Currently viewing the category: "Stink Bugs and Shield Bugs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Eggs on back of apple leaf
Geographic location of the bug:  Provo, Utah
Date: 06/25/2018
Time: 03:22 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Two areas on the back of this apple leaf. I don’t recognize either. First is the cluster of eggs or small bugs in orange and black and the second is the white lattice structure.
How you want your letter signed:  Ken Loveland

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug Hatchlings

Dear Ken,
Your image depicts the hatched eggs and the newly hatched nymphs of the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug, a recently introduced, highly invasive species that has spread across North America in just a few years.  Here is a BugGuide image for comparison.  According to BugGuide:  “in the US, reported to damage apples, pears, peaches, cherries, corn, tomatoes, peppers, soybean, ornamentals…”

Wow. That’s horrible news. Thanks so much for the information and for your service.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Pretty Bug
Geographic location of the bug:  Bolsa Chica Reserve, Huntington Beach, CA
Date: 05/22/2018
Time: 02:06 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  We saw many of these colorful bugs on a bladder pod plant. What are they?
How you want your letter signed:  Espressive

Harlequin Stink Bugs

These colorful Harlequin Stink Bugs, Murgantia histrionica, are commonly found feeding on plants in the cabbage family, so you finding them on bladderpod piqued our curiosity.  According to BugGuide:  “hosts: primarily Brassicaceae (horseradish, cabbage, cauliflower, collards, mustard, Brussels sprouts, turnip, kohlrabi, radish); may also attack tomato, potato, eggplant, okra, bean, asparagus, beet, weeds, fruit trees and field crops.

Hi,
Thanks for the fast turnaround! I looked around quite a bit in What’s That Bug and the Bug Guide, but didn’t find these. Thanks for the answer.
Didn’t Charles Darwin once say that all his studies of nature taught him that God is inordinately fond of beetles? (and bugs, too). There are so many, if you don’t have a name to search on it’s just luck trying to find what you’re looking for.
Regards,
Gay
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Ornate white lined shield bug needs a name!
Geographic location of the bug:  Cheyenne, Wyoming
Date: 05/21/2018
Time: 01:27 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  My friend sent me a picture of this shield bug.  However, I have never seen anything like it.  Moths, yes, but not a shield bug.
Could you please help me narrow down the shield bug identification?
Thank you!!
How you want your letter signed:  Fish Seal

Two Spotted Stink Bug

Dear Fish Seal,
This is a Two Spotted Stink Bug, a species that is highly variable in color.  Some individuals are white like the one you sent us for identification, and some Two Spotted Stink Bugs are red in color.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Pretty Mystery Beetles
Geographic location of the bug:  Unknown
Date: 05/11/2018
Time: 12:32 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  A friend who is a collector was gifted this by a friend, and before I go on, I just want to specify that the friend who collects always makes sure the creatures died naturally, or humanely if not naturally (ie severely deformed & no quality of life, euthanized humanely etc), and is an animal lover, but as this was gifted to him, he is unsure of its origins in this instance, but I hope that does not dissuade you from identifying these fascinatingly beautiful beetles if possible…
How you want your letter signed:  Pam

Shield Bugs in decorative Mounting

Dear Pam,
These are not beetles.  They are Shield Bugs in the order Scutellaridae.  Without a country of origin, it will be difficult to determine an exact species, but they do resemble the individual in this FlickR posting that be believe was taken in Portugal.  The decorative presentation is reminiscent of Victorian displays.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Need a a bug identified
Geographic location of the bug:  Unoted States
Date: 02/10/2018
Time: 07:17 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I purchased a motorhome and it is infested with these bugs,  can you please help?
How you want your letter signed:  Michelle

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug

Dear Michelle,
The invasive Brown Marmorated Stink Bug, a species native to Asia, has naturalized throughout much of North America in the last decade.  Brown Marmorated Stink Bugs often seek shelter indoors to hibernate when weather begins to cool.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  A mystery Shield Bug in Costa Rica
Geographic location of the bug:  San Ramon, Costa Rica
Date: 01/20/2018
Time: 01:01 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found this bug in a bromeliad leaf. It’s so pretty and I wanted to find out what he was. Thanks!
How you want your letter signed:  Irene Dickinson

Shield Bug

Dear Irene,
This really is a beautiful Shield Bug in the family Scutellaridae, and it is quite apparent why in parts of the world, Shield Bugs are called Jewel Bugs, notably Australia, as this Queensland Museum posting indicates.  Alas we were not having any luck locating images online of white Shield Bugs from Costa Rica, so we turned to our own archives where we have an image posted of a Spotted Shield Bug,
Pachycoris torridus, from Costa Rica that looks similar but is quite different in both colors and markings.  We thought perhaps your individual might be in the same genus.  We were actually shocked to learn it is the same species, based on this image from Project Noah.  According to Neotropical Entomology there is much variation in both colors and markings for this species.

Shield Bug

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination