Currently viewing the category: "Toe Biters and other Aquatic True Bugs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Interesting bug
Geographic location of the bug:  New Windsor, New York
Date: 11/03/2017
Time: 02:46 PM EDT
I was standing outside of my car this after noon, Nov 3, 2017, and this odd looking insect landed on the roof of my car.  It looked like a class of beetle, but other than that I’m not sure.  It looked like it could use it’s rear legs to sense the environment around it as it had very fine hairs, almost painbrush like in appearence as it waved them around.  I manged to get some pictures of it, and I hope they help to identify this unique insect.  I have never seen anything like it and I would love to know more.
How you want your letter signed:  Respectfully, Jesse Trusceo

Backswimmer

Dear Jesse,
This is a Backswimmer, an aquatic predator that is also capable of flight.  According to BugGuide:  “hind legs modified for swimming, with long hairs.”  Though they are somewhat clumsy on land, they are adroit swimmers.

Backswimmer

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  This was found at the pool, straightened up into a twig when removed.
Geographic location of the bug:  Chiangmai, Thailand
Date: 11/03/2017
Time: 11:25 PM EDT
Can you tell me what this guy is?
How you want your letter signed:  Richard

Water Scorpion

Dear Richard,
This is an aquatic, predatory True Bug commonly called a Water Scorpion.  They are reported to have a painful bite.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Large Insect – Central Oregon
Geographic location of the bug:  Central Oregon
Date: 10/28/2017
Time: 10:21 PM EDT
This big ol’ bug was found outside on the ground.
How you want your letter signed:  NA

Toe-Biter

Giant Water Bugs in the family Belostomatidae are frequently called Toe-Biters.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What type of insect is this?
Geographic location of the bug:  Puerto Rico
Date: 10/24/2017
Time: 10:15 AM EDT
Hi, we have just experienced a large hurricane in Puerto Rico and all sorts of bugs I’ve never seen before are coming out, but this one is really interesting it was aprox 2 inches long. Can you help identify it.
Thanks
How you want your letter signed:  Mike

Toe-Biter

Dear Mike,
We on the mainland are well aware that Hurricane Maria devastated Puerto Rico, and we also understand that aid is progressing at a glacial pace.  Hurricanes frequently blow insects, as well as birds and other even larger creatures, to remote locations, so we researched if there are any local Giant Water Bugs or Toe-Biters native to Puerto Rico.  On page 35 of Insectos de Puerto Rico, we found an image of
Lethocerus annulipes, so unless the creature in your image is a different species that looks very similar, you encountered a local species.  Toe-Biters are aquatic, but they can also fly if their ponds dry out.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  UFI – Unidentified Flying Insect
Geographic location of the bug:  Park County, Colorado 9300 feet
Date: 10/09/2017
Time: 05:40 PM EDT
I was draining our water feature yesterday and noticed this bug swimming underwater.  Its hind legs were really long, making it a good swimmer.  I fished it out of the pond and it flew away pretty quickly.  Bright green between the eyes.
Can you ID it?  None of the sources I’ve looked at seem to have it.  Thank you!
How you want your letter signed:  Brad Klafehn

Backswimmer

Dear Brad,
As its name implies, this Backswimmer in the family Notonectidae swims on its back, with its ventral surface up.  Your individual looks like the one in this BugGuide posting from a high elevation in California that is identified as
Notonecta kirbyi.  It is also reported from Colorado according to BugGuide’s data.  As you observed, Backswimmers can also fly quite proficiently, which serves them well should the pond they are hunting in dry out.  Backswimmers are also called Water Bees or Water Wasps, according to BugGuide, because of their painful bite, a fact many swimmers and waders can confirm.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is it?
Geographic location of the bug:  Central California
Date: 10/05/2017
Time: 11:18 PM EDT
We found this in the yard…never seen it before
How you want your letter signed:  Casey

Toe-Biter

Dear Casey,
This is an aquatic predator known as a Giant Water Bug or Toe-Biter, and as its name implies, the painful bite inflicted on countless waders and swimmers through the years has resulted in its very descriptive common name.  Though aquatic, they are also capable of flying from pond to pond, and they are attracted to lights, leading to yet another common name, Electric Light Bug.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination