for your time.
Signature: Orcun Bekem

Mole Cricket

Dear Orcun,
This is a Mole Cricket, a subterranean insect that uses its powerful front legs to dig.  Many Mole Crickets are capable of flight as well.  We get requests to identify Mole Crickets from all around the world.

Thank you very much for your quick and informative response. Please keep doing what you are doing.
—Orcun Bekem
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination