Currently viewing the category: "Stink Bugs and Shield Bugs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this?
Location: East Florida
June 28, 2017 11:53 am
Hello bugman.
I found these bugs under a leaf in my garden. Are they good bugs? Do they kill bad bugs?
Signature: Crystal

Stink Bug Hatchlings

Dear Crystal,
These are Stink Bug hatchlings in the family Pentatomidae.  Most Stink Bugs feed on plants, but there are some predatory species, though these do not look like a predatory species.  They might be hatchlings of the invasive Brown Marmorated Stink Bug, but many Stink Bug hatchlings look similar.  Based on this BugGuide image, your individuals might be in the genus
Podisus.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s this beetle
Location: Oak Park, Il
June 24, 2017 8:23 am
Been doing extensive research and can’t identify this beetle. I’m in Oak Park, Illinois and hoping it’s not destructive to the garden
Signature: Magnew

Spined Soldier Bug Nymph

Dear Magnew,
This is not a Beetle, which might explain the difficulty you have had identifying this immature Stink Bug.  We believe it is a predatory Spined Soldier Bug nymph,
Podisus maculiventris, based on this BugGuide image.  According to BugGuide it is:  “available commercially as biocontrol agent against a wide array of agriculturally significant pests” and it feeds on a “Wide variety of insects; known to eat Mexican bean beetles, European corn borers, diamondback moths, corn earworms, beet armyworms, fall armyworms, cabbage loopers, imported cabbageworms, Colorado potato beetles, velvetbean caterpillars and flea beetles.”

Thanks so much for solving the mystery AND your quick response! I’m happy to hear it’s not destructive to my plants.
Mindy Agnew

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beetle? Missouri
Location: Holts Summit, Missouri
June 5, 2017 11:02 am
Hi, I’ve asked several entomologists what this is and no one knows! Hoping for an ID, thanks! The beetle measured about 5/8 inch long and was found at the edge of a densely wooded area, central Missouri.
Signature: Pam Hackler

Stink Bug Nymph

Dear Pam,
This is not a beetle.  This is an immature Stink Bug in the family Pentatomidae, but we have not had any luck identifying the species on BugGuide, nor did we find any matching images on the Missouri Botanical Gardens Stink Bug page.  Perhaps one of our readers will be able to provide a species name.

Stink Bug Nymph

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Mystery eggs
Location: Alton, Illinois, USA
May 28, 2017 1:12 pm
I was wandering around my yard with my tortoise when I discovered a tiny dying leaf with tiny eggs on it. I am totally clueless and need help identifying!
Signature: Sarah D

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug Eggs

Dear Sarah,
We are quite certain these are Stink Bug eggs, and after comparing them to this BugGuide image, we are fairly certain they are Brown Marmorated Stink Bug,
Halymorpha halys, eggs.  The Brown Marmorated Stink Bug is an Invasive Exotic Species and according to BugGuide:  “Native to E. Asia, adventive elsewhere(2); in our area, mostly e US and West Coast states.”  First collected in Pennsylvania in 1998, in just a few years, this noxious species has spread from coast to coast according to BugGuide data.  In addition to doing major agricultural damage, according to BugGuide:  “Highly polyphagous, reported on ~300 plant spp. in its native range; feeds mostly on fruit, but also on leaves, stems, petioles, flowers, and seeds. Damage typically confined to fruiting structures,” the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug is a source of consternation to homemakers because they frequently enter homes in large numbers to hibernate when the weather begins to cool.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Ladybug?
Location: Long Beach, CA
May 26, 2017 12:32 am
Hi Bugman,
I’ve tried IDing this beauty but never found it online. After comparing its shape & size, I
think it’s lady bug. Hoping for confirmation. Thanks!
Signature: Sharon in Long Beach

Southern Green Stink Bug Nymph

Dear Sharon,
This is NOT a Lady Bug which is actually a beetle.  This is the nymph of a Southern Green Stink Bug,
Nezara viridula, an invasive, exotic species that is “cosmopolitan, presumably of African and/or Mediterranean origin” according to BugGuide which also states:  “highly polyphagous (recorded from hundreds of spp. in >30 plant families), attacking a wide variety of crop plants; especially damaging to new shoots and fruits, including those of soybeans, peas, and cotton.”

Oh noooo! Thanks for the quick update and I love the site! Always go there first.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Black Lady Bug-like Bug w Yellow Spots?
Location: Northeast Los Angeles
May 15, 2017 9:20 pm
Hello-
Found these critters clustering on my Arroyo Azul Sage and Clarkia today, here in northeast Los Angeles. I assumed lady bugs, but upon closer inspection, thought not. Ribbed shell too weird, etc. Harlequin bugs? Help!
Signature: David N

Southern Green Stink Bug Nymphs

Dear David,
Nymphs can be difficult to identify, but we are confident we have correctly identified these Southern Green Stink Bug nymphs, , thanks to an image that led us to Featured Creatures where we learned:  “The southern green stink bug is believed to have originated in Ethiopia. Its distribution now includes the tropical and subtropical regions of Europe, Asia, Africa and the Americas. In South America, it is expanding its range to Paraguay, south Argentina and toward the north-east of Brazil, due to expanding soybean production (Panizzi 2008). In North America, it is limited primarily to the southeastern United States, Virginia to Florida in the east, Ohio and Arkansas in the midwest, and to Texas in the southwest. It is also established in Hawaii and California (Capinera 2001).”  Based on images posted there, these are third instar nymphs.  According to BugGuide:  “highly polyphagous (recorded from hundreds of spp. in >30 plant families), attacking a wide variety of crop plants; especially damaging to new shoots and fruits, including those of soybeans, peas, and cotton.”  Since sage is often considered a natural insect repellent, we were surprised to learn that this species is not affected by the strong oils found in sage.  Since they feed by piercing the plant and sucking fluids, we would recommend hand picking them to remove them.  Can you be more specific about your location?  Our offices are in Mount Washington.

Southern Green Stink Bug Nymphs

I am in Eagle Rock, 1 block north of Colorado, 2 west of Eagle Rock Blvd.
They’re going to die today. Do you want to come see them?
David
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination