Currently viewing the category: "Leaf Footed Bugs"
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Subject:  2 bugs I can’t find
Geographic location of the bug:  Blacksburg, Virginia
Date: 09/05/2017
Time: 08:56 AM EDT
I have 2 bugs I’ve had trouble finding out what they are. I’ve started recording bugs for my YouTube channel and I need to know what they are before I can upload the content. Thanks for your help!
How you want your letter signed:  Violent Beautiful Nature

Leaf-Footed Bug Nymph

Dear Violent Beautiful Nature,
One of your images is of a Leaf Footed Bug nymph, and we believe that based on this BugGuide image, it is in the genus
Piezogaster.  Your other insect is a Stink Bug Nymph.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  small spikey bug mid ohio
Geographic location of the bug:  north central ohio 21AUG17
Date: 09/01/2017
Time: 09:46 PM EDT
Found this very weird spiked bug while shooting eclipse pictures on 21AUG17. The critter is perhaps 1/4″-3/8″ long. Found in field in north central Ohio (Richland County). Ive tried searching many different sources and have come up empty, maybe a juvenile version of something more familiar ?
How you want your letter signed:  small spikey bug mid ohio

Immature Helmeted Squash Bug

This is definitely an immature True Bug in the suborder Heteroptera, and we believe we have identified it as a Helmeted Squash Bug, Euthochtha galeator, thanks to this BugGuide image.  According to BugGuide:  “Feeds on a variety of wild and cultivated plants (Mead 2003).”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Pomegranate bug
Location: North Phoenix Arizona
August 19, 2017 3:31 pm
Hi! I was taking pictures of my dad’s overgrown pomegranate tree yesterday and looked at the pictures more closely today to find a bug that I can’t identify with my google searches. Had I noticed it when I was taking he pictures I would have tried to get a better picture! I’ve nicknamed him Mickey.
Signature: Kt

Leaf Footed Bug

Dear Kt,
This is a Leaf Footed Bug in the genus
Leptoglossus from the family Coreidae, and all members of the family feed on plants, including many garden crops.  Leaf Footed Bugs use their proboscis to pierce the wall of a plant, on stems, leaves, flowers and/or fruits, and they feed by sucking nutrients.  This has a detrimental effect on young growth which might become stunted.  When they feed on fruits, they inject an enzyme that renders the vicinity around the bite rather discolored and unpalatable to humans.  According to BugGuide:  “Two yellowish spots on the forward part of the pronotum are distinctive” of Leptoglossus zonatus.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: bug on tomato
Location: Sacramento, California
August 14, 2017 12:39 pm
Suddenly quite a few of these. On tomatoes only. Sacramento, California.
Signature: BugTomatoes

Mating Western Leaf Footed Bugs

Dear BugTomatoes,
These are mating Western Leaf Footed Bugs, and you do not want them proliferating on your tomatoes.  They have piercing mouthparts that suck fluids from plants, including ripe tomatoes.  They inject an enzyme that makes the fruit unpalatable to humans.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bugs
Location: Crystal River Fl Central Florida E coast
August 12, 2017 2:18 pm
Hello Sir,
If you could let me know exactly what this bug is called it would be great. Thanks so much
Signature: Michelle Smith

Immature Leaf Footed Bugs

Dear Michelle,
These are immature Leaf Footed Bugs in the genus
Leptoglossus, and we found a nice page on them on the Citrus Pests site where it states:  “The genus Leptoglossus is polyphagous and attacks many weeds as well as economically-important crops.”  Bugs in this genus will feed on a wide variety of plants, many found in the vegetable garden or flower garden, and since they use their specially evolved mouthparts to pierce and suck fluids, they can severely damage tender plant shoots.  Based on the BugGuide information that “Two yellowish spots on the forward part of the pronotum are distinctive”, we are confident your individuals are Leptoglossus zonatus., a species that “may damage a wide variety of crops but is considered rare and of little economic importance.”  Here is a BugGuide image.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug found on my tomato plants
Location: Fayetteville, Texas
August 5, 2017 11:26 am
I have had them a few times this summer. Are they harmful,or are they beneficial?
Thanks for any help…
Signature: sneezles

Immature Leaf Footed Bugs

Dear sneezles,
These immature Leaf Footed Bugs in the genus
Leptoglossus feed by using their piercing mouthparts to suck fluids from plants, so they are not beneficial to your tomato productions.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination