Currently viewing the category: "Stink Bugs and Shield Bugs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  bug identification
Geographic location of the bug:  northern Nevada
Date: 08/14/2019
Time: 01:18 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  These came in a couple of days ago and now they’re everywhere.
How you want your letter signed:  Harold

Immature Conchuela Bug

Dear Harold,
This is an immature Stink Bug called the Conchuela Bug,
Chlorochroa ligata.  Here is an image from BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “prefers fleshy fruits of various plants, especially agarita, balsam-gourd and mesquite; also on sage, yucca, mustards, prickly pear (Opuntia), and various crops (cotton, alfalfa, corn, sorghum, grapes, peas, tomatoes, etc.); primarily a seed feeder preferring leguminous plants (once mesquite beans dry, the bugs move to more succulent plants). many observed, including likely eggs and nymphs, on allthorn (Koeberlinia spinosa).”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Pink aphid like bug
Geographic location of the bug:  Oakville, Ontario, Canada
Date: 08/03/2019
Time: 10:15 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found this guy at the top of my milkweed plant on August 2nd 2019. It’s beautiful. What is it?
How you want your letter signed:  Linda

Predatory Stink Bug nymph

Hi Linda,
Are you by chance growing milkweed to encourage Monarch butterflies?  If you are, you might want to consider relocating this beneficial Predatory Stink Bug nymph away from your milkweed as they have been documented feeding on Monarch Caterpillars.

That would explain why my monarch caterpillars keep disappearing. I have found 3 dead and about 10 just went missing. It’s been very disappointing.
Thanks for the info. I will move the bug to the front garden.
Thank you very much for the information.
Linda

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Round black beetle with white margin and 6 white spots on rear of abdomen
Geographic location of the bug:  Reno NV foothills 6000’ elevation
Date: 08/01/2019
Time: 02:00 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  These smallish round beatles have surprised us by coming into the house by the dozens.  Never saw them before. They are in scattered locations, mostly on the floor, and I don’t move much, but can move slowly or rather quickly if disturbed. I can’t figure out what they want or what they eat. Several are on the doorstep, anxious to come in if the door is opened.
They are round black beetles with white margin and 6 white spots on rear of abdomen.
How you want your letter signed:  Carolyn

Conchuela Stink Bug Nymph

Dear Carolyn,
This is not a Beetle.  It is an immature Stink Bug, and based on this BugGuide image, it is in the genus
Chlorochroa, probably the Conchuela Stink Bug.  According to BugGuide:  “prefers fleshy fruits of various plants, especially agarita, balsam-gourd and mesquite; also on sage, yucca, mustards, prickly pear (Opuntia), and various crops (cotton, alfalfa, corn, sorghum, grapes, peas, tomatoes, etc.); primarily a seed feeder preferring leguminous plants (once mesquite beans dry, the bugs move to more succulent plants). “

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Red and black striped stink bug
Geographic location of the bug:  Montenegro
Date: 07/26/2019
Time: 07:04 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Thought you might like to know we found this guy in Montenegro Kotor Bay
How you want your letter signed:  Frangipanimoonflower

Striped Bug

Dear Frangipanimoonflower,
According to iNaturalist, this boldly colored and marked Stink Bug,
Graphosoma lineatum, is commonly called a Striped Bug or Minstrel Bug.  The site states:  “The orange and black warning colours (aposematism) indicate that the insects are foul-tasting, protecting them from predators. The nymphs do not have the orange-black stripe pattern, instead they are mostly brownish.”

Ed. Note:  We thought we needed to do additional research on the name Minstrel Bug, and we have decided upon further reflection to change the name of both the subject line of this posting and the caption on the image to Striped Bug.  A minstrel is, according to Merriam-Webster:  “one of a class of medieval musical entertainers especially : a singer of verses to the accompaniment of a harp wandering minstrels,”  but a more recent meaning entered the language with this definition:  “a member of a type of performance troupe caricaturing black performers that originated in the U.S. in the early 19th century.  NOTE: The acts of minstrels, who typically performed in blackface, featured exaggerated and inaccurate representations of black people in songs, dances, and comic dialogue. The popularity of minstrel shows in their heyday played a significant role in promoting negative racial stereotypes. Professional minstrel shows had fallen out of favor and effectively disappeared by the mid-20th century.”  What really interested us was how the black and red stripes of the Striped Bug related to minstrel costumes, and our initial searching located this image with a fascinating reversal of a racially insensitive representation of the other on the National Carnival Commission of Trinidad and Tobago where this statement is posted:  “Minstrel of old sang plantation songs and other American songs like ‘Swanee River’ and dressed in a variety of costumes e.g. Uncle Sam tailcoat, pinstripe trousers, white gloves and felt top hat.”  To add further confusion to the common name Minstrel Bug, this insect is European, and we can’t imagine how a decidedly American negative stereotype came to be used for the name of a European insect.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Green Beetle
Geographic location of the bug:  Nanaimo, Vancouver Island
Date: 07/05/2019
Time: 11:17 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I would like to know what this green beetle in my garden is. Saw it July 4, 2019. Is it a fig beetle? I do have fig trees a few feet away.
How you want your letter signed:  Kim Goldberg

Conchuela Bug

Dear Kim,
This is not a Figeater, nor is it any other Beetle.  It is a Stink Bug in the family Pentatomidae, and based on BugGuide images, we believe it is a Conchuela Bug,
Chlorochroa ligata.  According to BugGuide:  “prefers fleshy fruits of various plants, especially agarita, balsam-gourd and mesquite; also on sage, yucca, mustards, prickly pear (Opuntia), and various crops (cotton, alfalfa, corn, sorghum, grapes, peas, tomatoes, etc.); primarily a seed feeder preferring leguminous plants (once mesquite beans dry, the bugs move to more succulent plants). “

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Insect attached to caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  Macon, Ga
Date: 06/19/2019
Time: 07:44 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Was curious what this insect is?
How you want your letter signed:  Evan S. Thomas

Giant Strong Nosed Stink Bug nymph eats Tussock Moth Caterpillar

Dear Evan,
Though most Stink Bugs feed on plants, those in the subfamily Asopinae, the Predatory Stink Bugs, prey on other insects and arthropods.  We quickly identified this Strong Nosed Stink Bug nymph,
Alcaeorrhynchus grandis, thanks to images posted to BugGuide.  The prey is a Tussock Moth Caterpillar.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination