Currently viewing the category: "Mirid Plant Bugs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Singapore insect
Location: Singapore
June 4, 2014 9:24 am
Hi Daniel
Was wondering if your expertise could point me in the right direction to ID this guy. I wasn’t sure what to put in the subject. I found it on the bark of a tree in rainforest habitat. It’s quite small about 15mm in length.
Thanks,
Signature: David

What's That Bug???

What’s That Bug???  A Jumping Tree Bug

Dear David,
This really is a disorienting image.  We are nearly certain this is a True Bug in the suborder Heteroptera, but it has some very distinctive features, including huge eyes that are almost fly-like and antennae that almost seem to come from the bottom of the head.  We are going to need some assistance with this identification.  It seems to resemble a Backswimmer like this image on BugGuide, but it does not look aquatic.

Daniel:
Wow!  Definitely a plant bug in the family Miridae.  There are some really strange ones.  The family is so large and diverse that I cannot begin to even assign a subfamily to this one.
Eric

It is almost like it can turn its head 180º.

Update:  Jumping Tree Bug
Based on comments received yesterday, the consensus is that this is a Jumping Tree Bug in the Plant Bug subfamily Isometopinae, and this image from BugGuide supports that consensus.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: green and brown, active bug
Location: Sierra Foothils 2000′ elevation, Weimar, CA
May 25, 2014 4:45 pm
This was flitting about my garden, and landed on me. Could it be a type of assassin bug? Or is it a leaf eater? The first picture shows it may have a long green head part in front like as assassin bug. Its body is about 3/8 inch long.
Signature: Carolyn

Strawberry Bug

Strawberry Bug

Hi Carolyn,
We believe this is a Plant Bug in the family Miridae, and we also believe we have correctly identified it on BugGuide as
Closterotomus norvegicus, commonly called a Potato Bug (already an overused common name thanks to the iconic Potato Bug or Jerusalem Cricket) or Strawberry Bug.  According to BugGuide, the food plants include:  “alfalfa, white clover, and lotus seed crops in New Zealand; a key pest of pistachios in CA; also reported on nettle, poppy, thistle and other Asteraceae.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Stink Bug Nymph … or something else?
Location: Paige, TX
April 21, 2014 1:31 pm
It’s spring in Texas, and that means two things are around the corner: blast furnace temperatures and stink bugs. I noticed some some small black and orange bugs on my onion plants about a week ago. They’re oval, and about 1/8″ wide by about 1/4″ long. They appear to be stink bugs nymphs. However, unlike those I’ve seen before, these are capable of flight. Can anyone help me to identify these critters?
Signature: Pyrrhyuloxia

Plant Bug, we believe

Plant Bug, we believe

Dear Pyrrhyuloxia,
This is not a Stink Bug, but we believe it is a member of the same suborder, Heteroptera, the True Bugs.  We believe this is a Plant Bug in the family Miridae, and a strong contender for the proper identification is
Metriorrhynchomiris dislocatus, though your images are soft and lacking in critical detail, so exact identification might not be possible.  According to BugGuide, this species of Plant Bug:  “has at least 15 color varieties. (Eric Eaton).”

I think you nailed it. Thanks!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Four Lined Plant Beetles, yellow & green
Location: Naperville, IL
July 1, 2013 6:21 pm
Hi Daniel~
Happy July! It’s been a long time (I think) since you’ve had one of these four-lined plant beetles (Poecilocapus lineatus) depicted, and I’ve never seen them around my neck of the woods until this year. They’re munching on some hydrangea leaves, and I found this yellow one and this green one on the same leaf. They’re very pretty little pests. All the best to you!
Signature: Dori Eldridge

Four Lined Plant Bug

Four Lined Plant Bug

Hi Dori,
Thanks for the new submission, however we have a correction to make to your text.  You have the scientific name correct, but your common name is not.  This is a True Bug, not a Beetle.  True Bugs have piercing/sucking mouthparts and they do not chew.  The brown spotting on the leaves might be due to the feeding which involves sucking nutritious fluids from the plants.  According to BugGuide:  “nymphs and adults feed preferentially on members of the mint family (wild mint, catnip, peppermint, spearmint, hyssop, oregano) but will attack a variety of wild plants (thistle, dandelion, burdock, tansy, loosestrife, sumac) as well as cultivated flowers (carnation, geranium, chrysanthemum, snapdragon, phlox) and crops (alfalfa, ginger, currant, raspberry, cucumber, lettuce, pea, potato, radish, squash).”  Hydrangeas are not mentioned as a food plant, but lists of food plants can often be incomplete.  Thanks again for supplying us with excellent new images of some Four Lined Plant Bugs,
Poecilocapsus lineatus.

Four Lined Plant Bug

Four Lined Plant Bug

Hi again~
It occurred to me after I sent these photos that these are not beetles at all, but rather, four-lined plant bugs, as in true bugs and hemipterans, not coleopterans. Sorry for the confusion; earlier today, I was watching a ladybird beetle larva molt into an adult, so I had beetles on the mind.
All the best,
Dori

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Singapore Green slow moving insect
Location: Singapore
December 17, 2012 5:46 am
Hi. Haven’t been able to identify this little fella. He was moving very gingerly from one leaf to another. Also can you tell me what is that vertical appendage on its back? I have seen something similar on a Helopeltis Theivora (Plant Bug). Maybe they’re related.
Signature: David

Probably Tea Bug Nymph

Dear David,
This is an immature True Bug or Hemipteran.  We could not recall
Helopeltis theivora, so we researched it.  We found a nice image on FlickR that shows the unusual appendage on the insect’s back.  That feature as well as the very long antennae are strong evidence that this is an immature Helopeltis theivora.  Additional research led us to Discover Life that provides the taxonomy that the species is a Plant Bug in the family Miridae.  Interestingly, we do have some images in our archive, also from Singapore, of Helopeltis theivora, though we didn’t remember that posting from just over a year ago.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Red and black bug
Location: Coote Island, Georgian Bay, Ontario, Canada
October 4, 2012 10:15 pm
Hello!
Thanks for running this great website – I use it a lot to help identify bugs I’ve found!
I’ve attached pictures of one that currently has me stumped. I found it in July on an island in Georgian Bay (near Parry Sound, Ontario, Canada). It’s colours were very striking red and black. I can’t find it in my Kaufman field guide or online so far. If you could help, that would be great!
Thanks
Signature: Kristin

Plant Bug

Hi Kristin,
We believe we have identified this striking insect as a Plant Bug in the family Miridae and the tribe Resthenini based on this photo on BugGuide.  Alas, we are not able to provide a species identification but it does appear to us to be a predatory species.

Plant Bug

Wow! Thank you for your quick response! The pictures match up very well. Thanks again!
Kristin

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination