Currently viewing the category: "Assassin Bugs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Milkweed bug?
Location: Roma, Queensland
February 7, 2017 6:45 am
Hi, im working in australia at the moment and this guy got into my boilersuit and bit my leg! The closest thing i could find on google was a large milkweed bug but it doesnt look exactly like the pictures, and google says they dont bite? Unfortunately my colleague stepped on him before i could take a picture of him and take him outside. I also seen a spider that one of the locals told me is a red back spider, but again it doesnt look like the pictures on google. Just curious as we dont have any of these guys back home and wouldnt want to tell people its the wrong bug!
Signature: Jon

Assassin Bug

Dear Jon,
We feel confident that this is a male Ground Assassin Bug in the genus
Ectomocoris, but the Brisbane Insect site only has images of wingless females and we only have images of wingless females in our archive.  We located a thumbnail of a male Ground Assassin Bug on the Atlas of Living Australia, but we cannot find the page with the full sized image.  We also located these images of mounted specimens on the Swedish Museum of Natural History.  The Spider is NOT a Redback

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Two insects and Cordyceps
Location: Ecuador, Yasuni adjacent to Napo River
February 4, 2017 8:34 am
During January 2017 I was in the Yasuni area, adjacent to the Napo River of Ecuador. During the hours of darkness I was photographing the very small insect on the top of the plant that had been infected by the cordyceps fungus. When along flew the green insect and settled beside the dead one. Body size of the insect is about 2cm or 3/4 of an inch. Is the green insect an assassin bug and what type? Do you think both insects are the same? There had been a lot of rain at the time I was there. It was very hot and humid and low altitude.
Signature: Moira

Assassin Bug Nymph and Adult Assassin with Fungus Infection

Dear Moira,
Both insects in your stunning image are Assassin Bugs.  The one with the Fungus Infection is a winged adult and the other an immature, wingless nymph, but we cannot state for certain that they are the same species, but we believe that is a good possibility.  You indicated that the living one “flew” and we suspect you stated that incorrectly as it has no wings.  Again, you image is positively stunning.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Please help
Location: Carrollton, TX 75010
January 27, 2017 9:06 am
I managed to take a picture of this bug that scared the living hell out of me a few years ago and I’ve been wanting to ID it ever since.
Signature: Joseph

Wheel Bug

Dear Joseph,
Predatory Wheel Bugs are not aggressive towards humans, but we would not want to eliminate the possibility that a bite might occur if a Wheel Bug is carelessly handled.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: F^©%ed up bug
Location: Brisbane
January 10, 2017 8:42 pm
Its got 6 legs, the bottom half is yellow with orange stripes on the side the top half is black, the legs are orange and black, the entanas are orange, looks like a stinger at the front, moves slow asf,
Signature: By tellin me what the fck this

Common Assassin Bug

We would urge you to handle this Common Assassin Bug, Pristhesancus plagipennis, which we identified on the Brisbane Insect site, with extreme caution.  Though it is not a dangerous species, it can deliver a painful bite.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: millipede assassin bug
Location: Dordrecht, Eastern Cape, South Africa
January 7, 2017 11:16 pm
Bugman
Here are my images, but I am unable to load three at a time so I am going to try and send them one by one.
Enjoy!
Signature: Lollie Venter

Millipede Assassin Bugs prey on Millipede

Dear Lollie,
When you submitted a comment to a posting in our archives of Millipede Assassin Bugs preying on a Millipede, we did not imagine that your images were going to be as spectacular as they turned out to be.  They are an excellent addition to our archives.  According to Beetles in the Bush, the Millipede Assassin Bugs
:  “Ectrichodia crux belongs to the subfamily Ectrichodiinae, noted for their aposematic coloration – often red or yellow and black or metallic blue, and as specialist predators of Diplopoda (Heteropteran Systematics Lab @ UCR).  Species in this subfamily are most commonly found in leaf litter, hiding during the day under stones or amongst debris and leaving their shelters at night in search of millipedes (Scholtz and Holm 1985). They are ambush predators that slowly approach their prey before quickly grabbing the millipede and piercing the body with their proboscis, or “beak.”  Saliva containing paralytic toxins and cytolytic enzymes is injected into the body of the millipede to subdue the prey and initiate digestion of the body contents, which are then imbibed by the gregariously feeding assassin bugs.”

Millipede Assassin Bugs prey on Millipede

Dear Lollie,
Thanks for sending us additional images.  We now have six of your images posted to our site.

Daniel,
The video is still in production.  Will send it as soon as it has been done.
Regards
Lollie

Millipede Assassin Bugs prey on Millipede

Millipede Assassin Bugs with Prey

Millipede Assassin Bug with Prey

Millipede Assassin Bugs with Prey

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this?
Location: San Jose ca USA
December 17, 2016 2:04 pm
Just wondering what this is.
Signature: Thank you

Possibly Four Spurred Assassin Bug

Possibly Four Spurred Assassin Bug

This is a predatory Assassin Bug and we believe it is in the genus Zelus, possibly the Four Spurred Assassin Bug, Zelus tetracanthus, which is pictured on BugGuide.  Though not considered dangerous to humans, Assassin Bugs in the genus Zelus are known to deliver a painful bite if carelessly handled or accidentally encountered.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination