Currently viewing the category: "Stink Bugs and Shield Bugs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Black with orange and yellow markings a tick or fly or mite
Geographic location of the bug:  Israel
Date: 01/22/2019
Time: 04:34 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Is this a tick. If not what is it. Looks a bit like a lone star tick
How you want your letter signed:  Hilly Abe

Variegated Caper Bug

Dear Hilly Abe,
This is NOT a tick.  At first we thought this Stink Bug in the family Pentatomidae might be an African Painted Bug, but we could not find record of it is Israel.  Our searching took us to Israel’s Nature Site and the Heteroptera of Israel page where we identified your Stink Bug as
Stenozygum coloratum. Encyclopedia of Life has an image of a aggregation of nymphs, and according to the European Journal of Entomology:  “The variegated caper bug (CB) Stenozygum coloratum (Klug, 1845) is common in the Eastern Mediterranean region and a minor agricultural pest.”

Thanks! Great service!
H

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Gerald
Geographic location of the bug:  Duxbury, Massachusetts
Date: 01/10/2019
Time: 12:53 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello Mr. Bugman,
My friends and I have enjoyed our chemistry class while watching our friend Gerald, a dead bug, who passed away a week ago. I am truly hurt that he was killed, but he brings us good luck to every class. He was very near and dear to my heart, and I would love to know what bug he is. R.I.P. Gerald <3
How you want your letter signed:  Thanks!

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug

We are sorry for the loss of your good luck mascot, but alas, Gerald is a Brown Marmorated Stink Bug, an invasive, exotic species that was first reported from Pennsylvania at the end of the 20th Century and has now spread across much of the North American continent.  Brown Marmorated Stink Bugs frequently enter homes to hibernate.  Brown Marmorated Stink Bugs pose a significant threat to agriculture, and according to BugGuide:  “Highly polyphagous, reported on ~300 plant spp. in its native range; feeds mostly on fruit, but also on leaves, stems, petioles, flowers, and seeds. Damage typically confined to fruiting structures” and “in the US, reported to damage apples, pears, peaches, cherries, corn, tomatoes, peppers, soybean, ornamentals…”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Found four of these in my house
Geographic location of the bug:  Northern westchester.  South salem new york
Date: 12/22/2018
Time: 03:09 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found one dead on A sweater in my drawer, another on the steps and two more. They are hard shelled. Please see if you can identify.
How you want your letter signed:  Roberts

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug

Dear Roberts,
While your image is quite blurry, we are confident this is a Brown Marmorated Stink Bug, an Invasive Exotic species from Asia that is now established across North America.  Invasive Exotic species often proliferate as they have no natural enemies.  They are also Household Pests since they seek shelter indoors to escape our cold winters.  Brown Marmorated Stink Bugs pose a significant threat to agriculture since, according to BugGuide, they are “Highly polyphagous, reported on ~300 plant spp. in its native range; feeds mostly on fruit, but also on leaves, stems, petioles, flowers, and seeds. Damage typically confined to fruiting structures.”  Indoors they are a nuisance, but they will not damage your home nor its furnishings.

Thank you so much!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Unidentified Beetle
Geographic location of the bug:  New Jersey
Date: 10/28/2018
Time: 11:29 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This bug was just walking on our carpet and I thought it would be easy to identify.  Ah, nope.  I have looked at hundreds of pictures and can’t spot it.
It is black, with 2 yellow dots and some small yellow stripes on the tail.  6 legs.
How you want your letter signed:  Lee

Green Stink Bug Nymph

Dear Lee,
This is not a beetle.  It is a Green Stink Bug nymph,
Chinavia hilaris, and it is pictured on BugGuide

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Mating Stink Bugs
Geographic location of the bug:  Jacksonville, Florida
Date: 09/22/2018
Time: 09:50 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I saw these flat, mating bugs that look like some sort of stink bug.  The picture was taken 9/22/2018 around 12:30 PM.
How you want your letter signed:  EK Gilley

Mating Rough Stink Bugs

Dear EK Gilley,
These are indeed mating Stink Bugs.  More specifically, they are mating Tree Stink Bugs or Rough Stink Bugs in the genus
Brochymena.  According to BugGuide:  “Usually bark-like (cryptic). Lateral teeth on juga. Head elongated, pronotum laterally with toothlike projections, and rear margin of abdomen has pleated pattern.”  We haven’t posted a new image representing this genus in over a decade and we have learned quite a bit since then.  We used to write that they are a predatory species (a claim we never source cited) but we have come to realize this is not always the case, and as BugGuide indicates, they are:  “phytophagous (some reports of predation).” 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Blue beetle?
Geographic location of the bug:  Homestead , FL
Date: 09/10/2018
Time: 07:40 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Found about 15-20 of  these pairing up in the hedges near the Dante Fascell visitor center of biscayne National Park. Can you give me an ID?
How you want your letter signed:  Lisa

Stink Bug

Dear Lisa,
These are not Beetles.  They are Stink Bugs and we identified them as
Murgantia violascens thanks to BugGuide where it states the range is:  “FL / W. Indies, BG records are from Key West.”  The species is also pictured on iNaturalist.

Stink Bug

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination