Currently viewing the category: "Ebony Bugs"
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Subject: Tree bug
Location: Austin
March 29, 2017 7:51 pm
Found these today in austin, tx. It is spring time.
Signature: Alytown

Ebony Bugs

Dear Alytown,
We believe these are black, adult Ebony Bugs from the family Thyreocoridae as well as immature, wingless, red nymphs.  See BugGuide for additional information, where it states:  “Shiny black, broad oval, convex shape. Tibiae have no spines or slender ones. Large scutellum covers most of abdomen and wings. Look like beetles but have 5-segmented antennae and 4-segmented beak” and “feed on flowers and developing seeds.”

Ebony Bugs

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Different species of bugs aggregated?
Location: Rome, Italy
October 23, 2015 11:56 am
Hello,
my dad found this aggregation of bugs in Rome and took a picture. He then sent it to me since I am studying zoology and I started doing some researches about it. By reading your website, I found out that the situation we are looking at is immature bugs, forming aggregation. However that post was about Harlequine bugs, individually coloured of both colours black and red. While in my picture some bugs are red with black stains, while other, in the same aggregation, are entirely black.
Therefore I was wondering, are they different species? Or maybe black ones are younger and still did not develop the red colouration?
Hope you can give me some answer 🙂
Thank you very much!
Signature: Costanza

Ebony Bug Aggregation

Ebony Bug Aggregation

Dear Costanza,
We believe this is an aggregation of Ebony Bugs in the family Thyreocoridae, and that the red individuals are the immature ones.  British Bugs has images of one species.  Also pictured on British Bugs is the Burrowing Bug,
Canthophorus impressus, in the family Cydnidae.  Alas, there is not enough detail in your image to be certain.

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Beetles
Location: Levant, Maine
February 11, 2012 6:48 pm
I have asked all around and no one seems to know. When I blew on them the scattered really fast.
Signature: Tammy Costain

Ebony Bugs

Dear Tammy,
You have an aggregation of Ebony Bugs in the family Thyreocoridae.  This grouping contains both red and black, wingless nymphs and black, winged adults.  We learned on BugGuide that the common family name has been changed from the politically incorrect Negro Bugs to Ebony Bugs, and that Eric Eaton and Kenn Kaufman in the Kaufman Field Guide to Insects of North America were among the first authors who noted the change.

Close Up of Ebony Bugs

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination