Currently viewing the category: "Seed Bugs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Red bugs in WLA
Location: WLA,: University High School
January 16, 2017 11:43 pm
We found these bugs congregating on a vine near University High School in WLA today. They like the pod like fruit of the vine. There seem to be various stages of development of this bug all living together. Could not see any damage to the vine or fruit/pod of the vine though.
Signature: Margee & Des

Large Milkweed Bugs

Dear Margee & Des,
The insects are various stages of immature nymphs and a single, winged adult Large Milkweed Bug, and finding them on the vine indicates it is either a member of the milkweed family or that it has sticky white sap.  Large Milkweed Bugs are sometimes found on oleander.  They are generally found on the seed pods of milkweed, and they do not do significant harm to the plants, but may effect the number of viable seeds produced.

Thank you so very much for your quick response. We had never seen this bug before and were really curious. Appreciate your effort! 🙂 🙂

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Found multi color bug which I’ve never seen before
Location: South Texas
January 5, 2017 4:47 pm
Hello! Today whilst looking around my yard I saw a yellow, red/orange and black bug which I’ve never seen before around my fence and near the ground. From what I could tell they had 6 legs, 2 antenae and had weird patterns etched to their backs. The larger one had more black whilst the smaller ones were more yellow (not sure if they are the same species). They all seemed to be close together as shown in the picture.
Though it’s winter at the moment, they are very mild and usually never reach below freezing even when a cold front approaches.
-Sorry if the picture is not a close up shot, it was the best I could do.
Thanks for your time and dedication!
Signature: Agon

Six Spotted Milkweed Bugs

Dear Agon,
You high resolution image is perfectly fine for identifying these Six Spotted Milkweed Bugs,
Oncopeltus sexmaculatus, a species that according to BugGuide is “Similar to Large Milkweed Bug, but with a red head, and a slightly different spot pattern.”  Based on BugGuide data, Six Spotted Milkweed Bugs are only reported from Texas within the United States, and your submission represents a new species for our site.  Your image depicts both winged adults and wingless, more yellow nymphs.

Six Spotted Milkweed Bugs

Six Spotted Milkweed Bugs

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this bug
Location: Ontario, canada
November 6, 2016 12:36 pm
It is black and red.
Signature: Karen

Small Milkweed Bug

Small Milkweed Bug

Dear Karen,
This is a Small Milkweed Bug.  It is a native species for you an no cause for concern.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Garden bug swarms
Location: Sioux Falls SD 57106
October 2, 2016 3:43 pm
My moms curios whats happening in her city flower garden. Sioux falls, SD. Late sept to early oct. On butterfly plants only that are seeding. One plant has larger bugs not afraid of humans. Those are easy to photograph she said. Another plant 8 feet away has small bugs very skitterish hard to get close photo. This plant also has 1 large boxelder looking bug babysitting i think.
Signature: Michael J Theesfeld

Large Milkweed Bug nymphs

Large Milkweed Bug nymphs

Dear Michael,
All the images you submitted depict Large Milkweed Bug nymphs in various stages of development, however, there are no fully winged adult Large Milkweed Bugs,
Oncopeltus fasciatus, evident in the images.  According to BugGuide both nymphs and adults feed on  “Seeds of milkweed plants” and “In the course of feeding these bugs accumulate toxins from the milkweed, which can potentially sicken any predators foolish enough to ignore the bright colors which warn of their toxicity.”

Large Milkweed Bug Nymphs

Large Milkweed Bug Nymphs

Thank you for the prompt and informative reply its much appreciated.  God Bless.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Can’t identify this bug
Location: Eastern San Francisco bay area California
September 30, 2016 8:17 pm
Good day,
Found this big swimming in a child’s pool I use for my siberian husky. The husky had a severe allergic reaction to an insect bite, and I found this critter while trying to find what could have bite the husky. Thing it is of the leaf foot verity but not sure. Any thoughts?
Signature: Shawn

Mediterranean Seed Bug

Mediterranean Seed Bug

Dear Shawn,
This is an invasive Mediterranean Seed Bug,
Xanthochilus saturnius, a species that according to BugGuide is:  “native to Europe and the Mediterranean, adventive in NA (WA-CA) and now locally abundant.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Household insect with strange thick parts of legs
Location: New Jersey
July 22, 2016 11:21 pm
Hello,
I have seen these insects twice in my apartment in suburbia lately. One much smaller than this, about a centimeter long, and then this one, which was about 3 centimeters in length.
Sorry the photo is slightly blurry, but I hope you can see the shape. I know it’s not a roach, the back isn’t the right shape. I don’t think it’s a beetle. I am perplexed outside of that though: it has these thickenings near its joints in its legs that remind me of bees, and a head that reminds me of that, too, but it doesn’t have the hemiptera waist. My best guess is a true bug, but that’s pretty vague!
I tried to grab it so I could look at its mouth parts, but it intelligently moved away.
Signature: Sylvia

Long Necked Seed Bug

Long Necked Seed Bug

Dear Sylvia,
This is a Long Necked Seed Bug,
Myodocha serripes, a species that according to BugGuide:  “overwinters in woodlands, migrating to fields in spring/summer; adults attracted to lights” and “Sometimes a pest of strawberries.”  We love your dedication to learning its identity, including trying to see its mouth parts. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination