Currently viewing the category: "True Bugs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: A True Bug I’ve Never Seen Before
Location: Portland, Oregon
September 20, 2016 6:18 pm
It’s been too many years since I took my college entomology class; are you able to identify unusual-looking bug? It was at rest on a hibiscus shrub and fairly relaxed about having its photo taken. The temperature was 64° and the skies partly cloudy. The location was the outskirts of Portland, Oregon.
Thanks!
Signature: David Hopkins

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug Nymph

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug Nymph

Dear David,
This is a Brown Marmorated Stink Bug Nymph,
Halyomorpha halys, a non-native species that was reported in North America “First collected in 1998 in Allentown, PA, but probably arrived several years earlier” according to BugGuide.  In less than 20 years, it has spread across North America and BugGuide reports:  “Native to E. Asia, adventive elsewhere” and “Highly polyphagous, reported on ~300 plant spp. in its native range; feeds mostly on fruit, but also on leaves, stems, petioles, flowers, and seeds. Damage typically confined to fruiting structures.”  According to the Minnesota Department of Agriculture:  “Across North America, brown marmorated stink bug has been found in 42 states and two Canadian provinces (Ontario and Quebec). It is causing severe agriculture problems in nine states and nuisance problems in 16 others.”  One of the reasons the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug is considered a nuisance is that they frequently enter homes to hibernate when the weather begins to cool.  Needless to say, we have no problem tagging the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug as an Invasive Exotic species.  You can compare your individual to this BugGuide image.

Thanks for your very prompt identification! I was familiar with the adult form, but this was the first time I saw the nymph form. You probably get questions about this all the time. In just the last few years it’s become so ubiquitous, that I see it more than any other hemipteran. Last winter, many tens of them congregated at the bathroom skylight for several weeks and removing them with the vacuum cleaner resulted in a vile stench — they lived up to their name!
Thanks again, Daniel.
David

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Is this a water scorpion?
Location: St Clair, N.S.W 2759
September 19, 2016 10:28 pm
Hi, my son and I are very big on insect spotting, this one popped up on our back porch and we have never seen anything like it. I have been researching for days to try figure out what he is and water scorpion is the closest I have come but we live out in the suburbs with no lakes,rivers or ponds anywhere.
Signature: Mummy and Noah

Water Scorpion

Water Scorpion

Dear Mummy and Noah,
This is indeed a Water Scorpion, and they are able to fly great distances in search of water.  According to Sportsman Creek Conservation Area:  “They can ambush fast swimming prey such as small fish catching them between their front legs and stabbing them with their pointed probiscus.  Known as Toe-biters able to inflict a nasty nip although this specimen played dead when disturbed. Water Scorpions are also capable fliers and inhabit waterholes over much of Australia.”  According to the Queensland Museum, Australian Water Scorpions are in the genus
Laccotrephes.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug costa rica
Location: Guanacaste, Costa Rica
September 20, 2016 12:46 am
A friend of mine found a bug outside her house in Costa Rica (Santa Rosa, Guanacaste) on Sept 18 and was wondering whether it is dangerous. I did a google search with the picture she sent me and found other pictures of the same bug none of which however indicated the name and whether it could be dangerous.
Thank you for your help!
Signature: J.

Unknown True Bug

Bark Bug

Dear J,
At this time, we are unable to provide you with an identification beyond a very general suborder Heteroptera, the True Bugs.  We did find a matching image on Insectopedia, but it is only identified as:  “Strange weirdly shaped bug.”

Dear Daniel,
Thank you so much for your quick reply – I really appreciate it!
And thank you even more for the hint. It helped me to identify the bug. It’s called “Dysodius lunatus“.
Have a wonderful day,
Julia

Hi Again Julia,
According to Alamy, it is called a Bark Bug in the family Aradidae.  FlickR has a nice image.  This represents a new family for our site.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s that bug?
Location: San Diego
September 18, 2016 5:49 pm
We found this insect in our house on the coast in San Diego California during the month of September. Based on the pictures on your site, it looks like the red shouldered pine borer or a blister beetle? We cannot tell. Please help!
Thanks!
Signature: sandy vissman

Red Shouldered Bug

Red Shouldered Bug

Hi Sandy,
This is a Red Shouldered Bug,
Jadera haematoloma, a species that frequently forms large aggregations around homes and gardens.  Though it can be a nuisance when it appears in large numbers, it is considered a benign species.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Re: Leaf Footed Bug / Unknown??
Location: South East of England, Harwich, Essex
September 15, 2016 4:09 pm
Dear Daniel (The Bugman),
Please would you kindly consider helping me identify the bug in the photos? We have come across 4 of these bugs in less than 72 hours. The first one found on my wardrobe door – the next appeared on the bathroom net curtain. Just tonight, we found another walking across a bed and to our horror another in that same bed less than 20 minutes later. As you can imagine it’s proven to be quite alarmingly as we have never seen one or these before in our life – let alone four of these in quick succession. It’s a worry in case they are dangerous insect. I don’t know if it’s a coincidence or not, but a person in my household got bitten twice on the arm in the night a week ago and whatever it were pierced the skin to draw blood. She often gets beaten by gnats due to having a rare blood group though it never pierces the skin like it did on this occasion. I could be over-worrying here for nothing although the insect had similar resemblances to “Leaf Footed Bug” except I don’t think we get those in the UK. We also found a Black Widow Spider in our shed in recent weeks meaning anything is surely possible given this heatwave and hotter weather.
I would appreciate your assistance if your team has time. 🙂
Thank you so much,
Signature: Chris

Hi Daniel,
Here is an update. We just found another one since my email.
This is a crystal clear photo
Any ideas please? :/
Cheers,
Chris

Western Conifer Seed Bug

Western Conifer Seed Bug

Dear Chris,
Thanks for sending a sharper image.  This is indeed a Leaf Footed Bug, more specifically a Western Conifer Seed Bug,
Leptoglossus occidentalis, a species native to the Pacific Northwest.  Its range began expanding in the in the mid 20th Century, and now it is found across North America as evidenced by this BugGuide map.  We suspect the range expansion is related to human travel and to the fact that this species often enters homes to hibernate as the weather begins to cool.  Early in the 21st Century, Western Conifer Seed Bugs were reported in Europe and now sightings in the UK and other parts of Europe are relatively frequent.  According to BugGuide:  “recently introduced to Europe (first record: Italy 1999) and now widespread there.”  According to British Bugs:  “A very large and spectacular squashbug which has characteristic expansions on the hind tibiae and a white zigzag mark across the centre of the forewings.   Native to the USA and introduced into Europe in 1999, it has since spread rapidly and during 2008-2011 influxes of immigrants were reported from the coast of southern England, with a wide scatter of records inland.  The bug feeds on pines and is probably well-established here; nymphs have been found at several locations. It is attracted to light and may enter buildings in search of hibernation sites in the autumn.”

Hi Daniel,
Thank you so much for the quick response! 🙂
I must apologise for my delayed response thought had already replied.
Your response was very reassuring and a huge relieve!
Keep up the great work! 🙂
Cheers,
Chris

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s this bug
Location: Black Hills National Forest SD
September 15, 2016 6:30 pm
Hello, these bugs were swarming around our house, falling on the roof like rain drops from the sky. We live in the Black Hills in South Dakota. Lots of ponderosa pine trees and some spruce. We saw them in September.
Signature: Dan

Backswimmer

Backswimmer

Dear Dan,
This is a Backswimmer, an aquatic True Bug that is also capable of flying.  Are you currently experiencing a dry spell?  It is possible that a nearby pond is drying out and these Backswimmers are seeking a new aquatic environment.  You can compare your image to this BugGuide image of
Notonecta undulata.  Of the family, BugGuide notes:  “Aquatic bugs that often swim upside-down. When resting at the surface, body is typically tilted with the head downward.”  BugGuide also notes that they are also commonly called “Water Bees, Water Wasps” because they occasionally bite swimmers.

Thanks so much. That’s exactly what it is. Not knowing was driving us crazy.  Dan

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination