Currently viewing the category: "True Bugs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  WTB IS IT???!!!
Geographic location of the bug:  Pearsall, Texas
Date: 05/29/2019
Time: 07:53 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Greetings Bugman,
WTB IS THAT ??!!!
Was my similar response by 1 letter.
A friend of mine from where I now reside in California is now in Texas.
He took this photo 5/24/2019 in Pearsall, Texas.
I grew up in Texas and in true tomboy form was an avid “bug collector”.
Many years and in all seasons were spent combing through the grass, foilage, and dirt.
Untold hours were spent in trees, creekside, streamside, in barns, sheds, fields, etc..etc…
I also bug watched in New Mexico, Louisiana, Tennesee, Florida, and finally the California deserts.
I have gotten up close and personal with huge grasshoppers, gargantuan centipedes, massive black scorpions, and black widow spiders, tarantulas (and had a pet one later), made buddies with a wolf spider have been buds with several manti, a walking stick, a few crickets too and even a very special sun spider that bypassed my rare fear of an insect.
I like insects as I do animals, birds, reptiles.
I have never seen a bug like this one in Texas or anywhere else.
Can you educate me in this one?
He is a handsome fellow (or felicia) in warrior’s armor to boot even if pre steel.
I applaud your stand on extermination.
I often say; “even cockroaches are simply trying to clean up OUR mess so who is actually disgusting?
Many thanks to you.
How you want your letter signed:  Amie Friederich

Immature Big Legged Bug

Dear Amie,
Thank you for your highly entertaining submission.  This is an immature Big Legged Bug in the genus
Acanthocephala, and you can compare your image to this BugGuide image.  Adult Big Legged Bugs grow quite large.  This genus is not reported from California.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What insect is this?
Geographic location of the bug:  South Africa, Freestate, Bloemfontein
Date: 05/25/2019
Time: 12:54 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Was asked to find out what kind of bug this is and I cannot find any sources to identify it.
How you want your letter signed:  Elden

Spiny Bug

Dear Elden,
We spent a good amount of time attempting to identify your fascinating looking insect, and we finally decided to post it as Unidentified, a tag with far too many postings than we would like.  We feel very confident this is a True Bug in the suborder Heteroptera and we do not think it is a Lace Bug, but our searching produced nothing.  We even tried calling it “puzzle-shaped” to no avail.  We know we have a very similar looking True Bug in our archives, and we hope to have you a more definite identification soon.  Perhaps one of our readers will recognize this interesting insect.

Update:  Spiny True Bug
Thanks to a comment from Karl who assisted us in the past, we were able to locate the previous submission in our archives, the uncharacteristic looking Coreid Bug, possibly Pephricus livingstonei, commonly called a Spiny Bug.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Assasin or Leaf-Footed?
Geographic location of the bug:  Cape Coral, FL
Date: 05/03/2019
Time: 07:32 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I’m trying to decipher if these are assassins or Leaf-Footed, I read that assassins can be carriers of Chagas Disease.  If we have assassins in our garden I want to know about it.
Thank you for your time and sharing your knowledge.
How you want your letter signed:  Please identify this bug.

Leaf Footed Bug Nymphs

These are Leaf Footed Bug nymphs, probably in the genus Leptoglossus, and though they are harmless to you, they will feed on the tomatoes .  Additionally, not all Assassin Bugs are a concern, though many will bite if carelessly handled.  Only the Blood Sucking Conenose Bugs run the risk of carrying the pathogen that causes Chagas Disease, a condition that is relatively rare in North America.  Chagas Disease is more of a concern in the tropics.

Leaf Footed Bug Nymphs

Thank you for your time.  As I tried looking at various picture on the internet, I couldn’t identify these bugs because of the large dots on the back abdomen.
Sharon

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Unidentified bugs
Geographic location of the bug:  Pinellas Park, Florida
Date: 05/12/2019
Time: 09:04 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found these on one plant in my garden, congregating as you see them in the photos. We had a torrential rainstorm, and they were still there the next day. I’m curious as to what they are.
How you want your letter signed:  Susan Heidicker Brown

Immature Leaf Footed Bugs: Spartocera fusca

Dear Susan,
These are immature Leaf Footed Bugs with no specific common name.  They are known only by the scientific name
Spartocera fusca.  We have but a single other posting of this species on our site, and that one was submitted 13 years ago.  Your submission is a catalyst for us to update that posting as it appears that the site where we originally identified it, BugGuide, no longer recognizes the name we researched in 2006, Corecoris fuscus, however, the comments dating back to 2005 use that original name.  Furthermore, our identification in 2006 was speculative as there were only images of adults pictured on BugGuide at that time, and our previous posting, like your submission, is of immature insects.  Your images are especially valuable to us as they depict several different instars representing the growth and changes the nymphs undergo as they approach maturity.  According to BugGuide:  “Breeds on Solanum americanum and other plants. Early instar nymphs are gregarious.

Immature Leaf Footed Bugs: Spartocera fusca

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is this?
Geographic location of the bug:  Virginia
Date: 05/01/2019
Time: 07:09 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello. I was wondering what kind of bug this is. I found it in my garden of pansies and daisies. I have never seen one before. I’m not sure if it flies or not, it was just crawling around on the wood that borders my garden.
How you want your letter signed:  Brieanna

Lablab Bug

Dear Virginia,
This is a Lablab Bug,
Megacopta cribraria, an invasive species accidentally introduced from China.  According to BugGuide:  “earliest record in our area: GA 2009 may invade homes in large numbers and become a household pest.”  Additionally, according to BugGuide, it is a significant agricultural pest because:  “hosts: in the US, reported to develop only on soybean and kudzu – Univ. FL, 2012.  Primary hosts are Fabaceae. It has also been reported on plants from other families, such as sweet potatoes, potatoes, corn and cotton.”  The advantage it provided by feeding on invasive kudzu weed is far outweighed by its negative attributes.  Since its introduction a scant ten years ago, BugGuide now reports it from Maryland to Florida and west to Arkansas. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is it?
Geographic location of the bug:  Bridgewater, NJ
Date: 05/11/2019
Time: 06:51 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi Bugman,
This one landed on the hood of the car as I was parking. I have never seen one of these around here. Do you know what it is? I looked around the site but didn’t find a match.
How you want your letter signed:  Thank you, Brian

Big Legged Bug

Dear Brian,
This is a Big Legged Bug in the genus
Acanthocephala.  Considering your location, it must be Acanthocephala terminalis, which ranges from Canada to Florida according to BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination