Currently viewing the category: "Stink Bugs and Shield Bugs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Insect ID
Geographic location of the bug:  North Central Massachusetts
Date: 08/29/2018
Time: 05:18 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Can you please ID this bug I found on my cannabis plant?
How you want your letter signed:  thanks, Hammer

Spined Soldier Bug Eggs

Dear Hammer,
These are Stink Bug eggs, and generally, if a gardener finds a cluster of Stink Bug eggs on a cherished plant, it would be a problem, but thank to this BugGuide image, we have identified the eggs you found as those of a predatory Spined Soldier Bug in the genus
Podisus.  If you have not destroyed the eggs, we would urge you to return them or allow them to hatch and return the nymphs back to the plant because according to BugGuide:  “preys on a wide variety of other arthropods, especially larval forms of Lepidoptera and Coleoptera. Examples: known to eat Mexican bean beetles, European corn borers, diamondback moths, corn earworms, beet armyworms, fall armyworms, cabbage loopers, imported cabbageworms, Colorado potato beetles, and velvetbean caterpillars.”  We have learned that the Tobacco Budworm, Heliothis virescens, a species of Cutworm, can decimate a budding Cannabis plant that is close to harvest by burrowing into the center of the bud and feeding from the inside out without being detected until the entire bud turns brown. Here is a BugGuide image of the hatchling Spined Soldier Bugs so you can recognize them, and recognizing the adult Spined Soldier Bug will allow you to maintain the species in your garden so your crop will be more organic. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What bug is this?
Geographic location of the bug:  Cincinnati,  ohio
Date: 08/28/2018
Time: 09:34 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi! We found this guy munching on some caterpillars on our kale plant.  Any idea what kind of big this is?
How you want your letter signed:  Ginja ninja

Predatory Stink Bug Nymph eats Caterpillar

Dear Ginja ninja,
The predator is a Stink Bug nymph and we have identified it as an immature Spined Soldier Bug, a member of the genus
Podisus, thanks to this BugGuide image.  According to BugGuide:  “preys on a wide variety of other arthropods, especially larval forms of Lepidoptera and Coleoptera. known to eat Mexican bean beetles, European corn borers, diamondback moths, corn earworms, beet armyworms, fall armyworms, cabbage loopers, imported cabbageworms, Colorado potato beetles, and velvetbean caterpillars.”  We will attempt to identify your Moth Caterpillar as well, but we are surmising that since it was found on kale, it is most likely an undesirable species.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Little Stinkers
Geographic location of the bug:  Andover, NJ
Date: 08/18/2018
Time: 03:56 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi Daniel,
Just a share.  I found a little cluster of what I believe to be Marmolated Stink Bugs on a hibiscus plant and have been keeping an eye on them.  At first they move around together like a little battalion – very cute.  Today, however, they molted and started setting out on their own.  All were black except one that is white.  I thought that was odd, but read here that sometimes freshly molted nymphs of this species are white, so assume that is what it is.  I am attached a couple of photos showing both color variations as well as one of a nymph inspecting the exuvia, almost as if to say “I can’t believe I used to fit into that thing.”
Hope you are having a great, buggy weekend.
How you want your letter signed:  Deborah Bifulco

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug nymph

Hi Deborah,
Based on this BugGuide image, your nymphs are in the second instar phase, meaning they have molted once since hatching.  They change and get larger after each molt.

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug nymphs

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug nymphs

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What’s This Bug on my Super Lemon Haze hybrid?
Geographic location of the bug:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
Date: 08/12/2018
Time: 08:30 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Dear Bugman,
I was out inspecting my garden this morning and discovered a new bug on my Super Lemon Haze hybrid.  Is this a friend or foe?  I am especially concerned as my plants are beginning to bud.
Thanks
How you want your letter signed: Constant Gardener

Red Shouldered Stink Bug on Woody Plant

Dear Constant Gardener,
This is a Stink Bug in the family Pentatomidae, and most members of the family feed on plants by piercing the surface and sucking fluids with a proboscis, while others are predatory and beneficial in the garden.  We quickly identified your individual as
Thyanta pallidovirens thanks to this BugGuide image, but unfortunately, BugGuide does not provide many specifics on the species or its feeding habits.  Encyclopedia of Life calls this species the Red Shouldered Stink Bug.  The University of California Integrated Pest Management System recognizes it as a pest of tomatoes and other crops, so our opinion is “foe.”

Stink Bug, Thyanta pallidovirens, on Woody Plant

Facebook Comment from Jason Stowe:
It seems the easiest way to get a question answered or a bug identified is to take it on a pot plant.

Rebuttal from Our Editorial Staff:
Over the years, we have created tags related to specific plants that have ecosystems associated with them, including Milkweed Meadow, Goldenrod Meadow and Tomato Bugs as well as the recently added What’s on my Woody Plant?, the latter focusing on insects found by home
Cannabis growers.  What’s That Bug? currently has 26,186 unique postings and only 33 are archived on the tag that targets Cannabis growers.  That represents .126% of our postings.  That said, Jason Stowe is exaggerating.  By comparison there are 973 postings currently archived on WTB? Down Under representing 3.72% of our postings, so, in fact, a far easier way to get something identified is to move to Australia.  Also, for the record, what we really hate identifying are victims of Unnecessary Carnage, yet we have identified 263 of them, and that is only the submissions we have posted and tagged, and does not take into consideration replies we have made but not posted.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  The things you find in vault toilets
Geographic location of the bug:  Yellowtail Wildlife Habitat Management Area – WY
Date: 08/10/2018
Time: 11:14 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found this little guy tummy up next to the latrine, and I was pondering if it was a tick, so I flipped it over and discovered a beautiful little beetle instead. Too broad to bring up in a search for black and white beetles. Any ideas? It was about the size of well used pencil eraser….
Thanks,  as always,
How you want your letter signed:  Tina in Wyoming

Two Spotted Stink Bug

Dear Tina in Wyoming,
You might have searched on the internet for an interminable amount of time for a “black and white beetle” because this is not a Beetle, but rather a True Bug.  Beetles and True Bugs have many diverging physical traits, but one of the easiest ways to distinguish them is by their mouths:  Beetles have mandibles for chewing, while True Bugs have a proboscis adapted for piercing and sucking.  The insect you have described as “beautiful” goes by the ignominious name Two Spotted Stink Bug, and individuals vary quite a bit in color, with some individuals having quite a bit of red (or orange or yellow) as well as black and white.  The Two Spotted Stink Bug is an important predator, and according to BugGuide:  “primarily preys on Colorado Potato Beetle and other chrysomelids ( but also on caterpillars)” and “each individual is capable of destroying an average of 231.5 Colorado potato beetle eggs during its nymphal development and 150 to 200 larvae during its lifetime,” though we don’t know how it is possible to destroy half an egg.

LOL, thank you for the information and the morning chuckle. One of my friends suggested it should be named

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Unknown bug
Geographic location of the bug:  Northern Michigan – Charlevoix
Date: 08/10/2018
Time: 07:19 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  We have never seen this bug. What is it?  Seen 3 in 2 days.
How you want your letter signed:  Tracy

Green Stink Bug nymph

Dear Tracy,
We have been getting numerous requests in the past week to identify Green Stink Bug nymphs,
Chinavia hilaris.  According to BugGuide:  “extremely polyphagous: recorded from 20 plant families; adults and older nymphs prefer developing seeds and fruit. May be a pest on soybean, cotton, fruit trees (esp. peach), and many vegetables.”  Your image is really good for identification purposes and nicely illustrates scale.  Here is a BugGuide image for comparison.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination