Currently viewing the category: "Crickets, Camel Crickets and Mole Crickets"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Winged Weta
Geographic location of the bug:  Ramarama , pukekohe
Date: 12/03/2017
Time: 07:07 PM EDT
We believe this is a winged Weta. Question is it harmful to native insects / Weta’s  ? To kill or not to kill ?
How you want your letter signed:  Regards, marion Van Dijk.

Raspy Cricket

Dear Marion,
We believe this is a Raspy Cricket in the family Gryllacrididae.  Though we could not locate any images from New Zealand, there are numerous examples from Australia, including on the Brisbane Insect site.  We are confused why you would even be inquiring about killing it from our site.  We promote tolerance, not eradication.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Spider?
Geographic location of the bug:  LaGrange Park
Date: 12/01/2017
Time: 10:17 AM EDT
Is this a spider? Does it bite? I found it inside my house, in the bedroom.
How you want your letter signed:  Curious

Camel Cricket

Dear Curious,
This is a Camel Cricket, a harmless creature that is often found in dark, damp places like basements.  Though it was our Bug of the Month back in 2009, we felt it was time for that honor again.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Can you identify this insect?
Geographic location of the bug:  Indianapolis Indiana
Date: 11/09/2017
Time: 02:10 AM EDT
Need help
How you want your letter signed:  Thanks

Camel Cricket

This is a Camel Cricket in the family Rhaphidophoridae.  They are frequently found in dark, damp basements where they will feed on a large variety of materials.  According to BugGuide:  “Most are omnivorous and will feed on most anything organic. Many (if not most) will catch and eat other smaller animals when they can. In houses may chew on paper products, occasionally fabric.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Giant Cricket or Grasshopper
Geographic location of the bug:  Broken Hill
Date: 10/28/2017
Time: 07:20 PM EDT
I found this guy last night in the laundry room but my mums dead set on saying it’s a giant cricket, i think it’s a giant grasshopper myself, it’s about 7 cm long and the antennae puzzle me with being so long, all the images I’ve seen of grass hoppers they don’t have as long as this one.
poor things missing part of it’s leg.
can anyone identify it?
How you want your letter signed:  Hayden Crowley

Striped Raspy Cricket

Dear Hayden,
We are going to have to agree that mum is more correct than you are.  This appears to be either a Striped Raspy Cricket,
Paragryllacris combusta, or a closely related species.  According to the Brisbane Insect site:  “Striped Raspy Crickets are also known as Tree Crickets. Adults are dark brown to pale brown in colour with fully developed wings. They have very long antenna, all legs are spiny.  They hide in nest on tree during the day. Their nest is usually two board leaves hold together by silky material. They are well known for their ability to find the way home after foraging distance away. ”  It is also pictured on Atlas of Living Australia.

Striped Raspy Cricket

Wow thnks a lot, I was starting to agree with mum, the feet and antennas felt off eventho it had a body simular to that of a grasshopper, the only other crickets Iv’e seen are common ones that look completely diffrent.
Hayden Crowley
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Cricket looking thingy
Geographic location of the bug:  Bel Air Maryland
Date: 10/24/2017
Time: 05:58 PM EDT
Not sure what he is, he didn’t show up in Google images. It hissed at me when I poked it with a leaf.
How you want your letter signed:  concerned person

Cricket

Dear concerned person,
This is definitely a Cricket in the family Gryllidae and most likely a Field Cricket in the genus
Gryllus.  According to BugGuide:  “A very difficult genus, because most species are extremely similar in appearance and in morphology. In a given area, it is usually possible to learn the various species through experience, by learning which songs go with which crickets at what time of year. However, from photographs and even with pinned specimens it is very difficult if not impossible to identify many individuals with certainty. A few species are distinctive enough to recognize on sight, but most are not. This is a group where it is actually usually easier to identify a specimen by hearing it than by seeing it! Another complication is the fact that several species (especially in the west) do not even have names yet. And yet another complication is that females do not sing.”  Your individual is a singing male.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  I’ve never seen this bug before
Geographic location of the bug:  North America in Knoxville, Iowa
Date: 10/23/2017
Time: 12:13 AM EDT
This bug was just chilling on my door frame last summer and I haven’t been able to find what it was since then! Hoping you could help! Thank you!
How you want your letter signed:  Kelsey Colwell

Two Spotted Tree Cricket

Dear Kelsey,
This is a female Two Spotted Tree Cricket.  According to BugGuide:  “Two-spotted Tree Cricket, can be found on a wide variety of vegetation including (but not restricted to): Grapevine, Sunflower, Maple Tree, White Pine Tree, Apple Tree, Post Oak Tree. They are generally high on tall plants or in trees.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination