Currently viewing the category: "Plant Bugs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Red and black shelled bug
Thu, Mar 19, 2009 at 2:11 PM
We live in San Antonio, Texas. Since early March, we have been noticing these strange bugs crawling around near our back porch and in our back garden. They’ve been hanging out on our nascent basil bush, though they don’t seem to have actually nibbled a the basil yet. (Perhaps they don’t like pesto?) Does anyone know what these pesky creatures might be called? What environmentally responsible steps can we take to remove them from our premises?
Aaron
San Antonio, Texas

Red Shouldered Bugs

Red Shouldered Bugs

Dear Aaron,
The most puzzling aspect of your photo of mating Red Shouldered Bugs, Jadera haematoloma, is that the female does not appear to have fully developed wings. This indicates that she is still an immature nymph. Red Shouldered Bugs may be a nuisance when they appear in large aggregations, but they will not harm the plants in your garden. According to BugGuide, it is found in: “yards and gardens, often in large aggregations to feed on seeds that have dropped to the ground from trees overhead ” and “”J. haematoloma feeds on a variety of plants but prefers balloonvine (Cardiospermum spp.; Sapindaceae) which grows in southern Florida. Additional hosts include other Sapindaceae, Ficus spp. (Moraceae) and Althaea spp. (Malvaceae). In some areas the bugs are observed feeding so often on goldenrain tree seeds ( Koelreuteria spp.; Sapindaceae), that they are referred to as ‘goldenrain tree bugs’.” – Frank Mead and Thomas Fasulo, University of Florida .” The species is also known as the Golden Rain Tree Bug because of its association with that plant. We do not offer extermination advice, especially with regards to benign species. We will contact Eric Eaton to see if he has an opinion on the underage female involved in mating activity.

Update: Fri, 20 Mar 2009 10:39:27 -0700 (PDT)
Hi, Daniel:
Many members of the “true bugs” suborder Heteroptera exhibit what scientists call “polymorphism” when it comes to wing growth.  Some individuals or populations will have shortened or otherwise non-functional wings while others will be fully-winged.  I’ve never heard of Jadera displaying that phenomenon, but I’m also not surprised by it.
Eric
P.S.  Did I tell you I’m blogging now?  Feel free to link to anything there that you might find useful, or even reprint it on WTB:
http://bugeric.blogspot.com

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Red and black large group of beetles?
Fri, Oct 24, 2008 at 9:30 PM
Hello,
As the weather has gotten colder over the past few weeks I started to notice two or three of these guys warming themselves in the sun on my front door. As time went on, more and more showed up, and now as many as 15 or 20 will show up on the front of my house.
A few days ago I was raking leaves in my backyard and came upon this rock with a huge group of them huddled together. Further investigation found other groups of them on other nearby rocks, trees, and piles of dead leaves. What are they?
I live in northern KY, just south of Cincinnati Ohio. They didn’t seem to appear (I didn’t notice them anyway) until the first part of September this year.
Gratefully
KY, USA

Democrat Bug Aggregation

Democrat Bug Aggregation

Hi Kentucky,
These are not beetles. Beetles go through complete metamorphosis so the larvae look nothing like the adult. These are Eastern Boxelder Bugs, Boisea trivittata, and since they have incomplete metamorphosis, the nymphs resemble the adults, but without the wings. Boxelder Bugs sometimes form large aggregations, and they are often noticed in the fall as cold weather starts to set in because they are known to seek shelter indoors. They will also emerge on warm sunny days in areas with southern exposures. Though they are associated with boxelder and maple trees, they really don’t do any harm to the trees since the nymphs feed on the juices of the seeds. According to BugGuide, they are also called: “Democrat Bug, Populist Bug, Politician Bug. Apparently these political terms are primarily used in the Central Plains states as I’ve seen references to such from KAN, NEB, & IOWA. (MQ) .” Though your photo does not show quite as many individuals as those gathering at a Barack Obama rally, they are nonetheless quite numerous. Your photo is a wonderful example of the great new feature on our website since our recent site migration. By clicking on the small image, you will see a much larger version open in a new window.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Boxelder bugs.
Hi folks!
Two pictures, one of Boxelder Bugs (Boisea trivittata) mating for your Bug love page, and one of a box elder nymph. Sending you the full sized pics so you may crop as needed. They’re also called Garage Bugs, and oddly enough, these bugs were on my garage door!
Cheryl-Anne Miller

Hi Cheryl-Anne,
Thanks for contributing to our Boxelder Bug archive.

Comment: (07/02/2008) THANK YOU..
hahah im so glad you guys answered the boxelder bug question 9078787697867657956 times. i spent all day trying to figure out what they were to see if they were harmful and your site is the only one that helped me.
p.s. im also glad you don’t offer extermination advice. i love bugs. keep up the good work guys.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

What’s this bug?
This beetle, found in the Sacramento area of California, appears diurnal, and heat tolerant. Most plentiful in May & June. What am I looking at?
Doc

Hi Doc,
This isn’t a beetle. It is a true bug, one of the Bordered Plant Bugs, Largus californicus. You can see matching images on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Can you identify these?
They showed up in our neighborhood about 4 years ago, and are prolific breeders. Their young resemble “large” aphids with orange-ish red abdomens. The adults have the same orange/red abdomen that is exposed when they take flight. In the picture attached, I believe the smaller one (on the left) is the male mating with a female. Your help would be greatly appreciated.
Ron

Hi Ron,
The Boxelder Bug, Boisea trivittata, is one of our most frequent query subjects due to the mass aggregations they form. Though they may be a nuisance when they appear in large numbers, they are not harmful to you or your home. Your mating couple is a nice addition to our site.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Unidentified Critter
Dear Sirs:
Any idea about this little critter. They are tearing up my Russian Sage, Cat Mint and other flowering plants. Helping to identify the bug would obviously help in seeking a solution, but to date I have been unsuccessful in placing a name on the critter. Thanks.
Jonathan

Hi Jonathan,
You never provided us with a location, and since we didn’t know if you were in North Carolina, England or Singapore, we could not take the time to research your query. Luckily for you, Helen wrote in the next day and let us know that her Four Lined Plant Bugs, Poecilocapsus lineatus, were eating the sage in her Virginia garden. Armed with the knowledge that this insect was North American, we quickly identified it.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination