Currently viewing the category: "Stink Bugs and Shield Bugs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Green beetle?
Location: Honolulu, Hawaii
January 5, 2017 3:17 am
This bug was on my ceiling. It was difficult to pry off (felt like ripping off velcro) and appeared to have green insides, despite being originally brown/gray in color.
Signature: Kristin

Stink Bug

Dear Kristin,
This is NOT a beetle.  It is a Stink Bug in the family Pentatomidae, and we are uncertain of the species.

Thank you Daniel for responding to me so quickly! Do I need to be concerned about this stink bug? As in do they bite or feed on blood or did he just kind of accidentally get into my house and his food source is more outside? If that makes sense..
Kristin

Hi again Kristin,
While we admit that Stink Bugs might be capable of biting a person, that would not be a normal occurrence.  There are some Predatory Stink Bugs that feed on other insects, most Stink Bugs have mouths adapted to piercing the surface of plants and sucking the fluids they find in the stems, leaves, blossoms and fruits.

Hi Daniel,
Oh wow that’s interesting! Thank you so much again for the information! Take care!
Kristin

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unusual pink bug in Johannesburg South Africa
Location: South Africa, Johannesburg
January 4, 2017 1:24 pm
Hi, love your site thank you for the interesting and informative info you post. I live in the country side just outside Johannesburg, South Africa. It is mid summer here and my son noticed this very unusual bug on the wall in the house. At first we thought it was one bug which had a an upper pink portion with a black end disguised to look like a head too but when we out it in a bottle to take it outside we noticed that it was in fact two bugs and the pink bug was pushing a half digested black. If out its anterior end! Can’t find any info on this and was hoping you could tell is what this bug is?
Signature: Tracy

Newly Metamorphosed Brown Marmorated Stink Bug

Dear Tracy,
The albino-like coloration of this Brown Marmorated Stink Bug is an indication that it just emerged from its cast off nymphal exoskeleton.  The Brown Marmorated Stink Bug is an invasive, exotic species originally from Asia that has spread across North America in a very short period of time.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug ID
Location: Rancho Cucamonga, CA
December 14, 2016 3:35 pm
Mr. Bugman;
These guys showed up a couple of weeks ago and number in the thousands.
Can you tell me what it is? Of course you can! You’re the Bugman!
Signature: Jimi Streets

African Cluster Bug

African Cluster Bug

Dear Jimi Streets,
Though we immediately recognized your insect as a Stink Bug in the family Pentatomidae, we did not recognize the species, but that changed as soon as we located this image of an African Cluster Bug,
Agonoscelis puberula, on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide, the range is “mostly sw US (BG data) native to e. & so. Africa, introduced and established in the New World (so. US, Mexico, West Indies) since ca. 1985” and “earliest record in our area: AZ 1990.”  Your submission represents a new species on our site unless this posting from just last month turns out to truly be an African Cluster Bug.  According to Texas Invasives:  “Agonoscelis puberula are usually found in large groups and are rarely found individually or in pairs. It is an important indication if one has been located because there are likely hundreds more nearby. An individual seed of horehound may contain a cluster of 30 adult African Cluster Bugs.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Found a weird bug apparently struggling
Location: Guanajuato México
December 11, 2016 1:08 pm
I live right on the middle of Mexico and i found this guy in my patio. It’s trying to get up, i helped him a couple times but i dont know if there is something wrong with his legs or what he may be needing, never seen this before, maybe family with chinches? He must be the size of my thumb
Signature: Intriguedly yours

Stink Bug

Stink Bug

Try as we might, we have been unable to find a visual match to your Stink Bug in the family Pentatomidae online.  Perhaps one of our readers will have better luck with an identification to the genus or species level.

Karl Identifies Stink Bug
Hi Daniel and Intriguedly yours:
It looks like Edessa sp.; probably E. reticulata. Edessa is a very large genus with many similar species, but I think E. reticulata is a pretty close match to the posted image. Regards, Karl

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What kind of bug is this?
Location: Southern California, USA
December 7, 2016 10:56 pm
Hello, I live in Southern California, and these little critters have been sneaking into my house every once in a while. I think it is some type of beetle, but I’m just not sure, so I wanted to get a second opinion!
Signature: Bree

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug

Dear Bree,
The Brown Marmorated Stink Bug is an Invasive Exotic species that was accidentally introduced to North America in 1998 when it was first found in Maryland.  It has since spread across North America.  In addition to being an agricultural pest that feeds on hundreds of different plant species, it is a nuisance when it enters homes to hibernate when the weather begins to cool.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Chinese bug
Location: Anshun, China
November 20, 2016 10:50 pm
Saw this bug in Anshun, China in October. Cicadas were singing but this was the only bug I could find. Thanks for keeping up this great site.
Signature: Mark

Stink Bug

Shield Bug

Dear Mark,
This is a Stink Bug or Shield Bug in the superfamily Pentatomoidea, but alas, we have not found a conclusive visual match online.  Perhaps one of our readers will have better luck with a species identification.

Identification Courtesy of Karl
Hello Daniel and Mark:
I believe your bug is in a related family, the Shield Bugs (Acanthosomatidae). The genus is probably Acanthosoma, and it looks very similar to A. labiduroides. Since it lacks the long tail projections that are typical for males, I would say it is a female. Regards. Karl

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination