Currently viewing the category: "Crickets, Camel Crickets and Mole Crickets"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Creepiest bug ever!
Geographic location of the bug:  Westchester County, ny
Date: 05/20/2018
Time: 08:29 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found this guy in our basement playroom.   It is 2-3” in length.  It’s front claws seem to be  clubs with  sharp looking finger like  protrusions.   Then two more sets  of legs.  The rear has 3 spikes. 1 longer than the other 2   Thank you!
How you want your letter signed:  Lucille

Mole Cricket

Dear Lucille,
We see from a subsequent email that you have already identified your Mole Cricket.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Large, strange bug!
Geographic location of the bug:  Northeast Florida
Date: 03/21/2018
Time: 03:12 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Letting my dog out and noticed this guy in a forgotten container. Looks like it has wings but doesn’t seem to be able to get out.  Thanks!
How you want your letter signed:  Dawn

Mole Cricket

Dear Dawn,
Because of their large size, unusual appearance and nearly global distribution range, we get identification requests for Mole Crickets from many different countries and continents.  Some Mole Crickets are capable of flight, but they are basically subterranean dwellers that dig beneath the surface of the ground.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  what is that bug?
Geographic location of the bug:  italy, near caserta
Date: 02/12/2018
Time: 09:23 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi, could you please help me in identifying this insect.
kind regards
How you want your letter signed:  umberto prisco

Mole Cricket

Dear Umberto,
Mole Crickets like the one in your image are relatively common subterranean insects that are found in many parts of the world.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Cricket ???
Geographic location of the bug:  Angledool NSW
Date: 01/08/2018
Time: 05:26 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi,
Someone has suggested this is a raspy cricket – there are several neat round holes in trees without a net and a couple with a net. It is closed all day and there at night when we look. The net is hard and you can scratch it with your fingernail which makes the bug come to the entrance. It is water soluble as I wet some in my insect hotel (bottom levels) and it disintegrated.  Thank you
How you want your letter signed:  Kym

Raspy Cricket

Dear Kym,
The person who suggested that this is a Raspy Cricket is correct.  We have an image in our archive of a very similar Raspy Cricket lair, but without its inhabitant.  We suspect this is probably a Striped Raspy Cricket,
Paragryllacris combusta, a species pictured on Brisbane Insects where it states:  “Striped Raspy Crickets are also known as Tree Crickets. Adults are dark brown to pale brown in colour with fully developed wings. They have very long antenna, all legs are spiny.  They hide in nest on tree during the day. Their nest is usually two board leaves hold together by silky material. They are well known for their ability to find the way home after foraging distance away. ”  The site also states:  “The crickets are nocturnal species and are found wandering around vegetation during the night. ... The Cricket nests in holes in trees and between the leaf-sheaths of plants. 

Raspy Cricket

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What’s that bug?
Geographic location of the bug:  Plantation, FL
Date: 01/01/2018
Time: 09:48 PM EDT
Hello,
My husband found this bug a couple of days ago, never seen it before.
Thank you!
How you want your letter signed:  Lanny A

Mole Cricket

Dear Lanny,
Because they are subterranean dwellers, Mole Crickets are generally not observed until they dig to the surface.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Winged Weta
Geographic location of the bug:  Ramarama , pukekohe
Date: 12/03/2017
Time: 07:07 PM EDT
We believe this is a winged Weta. Question is it harmful to native insects / Weta’s  ? To kill or not to kill ?
How you want your letter signed:  Regards, marion Van Dijk.

Raspy Cricket

Dear Marion,
We believe this is a Raspy Cricket in the family Gryllacrididae.  Though we could not locate any images from New Zealand, there are numerous examples from Australia, including on the Brisbane Insect site.  We are confused why you would even be inquiring about killing it from our site.  We promote tolerance, not eradication.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination