Currently viewing the category: "Seed Bugs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  insects on milkweed plants
Geographic location of the bug:  Manhattan Beach, CA
Date: 11/05/2017
Time: 12:36 PM EDT
What is it?   Have never seen it before in 20 years at this location.   Is it beneficial or a bit of a problem? These plants also get hit by yellow aphids – I am hoping these red and black beauties eat aphids
How you want your letter signed:  Sue Randolph

Large Milkweed Bugs: Adults and Nymphs

Dear Sue,
These are Large Milkweed Bugs, and they will not harm your milkweed plants, but they do feed on the seeds and seed pods, which does not harm the plant, but will reduce the number of viable seeds for next year.  Like many insects that feed on milkweed, Large Milkweed Bugs have aposomatic or warning coloration.  Large Milkweed Bugs are also reported to feed on oleander.  Many True Bugs that feed on plants are also reported to feed on smaller insects, and we would love to fantasize that Large Milkweed Bugs might occasionally feed on Oleander Aphids.

Large Milkweed Bugs

Thank you –  I will let them enjoy themselves 🙂

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Would love to is this bug
Geographic location of the bug:  Eastern panhandle of WV
Date: 10/22/2017
Time: 11:06 AM EDT
This bug is in a large grouping in my raised bed which not has leaf litter and many dying zinnias. There is also parsley in the area.
How you want your letter signed:  Sandra

Milkweed Bug Nymphs

Dear Sandra,
These are immature Seed Bugs in the family Lygaeidae, and immature individuals can be difficult to identify conclusively.  Was there any milkweed near where they were found?  These look like Milkweed Bug nymphs to us, but we cannot state for certain if they are Small Milkweed Bug nymphs,
Lygaeus kalmii, which are pictured on BugGuide, or Large Milkweed Bug nymphs, Oncopeltus fasciatus, which are also pictured on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Bug identification
Geographic location of the bug:  Lonavala, Pune District, Maharashtra, India
Date: 10/06/2017
Time: 12:35 AM EDT
I found this bug on 16th september, 2017. Looks similar to Indian Milkweed Bug. But I am not sure about the ID. YOur help is appreciated.
Thanks
How you want your letter signed:  Girish Ketkar

Unknown Seed Bug

Dear Girish,
This is definitely a True Bug in the suborder Heteroptera, but it does not look like a Milkweed Bug to us.  We found this stock photo image on Shutterstock that really looks like your bug, and it is identified as the Indian Milkweed Bug,
Oncopeltus confusus, but when we looked up that species on Insects in Indian Agroecosystems, it appears to identify a different species than the one on Shutterstock, so we are presuming Shutterstock is wrong.  In our opinion, it looks more (but not exactly) like Thunbergia sanguinarius in the Seed Bug family Lygaeidae which is also pictured on Insects in Indian Agroecosystems.

Unknown Seed Bug

Dear Sir,
Thanks a lot for the detailed reply.
Girish
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  They are everywhere!
Geographic location of the bug:  My Basement, northeast Washington state
Date: 09/28/2017
Time: 12:48 AM EDT
What are these? Are they harmful?
How you want your letter signed:  Creeped Out

Mediterranean Seed Bug

Dear Creeped Out,
This is an invasive Mediterranean Seed Bug, and according to BugGuide:  “native to Europe and the Mediterranean, adventive in NA (WA-CA) and now locally abundant.”  Without natural predators on the west coast of North America, they are proliferating.  Though they are not specifically harmful, they are an annoyance when they are abundant, and we don’t believe there is any current information on the negative impact they might have on native species.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Black & Orange Banded w/Red Head
Geographic location of the bug:  Tulsa, Ok
Date: 09/26/2017
Time: 10:34 AM EDT
I’ve seen photos of the Banded Net-Wing Beetle, but all of those have a black head. This bug has a red head. Is it different or maybe a different gender?
How you want your letter signed:  Gloria Famer

Large Milkweed Bug

Dear Gloria,
While your critter resembles a Banded Net-Winged Beetle,
it is a different species.  As a matter of fact, it is not even a beetle.  This is a Large Milkweed Bug, Oncopeltus fasciatus, a species almost always found on milkweed.  Since Large Milkweed Bugs have mouths designed to pierce and suck, not to chew, the eaten leaf can be attributed to something else.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Please identify this bug
Location: Irvine, CA
August 22, 2017 1:33 pm
This bug is hanging out on my milkweed plant. Please help me identify it so I can get rid of it.
Thank you!
Signature: Marta Rosener

Large Milkweed Bug and Oleander Aphids

Dear Marta,
The large insect in your image is a Large Milkweed Bug, and though they suck juices from plants, they feed mainly on the seeds and seed pods which will reduce the number of viable seeds produced by the plant, but it will not harm the plant.  The tiny, yellow Oleander Aphids are another story and they are injurious to the young shoots of your milkweed plants, but it also appears that the Large Milkweed Bug might be feeding on the Aphids.  According to BugGuide:  “In the course of feeding these bugs accumulate toxins from the milkweed, which can potentially sicken any predators foolish enough to ignore the bright colors which warn of their toxicity.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination