Currently viewing the category: "Plant Bugs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

what kind of bug is this?
December 23, 2009
I would like to find out what kind of bug we found in our back porch. It was found In oregon during September, by itself outside on a warm cloudy day. Specifically we are in the mid willamette Valey about 1 mile from Willamette River. We are in a rural area
Josh Hoffert
Independence, OR. Mid willamette Valley. 1 mile from the river.

Western Boxelder Bug

Western Boxelder Bug

Hi Josh,
This is a Western Boxelder Bug, Boisea rubrolineata, a benign creature that often forms large aggregations and enters homes to hibernate as cooler weather approaches.  It can become a nuisance if it gets too plentiful.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

red bugs taking over my yard
December 8, 2009
I have red and black bugs that seem to mulitply by the day. I tried poison but it did not work. Maybe it was the wrong poison but don’t know what to get because I don’t know what the bug is. Please help, they reproduce faster than rabbits!
Afton
Orlando Florida

Red Shoulder Bug Aggregation

Red Shoulder Bug Aggregation

Hi Afton,
You have an aggregation of immature Red Shoulder Bugs, Jadera haematoloma, and according to BugGuide, they can emerge in alarmingly large swarms.  Adults have black wings that cover the red abdomens that are visible in the nymphs.   They are also called Goldenrain Tree Bugs because they feed on the seeds of the goldenrain tree.  Another common host plant in Florida is the balloonvine.  BugGuide also indicates that the peak population period in Florida is May.  BugGuide indicates:  “Widespread southern species, in same family as the Boxelder Bug. Often associated with the introduced Goldenrain Tree (Koelreuteria paniculata; family Sapindaceae) but is apparently a native insect.  …. The bug is probably more widespread than formerly, following the distribution of the cultivated tree.”  Red Shoulder Bugs may become a nuisance because of their numbers, but they are benign insects.

Red Shoulder Bugs

Red Shoulder Bugs

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Unknown bug in Saline Michigan during warm fall days
November 9, 2009
Hi Bugman, many of these bugs cover my black front door which faces south. They have managed to slip through the bottom of the door into the house where they tend to creep along the floor more than fly around. It has been very warm here in Michigan (above 50 F and sunnier than usual.
Curious, Lorraine
Saline, Michigan USA

Eastern Boxelder Bug

Eastern Boxelder Bug

Dear Lorraine,
Eastern Boxelder Bugs create tremendous aggregations that may contain thousands of individuals.  They are not considered a harmful insect, though their presence is often an annoyance when they try to enter homes in great numbers in the autumn to escape the winter chill.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Two mystery bugs
September 21, 2009
Bug #1 – Brown, six legged with wings and looks to be a stinger. About 2 inches long. Found dead on our driveway.
Bug #2 – Brown and white spotted bugs with orange spots almost like a lady bug. Found on our althea red heart hibiscus buds.
Heather Korn
West Tennessee

Scentless Plant Bug

Scentless Plant Bug

Hi again Heather,
Bug #2 is a Scentless Plant Bug, Niesthrea louisianica, and it has no common name.  According to BugGuide, it:  “Feeds on flower buds and seeds of plants in the Mallow family (Malvaceae), such as Hibiscus and Rose of Sharon.
”  More importantly, BugGuide also indicates it is:  “Used as a control of the invasive annual weed, Velvetleaf (Abutilon theophrasti). In one 1987 study mentioned here it was found to reduce seed production by 98%.”  The brightly colored immature nymphs in your photo are wingless, but your photo also shows a winged adult, though the individual is not the point of focus in your photograph.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Bug love (Boxelder style)
July 26, 2009
I belive these to be, Boisea trivitata. Having a little fun on my screen. Just outside, is a boxelder tree, where there are thousands more. Can’t tell which is male, and which is female. Can you help?
Terry
Mound, MN

Mating Boxelder Bugs

Mating Boxelder Bugs

Hi Terry,
Thanks for sending us your photo of mating Eastern Boxelder Bugs.  We almost never get submissions from people who know what they are, but rather they want the large congregations of insects in their yards identified.  We are especially fond of some of the alternative names for Eastern Boxelder Bugs, including Democrat Bug, Populist Bug, Politician Bug.  According to BugGuide:  “Apparently these political terms are primarily used in the Central Plains states as I’ve seen references to such from KAN, NEB, & IOWA. “

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Swarm of red/black insects
June 13, 2009
Swarm of red/black insects
• Your letter to the bugman (please provide as much narrative and information as possible)    I have what I would describe as a swarm of red and black insects on the side of my house and my neighbor’s house. There are two distinct looking types. One is larger and more black than red while the other is smaller and is more red than black, and there are tinyred ones I can only assume are babies everywhere.
Nathan Elsener
North Central West Virginia

Boxelder Bug Aggregation

Boxelder Bug Aggregation

Hi Nathan,
Boxelder Bugs like the ones in your photo are one of our most frequently requested identifications.  The Boxelder Bugs frequently form large aggregations of nymphs and adults.  Other than being a nuisance, the Boxelder Bugs are benign.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination