Currently viewing the category: "Minute Pirate Bugs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Wasp?
Location: Southwestern Ontario, Canada
June 24, 2017 9:46 am
I’ve photographed a few of these small (1 cm) wasps(?) with a blue patch between the eyes. I’m uploading a shot of one eating an Orius insidiosus (I think).
Signature: Jim Elve

Robber Fly eats Insidious Flower Bug

Dear Jim,
Your image is gorgeous and quite detailed.  This is not a Wasp.  It is a Robber Fly (see BugGuide) in the family Asilidae, and we generally only attempt to identify large Robber Flies to the species level as so many smaller species look quite similar.  We agree that the prey is an Insidious Flower Bug based on BugGuide where it states:  “important predator of phytophagous mites and mite eggs, insect eggs, soft-bodied insects”.

Thank you, Daniel. Your prompt reply is very much appreciated.
FYI, I have quite a few more bug photos on my website if you’re interested. Www.jimelve.ca I have probably misidentified many. I’ll be correcting a couple of shots of the robber fly. Thanks, again!
Best regards,
Jim Elve
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Pirate Bug?
Location: Picton NSW Australia
January 4, 2014 6:41 am
Hi friends
We have an immense amount of these bugs recently inhabit our farm. I can’t pinpoint them down to any host (though they do seem attracted to light). They are everywhere (seemingly doing no harm), although I recently discovered that they also suck the blood of humans (photo 2). I have been researching and the closest photographic identifications I can find is resemble the minute pirate bug or the big eyed bug.
We have a infestation of the Cabbage Whitefly (Aleyrodes proletella), so perhaps they could be a predator of these…..?
Thanks for your help.
Scott Bazely
Peppercorn Creek Organic Farm
Picton NSW
Australia
Signature: Scott Bazely

Probably Minute Pirate Bug

Probably Minute Pirate Bug

Dear Scott,
We believe you have correctly identified these True Bugs as being Minute Pirate Bugs in the family Anthocoridae, but we will try to get a second opinion.  According to BugGuide, they eat “small arthropods” and “Some species are used as biocontrol agents. Some may be a nuisance: they are known for their irritating bites, mostly after landing on one’s naked arm or neck.”  That is very consistent with what you have experienced.  Since they are not concentrated on a single plant, we would eliminate the possibility that they are a phytophagous or plant eating pest.

Minute Pirate Bug bites human

Minute Pirate Bug bites human

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination