Currently viewing the category: "Lace Bugs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  New bug outside
Geographic location of the bug:  Northeast Pennsylvania
Date: 07/31/2018
Time: 03:22 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello,
We found this bug recently after getting wood from our wood pile, now we are finding them all over our yard and pool deck. They appear flat, can be squished, move easily over skin, seem to like wood, are very small, brown and seem to almost be one piece as opposed to having legs.
How you want your letter signed:  Tom

Lace Bug

Dear Tom,
This is a Lace Bug in the family Tingidae, and though your image is lacking in clarity, it appears it might be an Elm Lace Bug which is pictured on BugGuide, or a Cherry Lace Bug which is also pictured on BugGuide.  Of the genus that contains both,
Corythucha, BugGuide notes:  “Leaf feeders, most species have restricted food preferences” and “Some are considered pests.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: WAFFLE BUG
Location: Courtice, Ontario Canada
September 9, 2016 5:40 pm
I found this unusual bug on a leaf near the golden rod plants.
Really different than anything I’ve seen before. It was eating the leaf. there were light tan colored ones and all white ones. they look like waffles. Hope you have an idea what they are.
Signature: Terri Martin

Chrysanthemum Lace Bug

Chrysanthemum Lace Bug

Dear Terri,
Thanks to providing us with the host plant Goldenrod, we feel quite confident your Lace Bug is a Chrysanthemum Lace Bug,
Corythucha marmorata, because according to BugGuide:  “hosts: several species of Asteraceae; reported from Solidago, Aster, Ambrosia, Helianthus, Rudbeckia, Echinops.”  Solidago is the genus for Goldenrod.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s That Bug?
Location: Ridgecrest, California 93555
May 30, 2016 7:50 am
Hi Bugman,
The wife of a friend of mine (Ron) has been suffering a reaction to something for the better part of two years now. Today she came to him and said “I’ve caught one” and gave him a jar. He had purchased an electron microscope for just such a reason, so you will see the bug in the first photo.
The second photo gives you an idea about the size of the bug. See the black dot inside the bowl? That’s the size of the bug.
I’m guessing you’ll know right away what the bug is.
Signature: Very Respectfully, Donald Boessow

Lace Bug

Lace Bug

Dear Donald,
This is a Lace Bug in the family Tingidae, and according to BugGuide:  “Feed mainly on leaves of trees and shrubs, causing yellow spotting and sometimes browning and death of the leaves.”
  Like other True Bugs, Lace Bugs have mouths designed to pierce so that they might suck fluids from the plants upon which they are feeding.  You did not provide details regarding the reaction experienced by your friend’s wife, but we do not believe it is related to this Lace Bug.  We will be postdating your submission to go live to our site in June while we are away from the office.

Hi Daniel,
Thank you for the quick response! Here is what Ron’s wife, Suzy, had to say about her allergic reaction (including a response to your email) as well as other info about the Lace Bug:
“My reaction has been severe allergies they infested our clothing our furniture basically the whole house ! And my poor dogs are being eaten alive by the “black tiny shears” they leave behind which looks exactly like the underside of this thing ! They buzz you outside early sunset sometimes darker! All very very tiny! They look like lint when u kill em! My nose turns on like a faucet and I know they are coming lol ! And they make me itch almost as much as my poor pups lol! My Bella [her dog] sneezes almost as bad as me lol! I pull them off my dogs just always dead and can’t tell what it is (squished) but there ya have it ! This is def what I’ve had reactions to and they are VERY invasive I don’t care what they say their behavior is supposed to be like lol they are a nightmare! ✌🏻️ ~ Suzy Que”
Again, thank you for your help. Ron and Suzy will take the information you have provided and work towards solving Suzy’s allergy (as well as the Lace Bug’s affect on her poor dogs).
Very respectfully,
Donald Boessow

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Mystery bug
Location: North Shore, Maui, Hawaii
February 20, 2016 6:54 pm
Aloha folks, You guys were so helpful the last time that I thought I’d give it another go.
I found this guy on the underside of a Cannabis sativa fan leaf (legally grown). I’m not sure if the black spots surround it are fecal matter, but some of the black spots on the bug almost looked like babies. Any help is much appreciated.
Signature: Greg Hansen

Possibly Lace Bug Nymph

Possibly Lace Bug Nymph

Dear Greg,
This is an immature True Bug, and nymphs can be very difficult to correctly identify.  Our initial guess is that this appears to be an immature Lace Bug in the family Tingidae.  According to BugGuide, they:  “Feed mainly on leaves of trees and shrubs, causing yellow spotting and sometimes browning and death of the leaves.”  Beetles in the Bush has some nice images of immature Lace Bugs.  Aloha Arborist Association has a similar looking image of the Cotton Lace Bug, with a list of plant family hosts, but Cannabaceae is not listed.  Perhaps your Lace Bug is a different species, or perhaps the information on plant host families is incomplete.

Thank you so much Daniel!  You are a saint!  I really appreciate your help and expertise.
Greg

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: unknown flying insect
Location: Greenville, NC USA
December 14, 2015 5:31 pm
I saw this near microscopic insect on my shirt and macro photographed it with Canon point and shoot. I am amazed at the detail on such a small thing. Could you help me identify this one? Thanks.
Mike Shugart
picture taken more than one year ago.
Signature: Mike Shugart

Lace Bug

Lace Bug

Dear Mike,
This is a Lace Bug in the family Tingidae and we believe that based on images posted to BugGuide, that it is a Walnut Lace Bug,
Corythucha juglandisBugGuide states “hosts: almost exclusively, black walnut” and “Both adults and nymphs are found together on the lower surfaces of walnut leaflets where they suck the sap from the leaves. More than 100 nymphs and adults may be present at one time on one leaflet. Areas where they have fed are easily recognized because of cast skins, excrement, and dark, discolored patches of leaf. The upper leaf surface is stippled with tiny white spots that give the upper leaf surface a whitish appearance. Leaves of heavily infested trees may turn brown and fall off.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Help tree is covered
Location: Woodlawn TN
August 29, 2015 10:44 am
We have a tree covered with white flying bugs! I went to cut limbs today and it was like snow coming down! Hundreds of it these flying about! If you didn’t know my truck was white you would like it was with these bugs! Thanks for you time!
Signature: Woodymac

Lace Bugs

Lace Bugs

Dear Woodymac,
You have Lace Bugs in the family Tingidae, and according to BugGuide, they:  “Feed mainly on leaves of trees and shrubs, causing yellow spotting and sometimes browning and death of the leaves.”

Lace Bugs

Lace Bugs

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination