Currently viewing the category: "True Bugs"

Subject: Red bug on concrete
Location: Southern California
July 10, 2013 1:11 pm
What insect is this? I live in Southern Ca and its on my concrete.
Signature: Lisa

Red Bug

Red Bug

Hi Lisa,
This really is a Red Bug,
Scantius aegyptius, a nonnative species originally reported in California in 2009.  They seem to be spreading in the state.

Subject: Bee mimic?
Location: Powell County, KY
July 9, 2013 7:06 pm
I took this photo today while creek walking on our property in Powell County KY. I thought it was really strange a bumble bee would be attacking another bug! Then I just thought it was the strangest bumble bee ever. Once I cropped the photos and brightened the fill light to allow more detail to be seen, I don’t think this is a bumble bee! It is one mean looking dude, I’m glad these don’t come in football size!
I appreciate your help in identifying this bug!
Signature: Sandra

Bee-Like Robber Fly eats Leaf Footed Bug

Bee-Like Robber Fly eats Big Legged Plant Bug

Dear Sandra,
The predator in your photos is a Bee Like Robber Fly in the genus
Laphria, possibly Laphria grossa.  See BugGuide for more information.  The prey is a Big Legged Plant Bug in the genus Acanthocephala, and again, more information is available on BugGuide.

Bee-Like Robber Fly eats Big Legged Bug

Bee-Like Robber Fly eats Big Legged Plant Bug

Subject: Orange Morph Bug
Location: Lebanon, PA
July 10, 2013 4:33 am
I may have been mistaken, but this bug started out way smaller, black legs. Reminded me of a spider with bent up legs. I don’t know a lot about bugs, and I run from them screaming. I live in a house in Lebanon, PA. The area is woods, and the Tulip Popler is the most common tree around here.
Thank you, screaming-like-a-little-girl
Signature: Chris

Assassin Bug Metamorphosis

Assassin Bug Metamorphosis

Hi Chris,
Your photograph has captured an Assassin Bug in the process of metamorphosis.  We believe it is a Wheel Bug.  Many insects change color and darken after metamorphosis.  This Wheel Bug numph should turn dark gray.

That makes absolute sense. The Wheel-bug is common, here, in its horrifying beauty, with the cog-wheel. Since I have been running away from its adult form, I was unfamiliar with its pre-morph stage(s).
I saw the bug the evening before, and it hadn’t moved until morning hours. Then I saw something orange popping out of his back which reminded me of wings (an indicator of having my eye-sight checked) and then what looked like an orange spider on the back of the bug. For a suburban guy who moved into the wilderness, I have been introduced to the most intriguing insect-life. This includes red wasps, blue-iridescent-winged and black neon-yellow-striped thorax wasps (of which I will most certainly NOT have pictures), Luna-moth and other.
Again, thank you very much for your very fast response.
Truly
Chris

Dear Chris,
Thank you for supplying our readers with a colorful description of the metamorphosis of a Wheel Bug.

Subject: Did he eat his sibling?
Location: Andover, NJ – backyard
July 9, 2013 2:28 pm
I found an assassin bug nymph in my garden today and happily set about photographing it when I noticed what I first thought was a second nymph. But, as I watched, the white ”nymph” wasn’t moving and on closer look appeared to be just an empty shell/skin. So, did the orange nymph shed its skin or did it possibly kill a sibling?
Signature: Deborah Bifulco

Sycamore Assassin Bug Molts

Sycamore Assassin Bug Molts

Dear Deborah,
This is not sibling cannibalism.  Rather is is the metamorphosis of a Sycamore Assassin Bug from one instar to a later instar.  The shed skin is known as the exuvia.

Sycamore Assassin Bug Exuvia

Sycamore Assassin Bug Exuvia

Subject: Beetle hatchlings
Location: Vancouver WA
July 5, 2013 5:09 pm
I found these guys recently hatched on one of my flower pots. I can’t for the life of figure out what they are. Closest I came was finding a post on Flickr from a few years ago in Blue Springs Missouri wondering about the same type of bug. I’m in the Pacific Northwest.
Can you tell me what they are?
Signature: Kristie

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug Hatchlings

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug Hatchlings

Dear Kristie,
These are not beetles.  They are newly hatched Brown Marmorated Stink Bugs and this invasive, exotic species is spreading across North America.  Normally, we do not endorse extermination, but this policy does not extend to invasive, exotic species.  Squash them before they spread.

Subject: what is this?
Location: marietta, ohio
July 3, 2013 3:38 am
what kind of bug is this and is it harmful?
Signature: doesnt matter

Toe-Biter

Toe-Biter

This is a Toe-Biter or Giant Water Bug.  It is a beneficial predator, however, it has been known to bite swimmers or waders who accidentally contact it or folks foolish enough to try to pick one up carelessly.  They are not considered to be harmful, though the bite is reported to be quite painful.