Currently viewing the category: "Assassin Bugs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Strange looking bug
Geographic location of the bug:  Holden Beach, NC
Date: 07/10/2019
Time: 10:59 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This bug appeared on our door. It’s quite different and I can’t tell if it’s in the Mantid or the Grasshopper family. Maybe neither! I’m hoping you will tell me.
How you want your letter signed:  Ronald

Wheel Bug

Dear Ronald,
This is neither a Mantid nor a Grasshopper.  It is a predatory Assassin Bug known as a Wheel Bug.  Your image beautifully illustrates the cog-like projection on the thorax that explains the common name.  Like other Assassin Bugs, Wheel Bugs might bite if carelessly handled.  They have a proboscis designed to suck fluids from their prey, and a puncture to the skin from that proboscis is likely quite painful.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  1 inch big with spots
Geographic location of the bug:  South Texas
Date: 07/01/2019
Time: 01:44 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello, what is this?
How you want your letter signed:  G

Kissing Bug

Dear G,
This is a Kissing Bug or Blood Sucking Conenose Bug in the genus
Triatoma, a group that has garnered significant publicity in recent years because it spreads Chagas Disease through biting.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Bug identify
Geographic location of the bug:  Baltimore, Maryland
Date: 06/28/2019
Time: 11:42 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This bug is rare
How you want your letter signed:  Shay

Wheel Bug Nymph

Dear Shay,
This is an immature Wheel Bug.  Wheel Bugs are not considered rare.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is it?
Geographic location of the bug:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
Date: 06/28/2019
Time: 08:09 AM PDT
Your letter to the bugman:  3legged.  Focus is a bit off. its foot closest us looks good.
How you want your letter signed:  Chris Howard

Thread-Legged Bug

Hi Chris,
This is a Thread Legged Bug, an Assassin Bug in the subfamily Emesinae, and it is a beneficial predator.  It actually does have six legs if you look closely.  Four rear legs are used for walking, and projecting out in front of the two antennae are the pair of raptorial front legs that are used to capture prey.  Here is a BugGuide image for comparison.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Mr. Belvedere
Geographic location of the bug:  Southport, North Carolina
Date: 06/26/2019
Time: 08:12 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Came to work and saw these guys hanging out on my door.  What’s that bug?!
How you want your letter signed:  However

Wheel Bug

This is a predatory Wheel Bug.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  got stung by this bug
Geographic location of the bug:  southeastern coast of NC
Date: 06/16/2019
Time: 06:34 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I believe I got stung by this insect. I had left my drink on a fence post outside when I got it back and was holding it felt a severe burn iui n sting and only got a short glimpse of the insect I saw this guy on my front porch yesterday and was sure this met the color and size(pretty big) of the culprit. My sting is still slightly swollen painful and itchy after a week.Do these guys sting?
How you want your letter signed:  Melba

Wheel Bug

Dear Melba,
Wheel Bugs do not sting, however we frequently caution our readers to handle Wheel Bugs with caution as they might bite, though unlike other Assassin Bugs, we rarely get reports of actual bites from Wheel Bugs.  Though the bite of a Wheel Bug is not considered dangerous, the local effects of a reportedly painful bite might last some time.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination