Currently viewing the category: "True Bugs"

Subject: Bouncing spider?
Location: 90066-2724 Mar Vista CA
May 24, 2016 10:38 pm
My brother noticed this bug on a chunk of wood from the wood pile. We thought it was a spider. He didn’t dart around at all, just mostly bounce up and down. What is it?
Signature: Bouncing Bug

Thread-Legged Bug

Thread-Legged Bug

This appears to be a Thread Legged Bug, one of the predatory Assassin Bugs in the subfamily Emesinae.  You can refer to BugGuide for additional images and information on this fascinating subfamily.

Subject: Unfamiliar True Bug
Location: Chula Vista, California
May 24, 2016 6:02 pm
Hello! First I would like to say I do love this website very much and I frequently visit it for some fun! Now on to my question; in my area there are hundreds upon hundreds of Red Shouldered Bugs running around. But just today (5/24/16), I have noticed a strange dead bug that was obviously a true bug but was not one of those very common Red Shouldered Bugs while I was walking my dog. I didn’t think about it much until I got back home and then I saw a living one in my backyard. It was about 1/2 and inch longer than an adult Red Shouldered Bug with a different pattern. I think it’s some kind of parasitic bug but what I’m hoping is that it is an assassin bug (I want to catch one so I can feed it a bunch of spiders in my house). Please identify this bug.
Signature: Stugy

Large Milkweed Bug

Large Milkweed Bug

Dear Stugy,
The Large Milkweed Bug,
Oncopeltus fasciatus, is generally found in association with Milkweed, a plant that supports a diverse insect ecosystem.  Large Milkweed Bugs have been reported to our site in association with Oleander, a common landscape and freeway plant with toxic tendencies.  See BugGuide for species verification.

Subject: Insect on Butterweed Flower
Location: SW Ohio
May 24, 2016 2:44 pm
I took this picture yesterday May 23, 2016. The insect was on a butterweed flower. I am located in S.W. Ohio between Cincinnati & Dayton. I’ve checked a lot of insect pictures but could not find this one. The closest thing that I could find was a red bug. I am an Ohio Certified Volunteer Naturalist.
Signature: Wade Hall

Whitecrossed Seed Bug

Whitecrossed Seed Bug

Dear Wade,
This is a Whitecrossed Seed Bug,
Neacoryphus bicrucis, and though it is a relatively wide ranging species, we have very few submissions until recently.  We don’t know why, but for some reason sightings of Whitecrossed Seed Bugs to our site have increased significantly recently.

Thanks for your quick reply.  I didn’t think I’d ever hear back from anybody.
Wade Hall – OCVN

Subject: Of the Strangest Appearance
Location: Gold Coast, QLD, Australia
May 24, 2016 5:27 am
Dear Bugman,
I was meditating on the porch today when I noticed a small orange object. It turned out to be the (exoskeleton?) of a strange little creature. I had simply never seen anything that alien looking in the insect kingdom so I thought it definitely necessary to send in a photo.
I’m on the Gold Coast, QLD Australia and it’s Autumn here at the moment.
Thank you very much, appreciate the site immensely.
Signature: Christopher Royce

Remains of a Cotton Harlequin Bug

Remains of a Cotton Harlequin Bug

Dear Christoper,
We can’t tell by the remains what killed this Hibiscus Harlequin Bug or Cotton Harlequin Bug,
Tectocoris diophthalmus, but we believe it was eaten by something.  The Cotton Harlequin Bug is a highly variable species, and your remains, like this individual on Flicker, are mostly orange while other individuals have a preponderance of metallic blue-green markings.  According to the Museum of Tropical Queensland:  “The Hibiscus Harlequin Bug sucks sap from hibiscus plants, bottle trees and related species. Its main foodplant is the native Beach Hibiscus (Hibiscus tiliaceus). It is also a minor pest of cultivated cotton, a member of the hibiscus family Malvaceae, leading to its other common name, the Cotton Harlequin Bug.”

Thanks so much for getting back to me, you guys run an awesome service!

Subject: I cant find it anywhere
Location: Clayton NC
May 23, 2016 8:39 am
Please identify this bug I can’t find it anywhere on the internet
Signature: I found it

Florida Predatory Stink Bug Nymphs

Florida Predatory Stink Bug Nymphs

Your beneficial Florida Predatory Stink Bug nymphs have a range well beyond Florida, and North Carolina is within their recognized range on BugGuide.

Subject: Box Elder Bug Love
Location: Monmouth County, NJ
May 22, 2016 8:46 pm
At first I thought these were beetles, but after a bit of google research I have come to think they are Box Elder Bugs. I found them like this on my window screen (mating?) where they stayed for 2-3 days with little movement.
I was unable to get a photo of the top side (or even see it), but I spotted another one about a week later and after viewing its top side it appeared to be a box elder bug.
Location: Monmouth County, NJ
Time: Around the last week of April
Signature: Anonymous

Mating Boxelder Bugs

Mating Boxelder Bugs

Dear Anonymous,
A ventral view is not ideal for an exact identification, but the red eyes that are clearly visible on the pair in your image and in this BugGuide image are a very strong indication that they are mating Boxelder Bugs.