Currently viewing the category: "Assassin Bugs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Found on Asters and it appears to prey on bees
Geographic location of the bug:  Bloomington, Indiana
Date: 10/16/2017
Time: 09:31 PM EDT
I’ve seen a couple of these bugs. They are pretty small, only looking like a tiny piece of bark that fell onto the flower. They seem to park themselves on the aster and aren’t afraid of being photographed. Today, I got a shot of one sucking on the abdomen of a small bee. It looked like the bee wad dead.
How you want your letter signed:  Teddy Alfrey

Ambush Bug eats Flower Fly

Dear Teddy,
Your images are exquisite.  The predator in your images is an Ambush Bug, and though it resembles a bee, the prey is actually a Flower Fly or Hover Fly in the family SyrphidaeAmbush Bugs are frequently found on blossoms where they ambush insects, many of which are pollinators.

Ambush Bug

Daniel,
Thanks for the “exquisite” comment, and the quick reply!!
My thought was that the prey was something like a Mason Bee, but of course, you’re right about the Flower Fly.
I have quite a few insect photos on my Flickr page:  https://www.flickr.com/photos/teddyalfrey/albums
And on Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/teddy.alfrey
Other than bees, my favorite insects to photograph are spiders, but I don’t get much love for my spider photos!
Thanks again!!!
Teddy.

We have published your links so maybe you will get some additional traffic.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Insect Identification
Geographic location of the bug:  Zarcero, Costa Rica
Date: 10/14/2017
Time: 04:28 PM EDT
I haven’t found this guy in books or websites yet. Is it possible you know what it is?
How you want your letter signed:  Charlie Doggett

Cog-Wheel Bug

Dear Charlie,
Your insect bears such a strong resemblance to the North American Wheel Bug that we are quite certain it is in the same genus.  Many years ago we posted an image of a mating pair of similar looking members of the genus that we tentatively identified as
Arilus carinatus, but we do not know how many members of the genus are found in Central America.  Right now we cannot access BugGuide to verify how many members of the genus are known.  Flicker has an image of Arilus carinatus that looks very similar to your image, and we strongly suspect that identification is correct.  A google book entitled Latin American Insects and Entomology by the amazing Charles Leonard Hogue has a drawing on page 223 of the Cog-Wheel Bug, Arilus carinatus.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Unusual creature in pennsylvania
Geographic location of the bug:  Berks county, pa
Date: 10/09/2017
Time: 05:10 PM EDT
I am curious add to what this odd bug is. Is it invasive?
How you want your letter signed:  DW

Wheel Bug

Dear DW,
This is a native predatory Wheel Bug.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is this
Geographic location of the bug:  Tucson, AZ, midtown backyard
Date: 10/08/2017
Time: 12:38 PM EDT
Found this sitting on a sweet potato vine on my patio. It’s tiny, less than 1/4 inch long. Moves slowly. Was spotted at 9:20 am.
How you want your letter signed:  Carla

Sycamore Assassin Bug Nymph

Dear Carla,
This looks to us like an immature Sycamore Assassin Bug, a predatory species that will help keep your sweet potato vine free of insect pests.

Thank you so much for taking the time to identify my bug… And so quickly! Glad to know he’s a beneficial! Love the site, keep up the good work! Thank you again!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this guy?
Location: northern California
September 10, 2017 10:25 am
I would very much like this little guy identified! I found him caught in some old spider web and rescued him. He seems quite thankful 🙂 I initially thought he was a stick or stilt bug, but I’m not positive.
Signature: (is this for my name?) Rayne

Assassin Bug Nymph

Dear Rayne,
This is an Assassin Bug and we believe it is in the genus
Zelus, a group of insects that is often a subject of an inquiry to our site when a person has received a painful bite through careless handling or an accidental encounter.  Though not considered dangerous, the bite is reported to be quite painful.  You are lucky your kind deed did not result in a bite, but at any rate, we are tagging your submission with the Bug Humanitarian Award.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  New Bug to Me
Geographic location of the bug:  Powhatan, VA 23139
Date: 09/04/2017
Time: 05:39 PM EDT
Can you tell me what kind of bug this odd?
How you want your letter signed:  Terry Kefalas

Wheel Bug

Dear Terry,
This is one of the best images we have received of a Wheel Bug in a long time.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination