Currently viewing the category: "Mirid Plant Bugs"
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Subject: Red bugs!
Location: Michigan
June 6, 2016 5:51 pm
Hi Bugman. Found these in my garden. June 6.. They are devouring my butterfly bush and asters. What are they?
Signature: MiGardener

Four Lined Plant Bugs

Four Lined Plant Bugs

Dear MiGardener,
You have both winged adults, and flightless, red nymphs of the Four Lined Plant Bug,
Poecilocapsus lineatus.  According to BugGuide:  “nymphs and adults feed preferentially on members of the mint family (wild mint, catnip, peppermint, spearmint, hyssop, oregano) but will attack a variety of wild plants (thistle, dandelion, burdock, tansy, loosestrife, sumac) as well as cultivated flowers (carnation, geranium, chrysanthemum, snapdragon, phlox) and crops (alfalfa, ginger, currant, raspberry, cucumber, lettuce, pea, potato, radish, squash).” 

Four Lined Plant Bugs

Four Lined Plant Bugs

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Subject: Insect
Location: San Diego, CA
May 29, 2016 10:10 am
I found this insect a few weeks ago and I can’t figure out what it is!
Signature: Elijah

Plant Bug:  Closterocoris amoenus

Plant Bug: Closterocoris amoenus

Dear Elijah,
Thanks to the Arthropods of Orange County site, we were able to identify your Plant Bug in the family Miridae as
Closterocoris amoenus.  According to BugGuide, the species name means “pretty.”

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Subject: brown/tan bug in northwest NJ
Location: Sparta, NJ 07871
June 3, 2015 4:12 pm
Hi, we have a lot of these outside around our yard this year. Do you know what they are? Body is about 5mm long, not including the antenna. They can fly but mostly I see them crawling on the deck and on plants out there or find them on me when doing yard work . Often when coming in from outside, there are one or two on us and I’m especially concerned about them becoming a problem in the house. I have been searching online and figured I’d try here too. Thank you.
Signature: kstef

Possibly Mirid Plant Bug

Possibly Mirid Plant Bug

Dear kstef,
We believe this might be a Mirid Plant Bug in the family Miridae, but we could not find a match on BugGuide in our initial attempt.  Perhaps one of our readers will have better luck providing an identification.

Wow, just researched that and it does look a lot like a “clouded plant bug”. Thank you!
-Kara

Hi Kara,
We just looked at images on BugGuide, and though it is similar, we do not believe you submitted a Clouded Plant Bug.  The antennae are very different if you compare, especially to this BugGuide image.
  We will see if Eric Eaton can provide any information.

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Subject: not sure of this bug
Location: Missouri, US
May 14, 2015 12:27 am
while pulling weeds I found this little fella
I honestly don’t even know where to begin with an identification
I cropped the first pic and the second I left the same for size comparison
Signature: Stolz

Four Lined Plant Bug

Four Lined Plant Bug

Dear Stolz,
This is a Four Lined Plant Bug,
Poecilocapsus lineatus, and according to BugGuide:  “nymphs and adults feed preferentially on members of the mint family (wild mint, catnip, peppermint, spearmint, hyssop, oregano) but will attack a variety of wild plants (thistle, dandelion, burdock, tansy, loosestrife, sumac) as well as cultivated flowers (carnation, geranium, chrysanthemum, snapdragon, phlox) and crops (alfalfa, ginger, currant, raspberry, cucumber, lettuce, pea, potato, radish, squash).”

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Subject: A visitor on my leg.
Location: Tucson, AZ
April 26, 2015 1:15 pm
Hello, bugman. I was sitting at a bus bench, waiting for my bus, when I noticed the insect on my jeans. It was pretty slow, and didn’t seem dangerous, so I took a few photos before shaking it off my pants. Do you have any idea what kind of bug it is?
Signature: Jeremiah

Possibly Minute Pirate Bug

Mirid Plant Bug

Dear Jeremiah,
It is a True Bug, it looks predatory and it is small, so our first thought was that this looked like a Minute Pirate Bug in the family Anthocoridae, but alas, we were unable to find any matching family members on BugGuide.  There is a similar looking insect indentified only as Tiny Green Bug from Tucson Arizona on Colin L. Miller’s Wildlife blog on the True Bugs 3 page.
  We will consult with Eric Eaton who may be able to provide an identification.

Eric Eaton Provides a Correction
Hi, Daniel:
This is a mirid plant bug (family Miridae).  Not sure of genus, and it is missing both hind legs.  Reminds me most of a freshly-molted Neurocolpus, due to the swollen first antennal segment.
Eric
author, Kaufman Field Guide to Insects of North America
http://bugeric.blogspot.com/

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Subject: Singapore insect
Location: Singapore
June 4, 2014 9:24 am
Hi Daniel
Was wondering if your expertise could point me in the right direction to ID this guy. I wasn’t sure what to put in the subject. I found it on the bark of a tree in rainforest habitat. It’s quite small about 15mm in length.
Thanks,
Signature: David

What's That Bug???

What’s That Bug???  A Jumping Tree Bug

Dear David,
This really is a disorienting image.  We are nearly certain this is a True Bug in the suborder Heteroptera, but it has some very distinctive features, including huge eyes that are almost fly-like and antennae that almost seem to come from the bottom of the head.  We are going to need some assistance with this identification.  It seems to resemble a Backswimmer like this image on BugGuide, but it does not look aquatic.

Daniel:
Wow!  Definitely a plant bug in the family Miridae.  There are some really strange ones.  The family is so large and diverse that I cannot begin to even assign a subfamily to this one.
Eric

It is almost like it can turn its head 180º.

Update:  Jumping Tree Bug
Based on comments received yesterday, the consensus is that this is a Jumping Tree Bug in the Plant Bug subfamily Isometopinae, and this image from BugGuide supports that consensus.

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