Currently viewing the category: "Leaf Footed Bugs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination
Subject:  What are these Assassin Bug nymphs doing?
Geographic location of the bug:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
Date: 04/20/2018
Time: 04:20 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  That’s definitive, but what are they doing rolling around those sacks, and some of the sacks have been hung up?
Thanks for identifying.
How do you want your letter signed:  Mel Frank

Immature Leaf Footed Bugs with “Pod”

Ed. Note:  We met recently with noted author Mel Frank (see Amazon) and we correctly identified what he thought were Assassin Bug nymphs found on Cannabis as Leaf Footed Bug nymphs, probably in the genus Leptoglossus, based on BugGuide images as well as images from our own archives, and he wrote back wondering about this unusual activity.

“Pods” hung by immature Leaf Footed Bugs

Hi again Mel,
As we stated earlier, these Leaf Footed Bug nymphs are phytophagous, meaning they feed on plants.  Like other members of the True Bug suborder Heteroptera, they have mouths designed to pierce and suck fluids, and members of this genus are frequently found on plants like tomatoes, pomegranate and citrus, and they damage fruit.  BugGuide notes:  “some are extremely polyphagous” indicating that they will feed from many types of plants.  Some typically plant feeding True Bugs are known to feed on dead and dying insects, including members of their own species, but that is opportunistic behavior and not true predatory behavior.  What you witnessed and observed over time, the nymphs “rolling around those sacks” and then hanging them up, sounds like the behavior of a predator storing food the way spiders wrap up prey with silk.  We wonder, perhaps, if while feeding by sucking the fluids from your
Cannabis, these Leaf Footed Bugs ingested cannabinoids resulting in altered “mindbending” behavior similar to experiments on a Spider’s ability to spin a web after exposure to drugs (see Priceonomics).  We have not clue at this time exactly what is in that sack these nymphs were rolling around, or why they were rolling them around and hanging them up.  It is a mystery.  We will contact Eric Eaton to see if he knows anything about this type of behavior in Leaf Footed Bugs from the family Coreidae.  We can’t help but be reminded of “Invasion of the Body Snatchers” and the aliens using pods to generate simulacra of humans. 

Update April 25, 2018:  Eric Eaton provides information.
Daniel:
So the plant they are on is marijuana?  In any event, yes, these are Leptoglossus nymphs, which typically feed on seeds or seed pods, and that is what the “sacs” are.  I’m a bit perplexed by the “webbing” around them.  The nymphs may be maneuvering the seeds to find a good place to pierce them so they can suck out the juicy contents.
Eric
author, Kaufman Field Guide to Insects of North America
http://bugeric.blogspot.com/

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  African Warrior Mask Bug?
Geographic location of the bug:  Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico
Date: 02/23/2018
Time: 02:56 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello Bugman, this is my 3rd bug I’ve submitted!
This one is from a friend that lives in Guadalajara.
She sent it to me to get more info.
Have at it!
Thanx!
How you want your letter signed:  Mike Coniglio

Giant Mesquite Bug Nymph

Dear Mike,
This is the nymph of a Giant Mesquite Bug in the genus
Thasus.  Based on iNaturalist, we believe your individual is Thasus gigas, and iNaturalist indicates the Spanish name is Chinche gigante xamuis.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Strange bug in cabin
Geographic location of the bug:  Vermont
Date: 02/13/2018
Time: 04:20 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Can you ID THE BUG IN THE PHOTO?
How you want your letter signed:  Ken Petretti

Western Conifer Seed Bug

Dear Ken,
The Western Conifer Seed Bug is an insect with well documented behavior of entering homes when the weather cools so it can hibernate.  Native to the Pacific Northwest, the Western Conifer Seed Bug has greatly expanded its range in the last 50 year.

Dear Daniel,
Thank you very much. We were/are concerned as our grand children visit our cabin often.
I looked at your link which provided additional information.
What would you suggest the best way to contain and eliminate these bugs?
Thank you,
Ken
They are not dangerous.  We do not provide extermination advice.
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  please identify
Geographic location of the bug:  ny
Date: 02/14/2018
Time: 08:09 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  hello sir, I found this in my attic…I dont ln
kn ow what it is..
How you want your letter signed:  thank you?

Possibly Immature Western Conifer Seed Bug

This is an immature True Bug in the family Coreidae, the Leaf Footed Bugs, and we believe it is the nymph of a Western Conifer Seed Bug (see BugGuide) a species that enters homes as the weather cools so it can hibernate over the winter.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Found in kitchen
Geographic location of the bug:  Sullivan county NY
Date: 01/26/2018
Time: 08:00 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I don’t know what this bug is.
How you want your letter signed:  Nancy Heller

Western Conifer Seed Bug

Dear Nancy,
Western Conifer Seed Bugs like the one you submitted often enter homes when the weather cools so that they can hibernate.  Western Conifer Seed Bugs, though a nuisance, do not pose any threat to your home or furnishings, and they will not harm you or your pets.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Juvenile assassin bug?
Geographic location of the bug:  Canberra, ACT
Date: 01/24/2018
Time: 04:24 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi, does this look like an assassin bug instar to you? I can’t find anything  in picture files with the two spots…
How you want your letter signed:  Edwin

Hi, actually don’t bother! I think now it’s a eucalyptus tip bug instar. Thanks for your great work anyway!
Edwin

Immature Crusader Bug

Dear Edwin,
We got your subsequent communication indicating that your believe this is a “eucalyptus tip bug instar” instead of an Assassin Bug nymph, but we disagree.  Five different species of Eucalyptus Tip Wilter Bugs from the tribe Amorbini are pictured on the Brisbane Insect site, and none resemble your nymph.  We did find an image on Alamy identified as Australian Crusader bug nymphs that is a better match, and that identification is supported by images of
Mictis profana on the Brisbane Insect site.  Congratulations on identifying the correct family.  The identification of immature insects is often a challenge.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination