Currently viewing the category: "Plant Bugs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Mystery bug in great numbers
Geographic location of the bug:  Houston, TX
Date: 10/21/2018
Time: 02:12 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  These mystery bugs have been found in great numbers in our backyard and behind our fence in a wetland. They don’t fly but crawl all over the place and only appeared after Hurricane Harvey flooded our whole area very badly for an extended time.
The chickens won’t eat them at all, unfortunately. I can’t find them anywhere on the web. Not sure if we should try to eradicate them or if they are harmless.
How you want your letter signed:  KK Rush

Bordered Plant Bugs

Dear KK Rush,
These appear to be Bordered Plant Bugs,
Largus bipustulatus, which are pictured on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide, they are:  “ground-dwelling or associated with the vegetative parts of forbs, shrubs and trees.”

Thank you so much! I swear I dug around all through the ‘net.
I sure wish the chickens would eat them.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  A lot of mating going on
Geographic location of the bug:  Wenatchee, Washington State USA
Date: 03/06/2018
Time: 03:20 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  We have many of these bugs doing the “thing” in our backyard at the moment. We have seen them on occasion over the years but never so many all at once mating.
How you want your letter signed:  Kevin

Western Boxelder Bug

Dear Kevin,
This is a Western Boxelder Bug,
Boisea rubrolineata, and according to BugGuide:  “Particularly noticeable in fall (often invade homes in search of shelter to hibernate) and in spring (when they emerge).” 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Red and Black beetles
Geographic location of the bug:  Corona, CA
Date: 02/18/2018
Time: 03:48 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I have seen these beetles en masse during late winter through mid spring for years and haven’t seen a clear answer in my searches.  There was hundreds of these near the bushes and a downed and mulched tree (although the tree had been taken down quite some time ago).
How you want your letter signed:  KJS

Mating Red Shouldered Bugs

Dear KJS,
These are not beetles.  They are Red Shouldered Bugs,
Jadera haematoloma, and your image depicts both a mating pair and an immature nymph.  According to BugGuide, the habitat is:  “Yards, gardens, riparian areas, and other areas in association with hostplants. Often found in large aggregations feeding on leaking tree sap, dead insects, or seeds that have fallen from trees overhead. Also forms aggregations in winter to hibernate, often in association with human residences.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is this bug?
Geographic location of the bug:  North Carolina
Date: 12/27/2017
Time: 06:59 PM EDT
My nephew found this bug and is very curious about it.
How you want your letter signed:  Deanna Money

Scentless Plant Bug Nymphs

Dear Deanna,
These immature Scentless Plant Bugs,
Niesthrea louisianica, have no species specific common name.  They are frequently found on Rose of Sharon as your image documents.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  bugs on house siding
Geographic location of the bug:  agawam, ma
Date: 11/05/2017
Time: 02:43 PM EDT
tons of these bugs on outside of house. never had them before
How you want your letter signed:  Don Williams

Eastern Boxelder Bug

Dear Don,
This is an Eastern Boxelder Bug, a species that often aggregates in large numbers.  Houses with light colored, south facing walls that are in the sun are favorite locations for aggregating.  Eastern Boxelder Bugs are also known to enter homes to hibernate once weather begins to cool.  The aggregations have led to common names like Populist Bug and Democrat Bug. 

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is this
Geographic location of the bug:  Ohio
Date: 11/05/2017
Time: 09:20 PM EDT
Swarming in Akron
How you want your letter signed:  Aaa

Eastern Boxelder Bug

Dear Aaa,
This is an Eastern Boxelder Bug, sometimes called a Populist Bug or Democrat Bug because of the large number of individuals that aggregate together, often in the autumn on light colored walls with sunny exposures.  Eastern Boxelder Bugs are also known to enter homes to hibernate when the weather begins to cool.  Interestingly, the Western Boxelder Bug is our current Bug of the Month.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination