Currently viewing the category: "Red Bugs"
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Are these insects Beetles ?
January 3, 2010
I spotted these insects jointly gathered in
a backside of a small plant leaf.
Hari Iyer
Thane, Maharashtra, India

Unknown Immature True Bugs from India

Unknown Immature True Bugs from India

Dear Hari Iyer,
These are not beetles, but rather True Bugs in the order Hemiptera.  They are immature specimens that will become winged adults.  We are not certain of the species.

Update and Correction from Eric Eaton
January 9, 2010
Daniel:
The unknown immature true bugs from India are nymphs of “cotton stainers” in the genus Dysdercus, family Pyrrhocoridae.  Nice pictures.
Eric

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Red Insect with ‘shield’ markings
December 7, 2009
I saw these insects while on holiday. They stood out due to their impressive markings. I’d really like to know what they are.
Russell Brown
Providenciales, Turks and Caicos Islands

Aggregation of St. Andrew's Cotton Stainers

Aggregation of St. Andrew's Cotton Stainers

Dear Russell,
These are Cotton Stainers, most likely St. Andrew’s Cotton Stainers, Dysdercus andreae.  According to BugGuide, they are native to the West Indies.  They are often found in large aggregations like this with winged adults and wingless nymphs.  BugGuide also indicates:  “The feeding activities of cotton stainers on cotton produce a stain on the lint which reduces its value. A few authorities have reported the stain comes from excrement of the bugs. However, most have stated that the stain primarily is a result of the bug puncturing the seeds in the developing bolls causing a juice to exude that leaves an indelible stain. Feeding by puncturing flower buds or young cotton bolls usually causes reduction in size, or the fruiting body may abort and drop to the ground.” – University of Florida.

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Id help needed – pretty bugs!
November 21, 2009
I photographed these bugs on butterfly holiday in the USA in Nov 2006. There were seen at the Westlaco Valley Nature reserve in the Lower Rio Grande Valley, Texas. As I live in England I don’t have any suitable field guides and wondered if someone can Id these for me.
Maris UK
LRGV Texas

Pale Red Bugs Mating

Pale Red Bugs Mating

Hi Maris,
This is a new species for our website, but we quickly identified your mating Pale Red Bugs or Turk’s Cap Bugs, Dysdercus concinnus, on BugGuide.  The Rio Grande Valley in Texas is the northernmost reach of the range of the species which is found in Central America south to Columbia.

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red bug taking over my yard
October 10, 2009
This bug is invading my yard. They are multipiling like crazy. So far they are just eating weeds. But what happens when they run out. I have chickens they wont eat them, and for that reason Idont want to use poisons. I believe this is a new bug to this area and I think its going to take over.
Kim
Perris,Ca

Red Bug Aggregation

Red Bug Aggregation

Hi Kim,
Interestingly, these really are Red Bugs.  The species, Scantius aegyptius, is not native, and according to BugGuide, has only been reported from California.  It does not have a common name, but is in the family Pyrrhocoridae, the Red Bugs.  The UC Riverside Website lists its origin as the Mediterranean.  The UC Riverside Website states:  “Scantius aegyptius, an old world pyrrhocorid bug, native to the eastern Mediterranean region, was documented for the first time in North America in Orange County during June of 2009.  Reports of this insect from other southern California locations (i.e., Riverside County) suggest that this insect has been established for a year or more prior to these Orange County collections.
”  The website also indicates:  “Damage: The literature contains very little information regarding the biology of S. aegyptius and Scantius species in general are not considered to be economically important species.  In California, Scantius has been observed feeding on the developing seeds and stems of Knotweed (Polygonum spp.) and Malva (Malva parviflora).  It is likely that S. aegyptius will feed on the seeds of several species of annual herbaceous plants.  The most noticeable impact of S. aegyptius in California will likely be the presence of large numbers of nymphs and adults migrating from drying annual weeds into adjacent developed areas.  These migrations consisting of thousands of individuals can be very conspicuous and lead to large aggregations on small patches of host plants causing concern to local residents who notice these obvious aggregations.

Red Bugs

Red Bugs

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Bugs of the caribean Island Antigua
Hallo,
these bugs i found on the carribean Island Antigua. I think it belongs to the Pyrrhocoridae.
Christian

Hi again Christian,
We agree with you that these true bugs are in the Red Bug family Pyrrhocoridae.

Update:  January 22, 2017
St Andrew’s Cross Cotton StainersThanks to a comment, we are confident that these are , a species we have identified on our site numerous times since this posting.

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Would you identify these bugs? I live in S.W.France. Are they harmful to the lime tree that they have infested? if so, how do I get rid of them? Many thanks for your help.
Michael Warrack

Hi Michael,
I am not as familiar with French insects, but it appears you have an aggregation of Seed Bugs, Family Lygaeidae, of some sort, possibly a type of French Milkweed Bug. Seed Bugs are True Bugs and most suck juices from developing or dry seeds or the sap of grasses. They are known to form aggregations, sometimes to hibernate. My best guess is that they are not harming your lime tree, but using it as a gathering site.

Update: (07/28/2008) Species ID for “Maybe French Milkweed Bugs” pic
Hi there!
I’ve been a fan of your site for some time now. I used to live in central Florida and your site was an invaluable resource in helping me identify all manner of insects while I was there…during that time, I sent you a couple photos I’d taken of insects in that area. (I don’t think any of them made it onto the site, but then, I wasn’t actually requesting IDs for the pictured species and I know you’re inundated with requests, so I didn’t really have any expectation in that regard.) I have since moved to Brno, Czech Republic, and am now encountering a very different (but no less interesting) selection of creatures. Anyway, on to the point of this message! While browsing your site recently, I noticed the photo under the heading “Maybe French Milkweed Bugs”, which was submitted by a reader in France…I thought I’d send an email because I think I can help with its identification. The picture in question appears near the top of your first page of true bugs. I suspect the species pictured is Pyrrhocoris apterus, commonly known as a “firebug”. I have seen aggregations of them here in Brno, as well, especially during their mating season in mid-Spring. The information I’ve found indicates that this species is fairly prevalent throughout central and southern Europe. The fact that the submitter of the photo mentioned that they were found on a lime tree supports this identification, as well, as lime tree seeds are one of their primary food sources. Thanks for all the effort you put into the site, keep up the good work!
Sharon

Hi Sharon,
Thanks for catching this and bringing it to our attention. We have subsequently identified Firebugs on later postings, but we didn’t realize we had an old letter still listed as unidentified. We also apologize for never posting your photos. At times we are inumdated with mail.

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