Currently viewing the category: "Stink Bugs and Shield Bugs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Stinbug sucking on a monarch caterpillar.
Geographic location of the bug:  Western New York State
Date: 08/09/2018
Time: 09:17 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  My wife was so excited to see a monarch caterpillar in our garden today (8/9/2018), only to discover that its “friend” was sucking its insides out.  I could tell the vampire was a true bug, but I had thought they mostly drank plant sap. How specific are they? Does it specialize in monarchs or does  feed  other larvae? Thanks! You guys are awesome!
How you want your letter signed:  Mark VanDerwater

Spined Soldier Bug preys on Monarch Caterpillar

Dear Mark,
While most Stink Bugs feed on fluids from plants, one subfamily, Asopinae, is predatory.  We believe we have correctly identified your Predatory Stink Bug as
Apoecilus cynicus thanks to this BugGuide image.  According to BugGuide:  “mostly feeds on caterpillars” but luckily they do not limit their diet to solely Monarch Caterpillars so relocating the Predatory Stink Bug far from the milkweed, perhaps in the vegetable patch, would be our solution to repeating this scenario in the future. 

Thank you Daniel! I was poking around insect sights too and came up with the spined soldier bug, Podisus maculiventris. Known to prefer lepidoptera larvae. Also has the dark abdominal tip.

Hi Mark,
We agree that you have provided us with a correction.  The Spined Soldier Bug is another member of the Predatory Stink Bug subfamily, and this BugGuide image is a good match, and the BugGuide description “Black streak on wing membrane + spined humeri are diagnostic” matches your image.  Thanks for bringing this misidentification to our attention. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Date: 08/04/2018
Subject:  What’s this bug
Date: 08/04/2018
Time: 09:19 PM EDT
Geographic location of the bug:  Ontario
Your letter to the bugman:  Can u please help me identify this bug it is everywhere
How you want your letter signed:  A

Green Stink Bug nymphs

Dear A,
This is an aggregation of Green Stink Bug nympsh,
Chinavia hilaris.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What’s this bug?
Geographic location of the bug:  Hyde Park/Dutchess County, NY
Date: 08/07/2018
Time: 11:23 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello!
I just found this bug in my patch of green beans. Have a market garden and have found a bunch of these bugs.  Can you help me identify and give me any particulars about it? Thanks.
How you want your letter signed:  Lisa Arnoff

Green Stink Bug nymph

Dear Lisa,
This is a Green Stink Bug nymph,
Chinavia hilaris, which we identified on BugGuide.  We have gotten several identification requests in the past week, and since your image is especially nice, we will be posting it.  Adult Green Stink Bugs are green, as would be expected, with wings.  According to BugGuide:  “extremely polyphagous: recorded from 20 plant families; adults and older nymphs prefer developing seeds and fruit. May be a pest on soybean, cotton, fruit trees (esp. peach), and many vegetables”

Thank you. Excited to have my photo featured!
Lisa Arnoff

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Eggs on back of apple leaf
Geographic location of the bug:  Provo, Utah
Date: 06/25/2018
Time: 03:22 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Two areas on the back of this apple leaf. I don’t recognize either. First is the cluster of eggs or small bugs in orange and black and the second is the white lattice structure.
How you want your letter signed:  Ken Loveland

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug Hatchlings

Dear Ken,
Your image depicts the hatched eggs and the newly hatched nymphs of the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug, a recently introduced, highly invasive species that has spread across North America in just a few years.  Here is a BugGuide image for comparison.  According to BugGuide:  “in the US, reported to damage apples, pears, peaches, cherries, corn, tomatoes, peppers, soybean, ornamentals…”

Wow. That’s horrible news. Thanks so much for the information and for your service.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Pretty Bug
Geographic location of the bug:  Bolsa Chica Reserve, Huntington Beach, CA
Date: 05/22/2018
Time: 02:06 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  We saw many of these colorful bugs on a bladder pod plant. What are they?
How you want your letter signed:  Espressive

Harlequin Stink Bugs

These colorful Harlequin Stink Bugs, Murgantia histrionica, are commonly found feeding on plants in the cabbage family, so you finding them on bladderpod piqued our curiosity.  According to BugGuide:  “hosts: primarily Brassicaceae (horseradish, cabbage, cauliflower, collards, mustard, Brussels sprouts, turnip, kohlrabi, radish); may also attack tomato, potato, eggplant, okra, bean, asparagus, beet, weeds, fruit trees and field crops.

Hi,
Thanks for the fast turnaround! I looked around quite a bit in What’s That Bug and the Bug Guide, but didn’t find these. Thanks for the answer.
Didn’t Charles Darwin once say that all his studies of nature taught him that God is inordinately fond of beetles? (and bugs, too). There are so many, if you don’t have a name to search on it’s just luck trying to find what you’re looking for.
Regards,
Gay
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Ornate white lined shield bug needs a name!
Geographic location of the bug:  Cheyenne, Wyoming
Date: 05/21/2018
Time: 01:27 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  My friend sent me a picture of this shield bug.  However, I have never seen anything like it.  Moths, yes, but not a shield bug.
Could you please help me narrow down the shield bug identification?
Thank you!!
How you want your letter signed:  Fish Seal

Two Spotted Stink Bug

Dear Fish Seal,
This is a Two Spotted Stink Bug, a species that is highly variable in color.  Some individuals are white like the one you sent us for identification, and some Two Spotted Stink Bugs are red in color.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination