Currently viewing the category: "Box Elder Bugs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Beetle ? Pine Borer ?
Geographic location of the bug:  North New Jersey
Date: 09/01/2017
Time: 05:25 PM EDT
I just cut down 2 large white pine trees a couple months ago. Now I am finding what I swear are 1 million of these bugs on my other trees and in the fallen pine needles.
I dont know if they are harmful to humans, my pets or the other trees, whether they should be left alone, removed somehow.
Any help would be appreciated.
thanks,
How you want your letter signed:  Bob

Eastern Boxelder Bug Nymphs

Dear Bob,
These are Eastern Boxelder Bug nymphs, and although they are harmless, when they are present in large numbers, they can be quite a nuisance.  They are sometimes called Democrat Bugs.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Please identify
Location: Albany NY
July 10, 2017 10:08 am
1/48to 3/8″ long
In fkower bed near Alany NY
First appeared in June. WHole bunches clustered on edging.
Signature: Ann

Eastern Boxelder Bug Nymph

Dear Ann,
This is an immature Eastern Boxelder Bug nymph, and immature individuals are known to aggregate in tremendous numbers with adults, leading to the use of the common name Democrat Bug.  Other similar looking, closely related insects that also form large aggregations include the Western Boxelder Bugs and Red Shouldered Bugs.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: mystery bug
Location: Southern California
June 28, 2017 8:10 am
Hi. Please identify this bug for me. I think it is an actual bug (Hemiptera). Thanks.
Signature: lanny@herbwalks.com

Western Boxelder Bug

Dear Lanny,
This is a Western Boxelder Bug and they are known to form large aggregations when conditions are favorable.

Thanks, Daniel. That was fast! I saw a pic of a boxelder bug on your site and thought it looked similar but we don’t have boxelders growing in this area. Does it feed or host on another Southern California plant?
Lanny Kaufer

Hi Lanny,
According to BugGuide they will feed on many species of maple as well as other trees:  “hosts:
Acer grandifolium (Bigleaf Maple), A. negundo (Boxelder), A. saccharinum (Silver Maple), Koelreuteria paniculata (Goldenrain Tree), and Sapindus saponaria (Western Soapberry)  Flowers and young seeds are preferred, so female trees often support larger populations; may also feed on foliage, on sap seeping from wounds on branches/trunks, and on fallen seeds. They will sometimes feed on trees of the Rose Family (Malus, Pyrus, Prunus, etc.) and cause minor damage to commercial fruit (rarely). They are recorded to feed on plants as diverse as Grass, Alfalfa, and Potatoes. It is even common to see them gathered and sucking fluids from other substances such as discarded human food, smashed insects, etc.”

There are Bigleaf Maples in the creek where this one was seen so that would explain its presence.
Thanks again!
Lanny

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Please identify
Location: Reno NV
March 31, 2017 3:05 pm
Hi,
I moved into a new house in Reno, NV. There’s lots of trees and ground cover. This insect is all over my yard, especially in the ground cover. We saw them a lot in August last year too. Right now they are a little annoying, but I want to know if I need to protect my plants, kids, etc. I’m pretty sure they are a beetle, 2 sets of wings, mainly black, some orange/red marks on the back, red body under the wing, and when they breed they connect with their tail ends and walk around.
Signature: Stephanie

Western Boxelder Bug

Dear Stephanie,
This is a Western Boxelder Bug, and while they can be a nuisance if they are plentiful, they pose no threat to you, your pets, your home or your plants.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug identification
Location: Upstate NY Catskill Mountains
February 23, 2017 11:05 am
In the past 2 weeks, I’ve noticed these bugs crawling around in broad daylight. They resemble a roach but my husband swears it’s not. I see about 10 on any given day. They are seen sporadically anywhere, kitchen floor, living room floor, etc. Never seen on countertops but the thought of bugs in my home gives me the creeps. Could you please help me out here and identify this bug. It started about 2 weeks ago, as the weather has been warming up here in the Catskill Mountains, Upstate, NY.
Signature: Marie

Subject: Bug identification
Location: Upstate NY Catskill Mountains
February 23, 2017 11:28 am
I just recently sent you a inquiry if you could help me identify this bug that we’ve seen more and more in the past 2 weeks. Seems like since the weather got a bit warmer, we’ve suddenly seen this bug. Looks like a cockroach to me, but my husband says it’s not. Other people up here in Upstate New York, Catskill mountains, have also seen them and don’t know what they are. Can you help me out with identifying this pest? Never see them on the kitchen counters, and see about 10 a day in broad daylight. Has six legs and antennae. Dark brownish in color, and I believe they have wings, but I’ve never seen them fly. About 1/4 -1/2 inch in size. Have spotted them throughout our first floor. We do have an unfinished basement that get occasional water from rain. So please see if you can let me know what they are and what I can do to get rid of them. Thanks so much.

Eastern Boxelder Bugs

Dear Marie,
You have Eastern Boxelder Bugs, a species known to form large aggregations outdoors and to seek shelter indoors to hibernate once the weather cools.  Once the weather begins to warm again, the hibernating Eastern Boxelder Bugs become active and attempt to gain egress to the outdoors, at which point they are noticed.  Eastern Boxelder Bugs are harmless, and they will not damage your home, but they can become a nuisance when they are plentiful.

Thank you so much Daniel.  You were a big help.  Not sure how to get rid of them though.  Any ideas?
Marie

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s that bug?
Location: Northeast California, USA
November 29, 2016 11:47 am
Theis big is found in Northeastern California, USA. They are about 1/2 to 3/4 inches in length. Brown/black in color with red-orange marking I got along their backs. They can fly but not far and as they fly the open wings reveal a red body.
They seem to emerge from areas at the bottom of the house walls and are most active on warm days – especially in the spring and early winter ( i.e. Times when we have cool nights and warm days). They seem to nest near the house foundation and are very active on warm days following cold evenings. They seem to find their way into the house around door frames and sliding patio entrances.
What are these bugs? Are they harmful to people, pets or property (i.e. Like termites).? If harmful, is there a ecological control protocol that could discourage these bugs from nesting around the house?
Signature: Trevor

Western Boxelder Bug

Western Boxelder Bug

Dear Trevor,
This is a Western Boxelder Bug,
Boisea rubrolineata, and according to BugGuide:  “Particularly noticeable in fall (often invade homes in search of shelter to hibernate) and in spring (when they emerge).”  We apologize for the very tardy response, but as our automated response states, we have a small staff and we cannot answer all the mail we receive.  We are currently selecting postings to go live to our site when we are away for the holidays, so your submission will go live at the end of the month.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination